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BibleProject

English, Religion, 1 season, 408 episodes, 2 days, 46 minutes
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The creators of BibleProject have in-depth conversations about the Bible and theology. A companion podcast to BibleProject videos found at bibleproject.com
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Why Does Jesus Want Us to Love Our Enemies?

Sermon on the Mount E16 – In Matthew 5:43-48, Jesus shares his sixth and final case study based on the wisdom of the Torah, and it may be the most challenging one yet. The first three case studies focused on treating others as sacred image-bearers of God. The fourth and fifth case studies offered guidance on how to handle conflict. And in the final case study, Jesus concludes with wisdom on how to respond to people who not only dislike us but even desire our harm. In this episode, Jon and Tim discuss one of Jesus’ most famous teachings: “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.”View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: Recap of the Sermon so Far (00:00-11:16)Chapter 2: Unpacking “Love Your Neighbor and Hate Your Enemy” (11:16-20:12)Chapter 3: Who Is My Neighbor? (20:12-33:47)Chapter 4: Loving Like God and the Meaning of Teleios (33:47-51:36)Referenced ResourcesThe Gospel of Matthew (New International Commentary on the New Testament) by R. T. France Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTS“Better Days” - Evil Needle“Inner Glow” - Bao & Packed RichShow CreditsJon Collins is the creative producer for today’s show, and Tim Mackie is the lead scholar. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey, Frank Garza, and Aaron Olsen are our audio editors. Tyler Bailey is also our audio engineer, and he provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/15/202451 minutes, 36 seconds
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What Jesus Means by “Turn the Other Cheek”

Sermon on the Mount E15 – In Matthew 5:38-42, Jesus offers wisdom from the Torah about retaliation, justice, and nonviolent resistance to injustice. He references a series of laws in Exodus 21, Leviticus 24, and Deuteronomy 19, all of which contain the familiar language of “eye for eye, tooth for tooth.” Jesus reveals the surprising wisdom within these laws, using real-life scenarios that would have been familiar to oppressed Israelites living under Roman occupation: turning the other cheek, giving your cloak, and going the extra mile. In this episode, Jon, Tim, and Michelle discuss how these actions can open up our imaginations for boldly standing against injustice in creative, nonviolent ways.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: Cultural Background of “Eye for Eye” (00:00-20:45)Chapter 2: The Meaning of “Do Not Resist” (20:45-28:13)Chapter 3: Turn the Other Cheek (28:13-39:20)Chapter 4: Give Up Your Coat (39:20-45:30)Chapter 5: Go the Extra Mile (45:30-01:01:00)Referenced ResourcesThe Gospel of Matthew: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary by Craig S. KeenerThe JPS Torah Commentary: Exodus by Nahum M. SarnaRomeo and Juliet by William ShakespeareStrength to Love by Martin Luther King Jr.Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsJon Collins is the creative producer for today’s show, and Tim Mackie is the lead scholar. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey, Frank Garza, and Aaron Olsen are our audio editors. Tyler Bailey is also our audio engineer, and he provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/8/20241 hour, 1 minute
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Why Does Jesus Say Not to Swear Oaths?

Sermon on the Mount E14 – In Matthew 5:33-48, Jesus offers three case studies about how people can work together in spite of conflict. The first case study focuses on the ancient practice of oath keeping. By the time of Jesus, ancient Israelites no longer spoke the divine name of Yahweh out of respect, but they would still swear oaths by things closely related to God—like the sky, land, temple, etc. Some people used these oaths as a loophole because they felt less serious to break (“I only swore by the temple!”). In this episode, Jon and Tim discuss Jesus’ teaching on oaths, which demonstrates God’s wisdom on the integrity of our words and the danger of even small deceptions.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: The Historical Background of Oaths (00:00-13:22)Chapter 2: The Heart Beneath Oaths (13:22-30:44)Chapter 3: Oaths From the Evil One (30:44-46:15)Referenced ResourcesThe Divine Conspiracy by Dallas WillardCheck out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenAdditional music by UpsiDownBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsJon Collins is the creative producer for today’s show, and Tim Mackie is the lead scholar. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey, Frank Garza, and Aaron Olsen are our audio editors. Tyler Bailey is also our audio engineer, and he also provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/1/202446 minutes, 16 seconds
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How Jesus Responded to the Divorce Debate

Sermon on the Mount E13 – In Matthew 5:31-32, Jesus offers a quote from the Torah about when it is lawful to divorce, and then he shares his perspective. But what is the context of these words, and how would Jesus’ original audience have heard them? It’s easy for modern readers to miss, but Jesus is entering a longstanding debate concerning a passage about divorce in Deuteronomy 24—and his take is surprising. In this episode, Jon, Tim, and special guest Jeannine Brown discuss the story surrounding divorce in ancient Israel, the Bible’s ideal of covenant loyalty, and the wisdom we can find in Scripture to navigate divorce in our culture today.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: The Context of Jesus’ Words on Divorce (00:00-11:51)Chapter 2: Divorce in Ancient Jewish Culture (11:51-23:06)Chapter 3: Divorce Compared to the Genesis 1-2 Ideal (23:06-42:49)Referenced ResourcesDictionary of Jesus and the Gospels (The IVP Bible Dictionary Series) by Joel B. Green, Jeannine K. Brown, Nicholas PerrinThe Gospel of Matthew (New International Commentary on the New Testament) by R.T. FranceThe Gospel of Matthew (New International Greek Testament Commentary) by John Nolland Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie Kohen BibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsJon Collins is the Creative Producer for today’s show. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey, Frank Garza, and Aaron Olse are our audio editors. Tyler Bailey is also our audio engineer, and he provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Special thanks to Jeannine Brown. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/25/202445 minutes
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Jesus' Vision for Sex and Desire

Sermon on the Mount E11 – In Matthew 5:27-30, Jesus references the Torah’s command to not commit adultery (Exod. 20:14), going on to say that any man who lusts (or “goes on looking”) at a woman commits adultery with her in his heart. So what is his solution to avoid lust? Cut off a hand and gouge out an eye! Whoa—what is Jesus talking about? In this episode, Jon, Tim, and special guest Lucy Peppiatt discuss the meaning and impact of lust, the Bible’s original ideal for men and women, and Jesus’ countercultural vision for sex and marriage in the Kingdom of the skies.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: The Impact of Lust and a Solution to the Problem (0:00-24:40)Chapter 2: The Genesis 1 Ideal for Men and Women and How It Falls Apart (24:40-34:30)Chapter 3: The Revolutionary Christian Vision for Marriage and Sex (34:30-47:39)Referenced ResourcesCheck out Tim’s library here.If you’d like to learn more from our guest Lucy Peppiatt, you can take her 1 Corinthians Class in BibleProject Classroom.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsJon Collins is the creative producer for today’s show, and Tim Mackie is the lead scholar. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza are our audio editors, and Tyler Bailey also provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Special thanks to Lucy Peppiatt. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/18/202447 minutes, 39 seconds
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Why Do the Beatitudes Matter for the Overworked and Hopeless? – Sermon on the Mount Q+R 1

Why do we not find the Sermon on the Mount in the gospels of Mark or John? Why is “blessed” not a good translation of the word makarios? And if Jesus says that mourning, powerlessness, and poverty are the key to the good life, should we pursue those things? In this episode, Tim and Jon respond to your questions from the first seven episodes of the Sermon on the Mount series. Thank you to our audience for your incredible questions!View more resources on our website →Timestamps Why do we not find the Sermon on the Mount in the gospels of Mark or John? (1:05)Why is “blessed" not a good translation of makarios? (9:43)Why does Matthew 5:3 matter to people who feel overworked, crushed, oppressed, domesticated, complacent, powerless, and hopeless? (19:25)Should we pursue mourning, powerlessness, and poverty if that is the good life? (27:34)Is there something I should be doing to attain the blessings in the Beatitudes? (27:58)How can we “bless the Lord?” (37:27)Isn’t there more to righteousness than right relationships with others? (46:18)Is the meekness Jesus describes the same as Moses’ meekness in Numbers 12:3? (52:24)Are there techniques early Christians used that could help us today to remember and reflect on the sermon? (60:17)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsJon Collins is the creative producer for today’s show, and Tim Mackie is the lead scholar. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; and Colin Wilson, producer. Tyler Bailey is our audio engineer and editor, and he provided the sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Today’s host is Jon Collins.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/11/20241 hour, 8 minutes, 7 seconds
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How Is Anger the Same as Murder?

Sermon on the Mount E10 – In Matthew 5:21-48, Jesus reveals the divine wisdom of Israel’s Old Testament laws through six case studies. In the first case study, he expounds on one of the Ten Commandments, “Do not murder” (Exod. 20:13). After acknowledging this command, Jesus takes it further by saying that anyone who is angry with his brother or publicly shames someone is also guilty of murder. What does he mean? In this episode, Jon and Tim discuss Matthew 5:21-32, exploring key concepts—such as murder, contempt, and divine justice—and what they tell us about the value of human beings.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: What Jesus Is Doing in These Case Studies (0:00-8:45)Chapter 2: Overview of Matthew 5:21-32 (8:45-18:09)Chapter 3: Insults, Contempt, and the Value of Human Beings (18:09-26:11)Chapter 4: The Paradox of the Crime and the Punishment (26:11-32:07)Chapter 5: The Meaning of the Word Gehenna (32:07-56:15)Referenced ResourcesThe Divine Conspiracy by Dallas WillardThe Sermon on the Mount and Human Flourishing by Jonathan T. PenningtonThe Gospel of Matthew (New International Commentary on the New Testament) by R.T. FranceThe Geography of Hell in the Teaching of Jesus by Kim PapaioannouThe Fate of the Dead by Richard BauckhamCheck out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie Kohen BibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsJon Collins is the creative producer for today’s show, and Tim Mackie is the lead scholar. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey is our audio engineer and editor, and he provided the sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/4/202456 minutes, 24 seconds
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What Does Jesus Think of Old Testament Laws?

Sermon on the Mount E9 – What did Jesus mean when he said he came to fulfill the Law and the Prophets? In Jesus’ day, the laws from the Torah were over a thousand years old. And the Jewish people under Roman occupation weren’t able to follow all of the laws perfectly, leading to countless interpretations of how the people could observe the Torah. So what made this rabbi from Nazareth’s approach to the law any different? In this episode, Jon and Tim discuss Matthew 5:17-20, unpacking its historical context, most perplexing phrases, and the greater righteousness that Jesus is introducing to his listeners.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: Short Recap of the Sermon So Far (0:00-3:03)Chapter 2: Interpreting the Torah in Jesus’ Day (3:03-16:03)Chapter 3: The Sky and Land, the Least and the Greatest (16:03-28:14)Chapter 4: Jesus Differs from the Pharisees on Righteousness (28:14-34:27)Chapter 5:  Righteousness in Matthew’s Gospel Compared to Paul’s Letters (34:27-40:17)Chapter 6: Introducing Jesus’ Idea of the Greater Righteousness (40:17-47:18)Referenced ResourcesCheck out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie Kohen BibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsDan Gummel is the Creative Producer for today’s show, and Tim Mackie is the lead scholar. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey and Aaron Olsen are our audio editors. Tyler Bailey is also our audio engineer, and he provided the sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/26/202447 minutes, 18 seconds
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The Salt of the Land and the Light of the World

Sermon on the Mount E8 – Why does Jesus call his followers salt and light? In the Hebrew Bible, salt is a metaphor for God’s long-lasting covenant with Israel, connected to priestly sacrifices, ritual purity, and social bonds. And the Hebrew word for light, or, shares a wordplay with torah, meaning God’s wise instruction. God’s wisdom given in the Torah is a light for Israel that they are called to share with the nations. In this episode, Jon and Tim discuss the meanings of salt and light, showing how Jesus applies these covenant words to his new community of followers.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: The Meaning of Salt and Light in the Bible (0:00-9:29)Chapter 2: A Key Hebrew Wordplay Between “Light” and “Instruction” (9:29-11:49)Chapter 3: Light and God’s Torah in the Book of Isaiah (11:49-29:21)Chapter 4: Salt and Light as Metaphors for the Covenant (29:21-46:29)Referenced ResourcesMatthew 1-7: Volume 1 (International Critical Commentary) by W.D Davies, Dale C. Allison Jr., and Christopher M. Tuckett The Sermon on the Mount and Human Flourishing: A Theological Commentary by Jonathan T. PenningtonCheck out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsDan Gummel is the creative producer for today’s show, and Tim Mackie is the lead scholar. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey is our audio editor and engineer, and he provided the sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Special thanks to Jonathan Penngington. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/19/202446 minutes, 29 seconds
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What Does It Mean to Make Peace? (The Beatitudes Pt. 4)

Sermon on the Mount E7 – What will it cost us to live like Jesus in our world? In the third and final triad of the Beatitudes, Jesus declares that the good life belongs to the peacemakers. But making peace Jesus-style will mean conflict, pain, difficulty, and even persecution. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and others explore the cultural tensions surrounding Jesus, his audience, and the four ancient groups who tried to make peace and how Jesus’ teachings created conflict with all of these groups.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: The Meaning of Peacemaking (0:00-7:18)Chapter 2: The Four Kinds of People in Jesus’ Audience (7:18-18:14)Chapter 3: Jesus Makes Peace Differently (18:14-21:12)Chapter 4: Why Peacemaking Leads to Persecution (21:12-24:27)Chapter 5: Investing in the New Creation (24:27-37:52)Chapter 6: A Musical Summary of the Beatitudes (37:52-44:10)Referenced ResourcesCheck out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsDan Gummel is the Creative Producer for today’s show. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey is our audio editor and engineer, and he provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Special thanks to Ben Tertin and Rose Mayer. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/12/202444 minutes, 10 seconds
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The Type of People God Is Forming (The Beatitudes Pt. 3)

Sermon on the Mount E6 – What does it look like to have our desires and actions completely aligned with God’s will? In the second triad of the Beatitudes, Jesus paints a picture of the kind of people God is forming in the Kingdom of the Skies. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and guests break down the biblical words for righteousness, justice, mercy, and purity throughout the Bible, leading up to Jesus’ words in the Sermon on the Mount.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: Hungering and Thirsting for Righteousness (0:00-6:32)Chapter 2: Right Relationships, Justice, and Equity (6:32-13:18)Chapter 3: Righteousness and Trust in God (13:18-24:17)Chapter 4: What Jesus Means by Mercy (24:17-32:53)Chapter 5: The Challenge of a Pure Heart (32:53-42:18)Chapter 6: Portraying Purity of Heart in Art (42:18-46:47)Referenced ResourcesMatthew 1-7: Volume 1 (International Critical Commentary), W.D Davies, Dale C. Allison Jr., and Christopher M. TuckettInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsDan Gummel is the Creative Producer for today’s show. Tim Mackie is our Lead Scholar. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey and Yanii Evans are our audio editors. Tyler Bailey is also our audio engineer, and he provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Special thanks to Ben Tertin. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/5/202446 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Powerless, Grieving, and Unimportant (The Beatitudes Pt. 2)

Sermon the Mount E5 – What does it mean to be poor in spirit, mourning, and meek? Jesus uses these words in the opening of the Sermon on the Mount, and the guys examine them in biblical Greek and Hebrew, finding that a better translation may be “powerless,” “grieving,” and “unimportant.” These are the people that Jesus believes will have the “good life.” How can that be? In this episode, Jon, Tim, and guests explore the first triad of the Beatitudes, shedding light on how those at the bottom of society are actually better prepared to receive the kingdom of the skies.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: A Kingdom for the Powerless (01:25-13:50)Chapter 2: Comfort for the Grieving (13:50-21:07Chapter 3: Making Space for Grief (21:07-24:15)Chapter 4: An Inheritance for the Unimportant (24:15-35:19)Chapter 5: Portraying a Jesus-Style Revolution (35:19-40:40)Referenced ResourcesA Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to Saint Matthew (The International Critical Commentary, Vol. 1) by Dale C. Allison Jr., Christopher M. Tuckett, Graham I. DaviesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSOriginal Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenShow CreditsDan Gummel is the Creative Producer for today’s show. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey and Yanii Evans are our audio editors. Tyler Bailey is also our audio engineer, and he provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Special thanks to Ben Tertin, Josh Espasandin, Rose Mayer, and Nyssa Oru. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/29/202440 minutes, 40 seconds
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What Does "Blessed" Mean? (The Beatitudes Pt. 1)

Sermon on the Mount E4 – What does Jesus mean when he calls people “blessed” in the first section of the Sermon on the Mount? The Greek word translated as “blessed” is makarios, and its Hebrew equivalent is ashrey, which means “the good life.” But there’s another Hebrew word for blessing, barukh, which refers to blessings from God. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and guests unpack what it means to be blessed according to Jesus’ counterintuitive message as he ushers in the kingdom of the skies. View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: What Jesus Means by “Blessed” (00:00-13:24)Chapter 2: The Meaning of Ashrey in Other Hebrew Literature (13:24-17:55)Chapter 3: What Is the Good Life? (17:55-21:06)Chapter 4: Jesus Reframes the Good Life (21:06-33:33)Referenced ResourcesThe Wisdom of Ben-Sira (Ecclesiasticus) by Yeshua Ben SirachInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsDan Gummel is the Creative Producer for today’s show. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Tyler Bailey and Yanii Evans are our audio editors. Tyler Bailey is also our audio engineer, and he provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Special thanks to Ben Tertin, Breon Gummel, and Rick McKinley. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/22/202433 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Sermon on the Mount's Place in the Gospel of Matthew

Sermon on the Mount E3 – The Sermon on the Mount is one of five major speeches Jesus gives in the Gospel of Matthew, and there are many similarities between these speeches. What is Matthew doing in his gospel that is unique from the other gospels? And how does this shape his portrayal of Jesus? In this episode, Jon and Tim discuss how the Sermon on the Mount fits into the larger context of the Gospel of Matthew.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: Jesus’ Five Speeches in Matthew (00:00-14:55)Chapter 2: How Matthew 5-7 and 23-25 Work Together (14:55-18:09)Chapter 3: The Structure of the Sermon on the Mount and Conclusion (18:09-22:55)Chapter 4: A Reading of the Sermon on the Mount (22:55-40:33)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsDan Gummel is the Creative Producer for today’s show. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Yanii Evans and Tyler Bailey are our audio editors. Tyler Bailey is also our audio engineer, and he provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Special thanks to Jonathan Pennington. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/15/202440 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Hebrew Bible’s Connection to the Sermon on the Mount

Sermon on the Mount E2 – As a Jewish rabbi, Jesus was immersed in the Hebrew Bible, or what Christians often call the Old Testament. The Hebrew Bible tells the story of God working with ancient Israel to bring about his Kingdom. And in the New Testament, Jesus claimed that God’s Kingdom was at long last arriving in him. In this episode, Tim and Jon walk through the three parts of the Hebrew Bible, showing how they connect to what Jesus teaches in the Sermon on the Mount. Plus, Michelle, Dan, and Aaron go on a field trip to look at a Torah scroll to better understand how the Hebrew Bible is designed.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: Repentance in the Sermon on the Mount (00:00-12:35)Chapter 2: Exploring a Hebrew Bible Scroll (12:35-17:57)Chapter 3: How Jesus Interprets the Torah (17:57-25:00)Chapter 4: The Hebrew Bible’s Differing Book Order—Including the Prophets (25:00-27:38)Chapter 5: The Sermon on the Mount as the Fulfillment of Prophetic Hope (27:38-35:21)Chapter 6: The Last Book of the Hebrew Bible and the Writings (Ketuvim) (35:21-37:22)Chapter 7: The Sermon on the Mount as Wisdom Literature (37:22-40:43)Chapter 8: How the Hebrew Bible’s Structure Provides Context for the Sermon on the Mount (40:43-43:54)Referenced ResourcesSermon on the Mount: A Beginner's Guide to the Kingdom by Amy Jill LevineInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsDan Gummel is the Creative Producer for today’s show. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; Colin Wilson, producer; and Stephanie Tam, consultant and editor. Yanii Evans and Tyler Bailey are our audio editors. Tyler Bailey is also our audio engineer and provided our sound design and mix. JB Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Special thanks to Aaron Shaw. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast. 
1/8/202443 minutes, 54 seconds
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Kicking Off a Year With Sermon on the Mount – Sermon on the Mount E1

Most of us have probably heard sayings from Jesus’ famous teaching, commonly called the Sermon on the Mount. It's only 100 verses, but the sermon has created an enduring legacy that has shaped countless lives throughout history. In this first episode of a yearlong series on the Sermon on the Mount, Tim and Jon introduce some new voices and share stories of influential people who were inspired by Jesus’ words. Then the team lays out the basic facts of the Sermon on the Mount and the different ways it’s been interpreted over 2,000 years.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Chapter 1: Meet the Team and Hear Stories (00:00-18:08)Chapter 2: The Basics of the Sermon (18:08-32:22)Chapter 3: Interview with The Chosen Creator, Dallas Jenkins (32:22-44:15)Chapter 4: Domestication Strategies for the Sermon Throughout History (44:15-56:21)Referenced Resources“Letter from the Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr.The Cost of Discipleship by Dietrich BonhoefferThe Hiding Place by Corrie Ten BoomThe Sermon on the Mount, Utopia or Program for Action? by Pinchas E. LapideInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music Original Sermon on the Mount music by Richie KohenBibleProject theme song by TENTSShow CreditsStephanie Tam is the Lead Producer for today’s show. Production of today’s episode is by Lindsey Ponder, producer; Cooper Peltz, managing producer; and Colin Wilson, producer. Tyler Bailey is our audio engineer and editor, and he also provided our sound design and mix. Brad Witty does our show notes, and Hannah Woo provides the annotations for our app. Today’s hosts are Jon Collins and Michelle Jones.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/1/202456 minutes, 22 seconds
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Celebrating and Looking Forward—Happy New Year!

In our final episode of 2023, Tim, Jon, and BibleProject CEO, Steve, celebrate everything we worked on this year and the patrons who made it possible. The guys then talk about everything coming up in 2024 and beyond, including a sneak peek of a special new series coming in 2024 at the end of the show!View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part (00:00-9:28)Part two (9:28-17:09)Part three (17:09-32:39)Part four (32:39-49:10)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Grey” by J.Folk“Red M3” by Kreatev“Birds” by Afroham, PleijShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/25/202353 minutes, 23 seconds
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Can We Be Agents of Chaos With Good Intentions? – Chaos Dragon Q+R 2

Does the dragon always deceive humans into sinning? Can we become agents of chaos even when our intentions are good? What does it mean that Satan “entered into” Judas at the last supper? In this episode, Tim and Jon respond to your questions from the second half of the Chaos Dragon series. Thank you to our audience for your thoughtful questions!View more resources on our website →Timestamps Does the Dragon Always Deceive Humans Into Sin? (00:00-7:36)Are the Scales in Paul’s Eyes a Reference to the Dragon? (7:36-14:22)Are the Dragon Rahab and Rakhab in Jeremiah Connected? (14:22-21:22)Was the Chaos Dragon Created To Be Evil? (21:22-26:55)Can We Become Agents of Chaos Even With Good Intentions? (26:55-32:03)What Does It Mean That Satan “Entered” Judas? (32:03-47:45)Referenced ResourcesLiddell and Scott's Greek-English LexiconThe New Strong's Expanded Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, James StrongKilling a Messiah: A Novel, Adam WinnInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Audience questions compiled by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/18/202347 minutes, 44 seconds
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Chaos and the Cosmos: An Astronaut Interview – Chaos Dragon E19

In this series, we’ve talked a lot about chaos—chaos waters and the great chaos monsters of the deep. In this episode, Tim and Jon interview an expert with a unique vantage point on the chaos of the cosmos, NASA astronaut Tracy Caldwell-Dyson. Listen in as they discuss the fascinating intersection between ancient cosmology and modern scientific exploration of our universe.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-16:23)Part two (16:23-29:02)Part three (29:02-45:07)Part four (45:07-1:01:18)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll music breaks by Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/11/20231 hour, 1 minute, 18 seconds
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The Dragon of Revelation – Chaos Dragon E18

 The Revelation, the last scroll in the Bible, is an apocalyptic vision about the reordering of the entire cosmos. And like the conclusion of any good story, it brings together all the themes in the Bible, including the theme of the dragon. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the dragon in John’s Revelation.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-8:19)Part two (8:19-25:19)Part three (25:19-37:40)Part four (37:40-51:08)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSMusic breaks by Patrick MurphyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/4/202357 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Dragon in Paul's Letters – Chaos Dragon E17

The biblical theme of the dragon is a way to think of a personal foe, the Satan, and an impersonal force—the relentless power that exerts itself over humanity and all of creation. In this episode, Tim and Jon look at how the Apostle Paul talked about death and disorder almost as if they were dragons, starting with Paul's letters to the Romans and the Corinthians.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-10:26)Part two (10:26-26:42)Part three (26:42-44:46)Part four (44:46-55:49)Referenced ResourcesPaul at the Ball: Ecclesia Victor and The Cosmic Defeat of Personified Evil in Romans 16:20, Michael J. ThateWhat's Our Problem?: A Self-Help Book for Societies, Tim UrbanInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAdditional sound design by Tyler Bailey, Dan Gummel, and Matthew Halbert-HowenShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/27/202355 minutes, 49 seconds
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The Only Way to Slay the Dragon – Chaos Dragon E16

The theme of the chaos dragon runs all through the story of the Bible—along with the biblical authors’ expectation of a coming king who will one day slay the dragon for good. That dragon-slaying king is Jesus, but the way he defeats the dragon is not what anyone expected. In this episode, Tim and Jon explore what it means to truly gain victory over the dragon.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-8:53)Part two (8:53-22:31)Part three (22:31-36:21)Part four (36:21-44:24)Part five (44:24-51:46)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll music breaks by Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/20/202351 minutes, 46 seconds
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A Human With Power Over the Dragon – Chaos Dragon E15

As we’ve traced the theme of the chaos dragon in the Bible, we’ve come to expect what the biblical authors expect: a dragon-slaying king to come. When the gospel authors introduce us to Jesus, they’re quick to show that Jesus is human, yet he wields power beyond what other humans possess. He triumphs over snake-like adversaries in the wilderness, subdues chaos waters with a word, and even has power over spiritual beings. In fact, Jesus does all the same things God himself does. In this episode, join Jon and Tim as they explore what it means for Jesus to be God’s anointed dragon-slaying king.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-14:29)Part two (14:29-21:51)Part three (21:51-32:48)Part four (32:48-46:44)Referenced ResourcesLiddell and Scott's Greek-English Lexicon, Henry George Liddell and Robert ScottInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll music breaks by Patrick MurphyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/13/202346 minutes, 44 seconds
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Daniel and the Four Monsters – Chaos Dragon E14

Daniel 7 describes an incredible, apocalyptic dream had by the prophet Daniel where he sees four chaos monsters oppressing the people of God. Just like the other dragon stories we've encountered in the Bible, Yahweh shows up in Daniel's vision as the ultimate dragon slayer—only this time, he's not alone. There's another human-like figure who comes riding in on the clouds to fight the dragon. In this episode, Jon and Tim explore the theme of the dragon in the scroll of Daniel.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-12:24)Part two (12:24-19:21)Part three (19:21-25:57)Part four (25:57-38:29)Part five (38:29-49:05)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll music breaks from “Leche Demos” by Matthew Halbert-HowenShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.
11/6/202349 minutes, 5 seconds
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Does the Dragon Sometimes Win? – Chaos Dragon E13

In the story of the Bible, the dragon is a recurring symbol of chaos, death, and destruction. The good news is, Yahweh is the dragon slayer, and he gives humans power over the dragon too. But in the Bible—and in our own lives—we can encounter stories like Job’s. The scroll of Job explores what happens when a righteous person, someone who should be experiencing God's Eden blessing, gets their life co-opted by the dragon instead. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they explore the story of Job.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-14:13)Part two (14:13-20:05)Part three (20:05-29:56)Part four (29:56-37:55)Part five (37:55-46:28)Part six (46:28-59:31)Referenced ResourcesPiercing Leviathan: God's Defeat of Evil in the Book of Job (New Studies in Biblical Theology, Volume 56), Eric OrtlundPlaying With Dragons: Living With Suffering and God, Andrew R. AngelInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAdditional sound design by the BibleProject teamShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Transcript edited by Grace Vang. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/30/202359 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Dragon Slayer in the Psalms – Chaos Dragon E12

While the chaos dragon is not God’s rival--it’s the rival of creation--it is God’s enemy. The Psalms sometimes portray creation as the ordered result of Yahweh’s battle with the dragon, to bring order out of chaos. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss two psalms that look back to the cosmic battle at the beginning of creation and also look ahead to a day when Yahweh will give his own dragon-slaying power to a human image of God.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-8:07)Part two (8:07-23:23)Part three (23:23-36:12)Part four (36:12-48:27)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music“Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll music from Leche Demos by Matthew Halbert-HowenShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/23/202348 minutes, 27 seconds
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What Does it Mean to be Evil? – Chaos Dragon Q+R 1

Did God create disorder and chaos? What does it actually mean to be evil? And how do you tell your kids that in the Bible dragons are actually the “bad guys”? In this episode, Tim and Jon respond to your questions from the first half of the Chaos Dragon series. Thank you to our audience for your incredible questions!View more resources on our website →Timestamps Did God Create Disorder? (2:29)What is God’s Relationship to the Darkness? (15:05)What Does it Mean to be Evil? (21:41)Does God Use the Dragon for His Own Purposes? (33:49)Does the Dragon Theme Give People a Way to Justify Violence? (47:49)How Do You Tell Your Kids Dragons Are the “Bad Guys”? (52:57)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Audience questions compiled by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/16/202358 minutes, 52 seconds
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Was the World Ever Perfect? – Chaos Dragon E11

The theme of the chaos dragon raises some challenging questions. For instance, if God created a perfect world and humans messed it up, why did the dragon and the chaos waters exist at the beginning of the universe? Why would God allow the potential for chaos at all? In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss God’s goodness and the existence of evil, through the lens of the chaos dragon theme.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-13:33)Part two (13:33-30:44)Part three (30:44-47:06)Part four (47:06-1:01:03)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll music breaks by Patrick MurphyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Transcript edited by Grace Vang. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/9/20231 hour, 1 minute, 33 seconds
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Jonah and the…Chaos Dragon? – Chaos Dragon E10

The story of Jonah employs all the major motifs of the theme of the chaos dragon: chaotic waters, a servant of God who rebels against him, and a great sea monster. But the story doesn't call it a sea monster—the story calls it a great fish! Join Tim and Jon as they discuss Jonah, thrown into the deep abyss and swallowed up by death, and the reality that even the belly of the beast is no match for Yahweh.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:21)Part two (11:21-28:00)Part three (28:00-45:04)Part four (45:04-58:59)Referenced ResourcesJonah (Brazos Theological Commentary), Philip CaryBerit Olam: Twelve Prophets: Volume I: Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Marvin A. SweeneyLiddell and Scott's Greek-English Lexicon by Henry George Liddell, Robert ScottThe Iliad, HomerInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll music breaks are from “Lay Them Straight” by Everett Patterson with additional sound design by Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/2/202358 minutes, 59 seconds
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The Dragon-Like Behavior of Three Nations – Chaos Dragon E9

When Israel chooses to act like the chaos monster instead of living like the people of God, God brings judgment on them. How? He sends other bigger monsters after them, namely, Babylon and Egypt. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the scrolls of Jeremiah and Ezekiel and their focus on the dragon-like behavior of these three nations––as well as God’s promise to bring about justice for each and every dragon in the end.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-12:26)Part two (12:26-26:07)Part three (26:07-38:12)Part four (38:12-47:19)Referenced ResourcesThe Dragon, the Mountain, and the Nations: An Old Testament Myth, Its Origins, and Its Afterlives, Robert D. Miller IIInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll music breaks from Leche Demos by Matthew Halbert-HowenShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/25/202347 minutes, 19 seconds
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Isaiah and the Dragon – Chaos Dragon E8

What happens when the entire nation of Israel consistently aligns themselves with the dragon? They themselves become a chaos monster Yahweh has to deal with. In this episode, Tim and Jon explore the scroll of Isaiah and the prophet’s indictment of Israel for choices that betray the image and blessing of God they were meant to bring to the world. View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-12:52)Part two (12:52-23:50)Part three (23:50-36:22)Part four (36:22-56:54)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll music breaks by Patrick Murphy and Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/18/202356 minutes, 54 seconds
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David and Goliath the Dragon – Chaos Dragon E7

So often the symbol of the chaos monster shows up embodied by a human bent on oppressing other people. Goliath, one of the Bible’s most well-known bad guys, is depicted as having scaly armor like a snake and defying not just Israel, but Yahweh. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the theme of the dragon in the story of David and Goliath.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-18:05)Part two (18:05-32:00)Part three (32:00-42:32)Referenced ResourcesThe Serpent in Samuel: The Messianic Motif, Brian A. VerrettInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSMusic breaks by Patrick MurphyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/11/202350 minutes, 45 seconds
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Women Who Slayed Dragons – Chaos Dragon E6

In today’s episode, we once again encounter a theme that’s becoming all too familiar: humans becoming chaos monsters. Jabin, king of Canaan, and Sisera, the commander of his army, are depicted as serpents in Judges 4, and the humans who overcome these two dragons are two women, Deborah and Jael. Join Tim and Jon as they explore the theme of the dragon in the scroll of Judges.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:44)Part two (11:44-28:25)Part three (28:25-42:07)Part four (42:07-50:01)Referenced ResourcesThe Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament, Ludwig Koehler, Walter Baumgartner, and Johann Jakob StammInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll additional music breaks by Patrick MurphyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/4/202350 minutes, 1 second
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Is the Church a City? – The City Q+R 2

Was Cain’s city a good thing initially? If Israel was just as bad as Sodom and Gomorrah, why didn’t God destroy it too? And how will God redeem the city in the new creation? In this episode, Tim and Jon respond to your questions from the second half of The City series. Thank you to our audience for your insightful questions!View more resources on our website →Timestamps Was Cain’s City Originally a Good Thing? (2:28) Why Didn’t Israel Face the Same Judgment as Sodom? (13:24) Why Is Babylon Depicted So Negatively in the Bible? (23:21) How Will God Redeem the City? (31:48) Is the Church a City? (38:18) Referenced ResourcesThe Moral Vision of the New Testament: Community, Cross, New Creation, A Contemporary Introduction to New Testament Ethics, Richard B. HaysInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Audience questions compiled by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/30/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Power Over the Dragon in Exodus – Chaos Dragon E5

God created humans to bear his image, but sometimes we choose our own destruction and start to look a lot more like chaos monsters instead. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss a human who the prophets frequently called a sea dragon: the Pharaoh who ruled Egypt and enslaved Israel in the scroll of Exodus. If Pharaoh is the seed of the serpent, who is the seed of the woman in Exodus? Listen in to find out!View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-15:26)Part two (15:26-23:53)Part three (23:53-40:05)Part four (40:05-51:22)Referenced ResourcesEchoes of Exodus: Tracing Themes of Redemption Through Scripture, Alastair J. Roberts and Andrew WilsonEchoes of Exodus: Tracing a Biblical Motif, Bryan D. EstelleInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAdditional sound design by Tyler Bailey, Dan Gummel, and Matthew Halbert-HowenShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/28/202351 minutes, 22 seconds
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The Creature Crouching at the Door – Chaos Dragon E4

Genesis 3 is probably the most famous serpent-featuring story in the Bible—the moment we get to see humans and the nahash interact for the first time. Because the serpent lures the humans into choosing their own demise, it’s also the moment Yahweh announces that the seed (descendant) of the serpent will remain a rival to the seed of the woman. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss Genesis 3-4 and talk about what happens when humans themselves start to act like the chaos monster.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-8:12)Part two (8:12-17:33)Part three (17:33-31:28)Part five (31:28-47:06)Referenced ResourcesThe Dragon, the Mountain, and the Nations: An Old Testament Myth, Its Origins, and Its Afterlives, Robert D. Miller IIInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“String Trio #1,000,000” by Everett PattersonShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/21/202347 minutes, 6 seconds
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Ferocious Dragons and Rogue Stars – Chaos Dragon E3

Dragons show up on page one of the Bible, named among the beings that feature in the seven-day creation narrative in Genesis 1. God creates dragons to inhabit the chaos waters, and we meet one early on that tries (and succeeds) to get the first humans to choose their own destruction. Why would God create these creatures? What is their purpose? Join Tim and Jon as they talk about the literary function of dragons in the Bible.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-8:29)Part two (8:29-19:38)Part three (19:38-35:05)Part four (35:05-47:49)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAdditional sound design by Tyler Bailey, Dan Gummel, and Matthew Halbert-HowenShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/14/202347 minutes, 49 seconds
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The First Worldwide Meme – Chaos Dragon E2

When we read the word “myth,” often what comes to mind is a fictional story. However, a myth is a way of exploring universal concerns of human existence, using symbols for things we may or may not have words to describe. The dragon is one such myth—a symbol humans have used for millennia to talk about chaos and death. Some might say it was one of the first worldwide memes. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss ancient Near Eastern literature about dragons.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-6:21)Part two (6:21-20:43)Part three (20:43-31:49)Part four (31:49-49:18)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAdditional sound design by the BibleProject teamShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey.  Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/7/202349 minutes, 18 seconds
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Dragons in the Bible – Chaos Dragon E1

 Nahash, tanin, leviathan––the Bible is full of strange words describing a creature many modern readers can’t quite categorize. All these words are ways of referring to a monster of the deep, a dragon. In this episode, Tim and Jon kick off a brand new theme study, the chaos dragon, with a look at the language the Bible uses to describe this creature.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-4:27)Part two (4:27-20:25)Part three (20:25-31:13)Part four (31:13-46:03)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSAll other musical compositions and sound design are original works by the BibleProject team.Show produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/31/202346 minutes, 3 seconds
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How Did Abraham Know About the City of God? – The City Q+R

How could Abraham have anticipated a coming City of God, like the author of Hebrews said? What’s the connection between the shame of Adam and Eve and that of their son Cain? Was Genesis first an oral tradition, and how did it become a written account with so many literary hyperlinks? In this episode, Tim and Jon respond to your questions from the first half of The City series. Thank you to our audience for your incredible questions!View more resources on our website →Timestamps How Could Abraham Have Anticipated the City of God? (2:05)What Are the Parallels Between Adam and Eve’s Shame and Cain’s? (12:50)Was Genesis First an Oral Tradition? (23:48)Is There a Connection Between the Tower of Babel and Jacob’s Ladder? (33:52)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Audience questions compiled by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/24/202351 minutes, 18 seconds
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The Heavenly City – The City E13

In the Bible, cities have a bad reputation as centers of immorality and unrighteous living. First-century followers of Jesus continued to live in cities, but they lived by an other-worldly ethic set by Jesus. Their way of living was so different that Jesus’ followers began to talk about their citizenship being primarily in a coming heavenly city, rather than the physical city in which they lived. In this episode, join Jon and Tim as they wrap up our theme study of the city.  View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-21:17)Part two (21:17-27:20)Part three (27:20-47:11)Part four (47:11-1:05:17)Referenced ResourcesNew International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis, Willem A. VanGemerenThe Garden City, John Mark ComerInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Lost Love” by Toonorth“Acquired In Heaven” by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/17/20231 hour, 5 minutes, 17 seconds
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Jesus, the New Jerusalem – The City E12

As the story of the Bible unfolds, the expectation for a city of God—a new Jerusalem where Heaven and Earth will be fully united—continues to grow. Yet the gospel authors seem to think this new Jerusalem is most fully realized in Jesus himself. So if Jesus is the new Jerusalem, what’s his relationship with the physical city of Jerusalem? In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss how Jesus and his followers become the new Jerusalem. View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-19:01)Part two (19:01-21:23)Part three (21:23-45:24)Part four (45:24-54:56)Part five (54:56-1:03:42)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Backyard Puddles” by Sleepy Fish“According to God” by Beautiful Eulogy“Passing the Time” by Tyler Bailey & Matthew Halbert-HowenShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/10/20231 hour, 3 minutes, 42 seconds
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Whose Idea Was the “City of God”? – The City E11

Cities appear to be inherently bad in the story of the Bible. So when Jesus calls his followers a city on a hill, what does he mean? And why is the vision of the new creation a city instead of a garden? In this episode, Tim and Jon review some of the major motifs in the theme of the city so far and explore the concept of a city of God.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-22:02)Part three (22:02-33:57)Part three (33:57-44:17)Part four (44:17-54:52)Referenced ResourcesNew International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis, Willem A. VanGemerenThe Garden City, John Mark ComerInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Goofy Nights in Tokyo” by Sam Stewart“Vivid” by Chromonicci“Can I Get a Cab?” by Tyler Bailey & Matthew Halbert-HowenShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Transcript edited by Grace Vang. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/3/202354 minutes, 52 seconds
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Jesus’ Disciples Are a City – The City E10

The city of Jerusalem, established by David to be the home of God, is a glimpse of what a divine city could look like, but even Jerusalem becomes corrupt. Is there any kind of city we can actually put our hope in? Jesus seemed to think so. He said he was the place where Heaven and Earth are fully united, allowing God and humanity to dwell together. Then he took it a step further to say his followers are a city on a hill, the city of God. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the new Jerusalem.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:08)Part two (11:08-25:46)Part three (25:46-33:32)Part four (33:32-47:31)Part five (47:31-1:02:52)Referenced ResourcesThe City We Became: A Novel, N.K. JemisinInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Traveling” by Anbuu“Sailing on a Flying Boat” by Enzalla (both middle breaks)“Mt. Elsewhere” by Mama AiutoShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/26/20231 hour, 2 minutes, 52 seconds
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Jerusalem: A Tale of Two Cities – The City E9

Israel was meant to be a picture of the heavenly city of God, but over time, it began to look more like Babylon, Nineveh, and Sodom and Gomorrah. In the scroll of Isaiah, the prophet announces Yahweh’s coming judgment on Israel because of their oppression of other humans. Join Tim and Jon as they discuss the city of God in the scroll of Isaiah.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-13:05)Part two (13:05-28:38)Part three (28:38-36:29)Part four (36:29-51:00)Part five (51:00-57:33)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Thunderbird” by McKinley WilsonShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/19/202357 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Anointed Question and Response

When Jesus tells Nicodemus people must be born again of water and Spirit, is that connected to the anointing theme? Is Jesus’ anointing in the Jordan supposed to remind us of the flood story? Does an antichrist have to first be a christ (anointed one)? In this episode, Tim and Jon explore your questions about the theme of the anointed. Thanks to our audience for your incredible questions!View more resources on our website →Timestamps Is Jesus’ Teaching on Water and Spirit Part of the Anointed Theme? (01:25)Is Jesus’ Anointing in the Jordan Connected to the Flood Story? (09:10)What’s the Connection Between Oil and Blood in the Bible? (20:14)Does an Antichrist Have to First Be a Christ? (29:21)Why Was Jesus Anointed With Perfume Before His Death? (44:53)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/14/202359 minutes, 24 seconds
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City of God or City of Cain? – The City E8

When we first read about Jerusalem in the Bible, it appears to be a golden city—founded by David, a center of victory, prosperity, and unity. But it doesn’t take long for the cracks to begin to show, and Jerusalem becomes a home for idolatry and oppression. What happened to the city David founded to cause the prophet Micah to accuse it of being a city founded on human bloodshed? In this episode, Tim and Jon talk about how even the so-called city of God can resemble the city of Cain.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-9:29)Part two (9:29-21:26)Part three (21:26-40:08)Part four (40:08-53:21)Part five (53:21-1:03:12)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Ah” by a contributor“Wonderful” by Beautiful Eulogy“New Babylon” by McKinley WilsonOriginal sound design by Dan GummelShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/12/20231 hour, 3 minutes, 12 seconds
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The Bible's Most Famous City – The City E7

Jerusalem is the Bible’s image of what a city of God should be. But from the earliest moments of its founding, it's clear that even this city has problems. What will it take for a city to truly become like the garden of Eden? In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the founding of Jerusalem and what it will take for God and humans to dwell together.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-18:21)Part two (18:21-33:17)Part three (33:17-49:27)Part four (49:27-59:22)Part five (59:22-1:27:15)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Effervescent” by Toonorth“Everything is Yours” by Liz ViceOriginal sound design by Dan Gummel“Forgot It Was Monday” by Sleepy FishShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/5/20231 hour, 27 minutes, 15 seconds
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Can a City Be Good? – The City E6

At last, there’s a positive example of a city in the Bible, the capital city of Egypt under the rule of Joseph. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they explore how a city—usually a perpetrator of death and violence—can become a source of life under the leadership of a wise human image of God.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-10:55)Part two (10:55-34:49)Part three (34:49-49:38)Part four (49:38-59:35)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Onteora Lake” by McEvoy & Stan Forebee“Firefly Field” by Aso, Aviino & Middle School“Alone Time” by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/29/202359 minutes, 35 seconds
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Sodom and Gomorrah – The City E5

If Babylon is the worst city in the Bible, then Sodom and Gomorrah are a close second. The injustice and oppression in Sodom and Gomorrah are so pronounced that God sends a flood of justice to completely wipe out these two cities. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the theme of the city and the darkest parts of human nature.Content warning: Today's episode contains some mention of sexual abuse, rape, and incest.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-16:30)Part two (16:30-34:55)Part three (34:55-52:47)Part four (52:47-1:05:29)Referenced ResourcesIntroduction to Inner-Biblical Interpretation, Yair ZakovitchInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Two Thousand Miles” by Aviino“Covet” by Beautiful Eulogy“City Fades” by Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/22/20231 hour, 5 minutes, 29 seconds
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The Biggest, Baddest City in the Bible – The City E4

You may have heard that Babylon was the biggest, baddest city in the Bible, but where did that reputation come from? Who founded the city, and what made it so detestable to God? In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they explore the story of the half-human, half-god Nimrod and the city he founded.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-16:08)Part two (16:08-30:37)Part three (30:37-41:00)Part four (41:00-59:28)Referenced ResourcesThe Context of Scripture, William W. HalloInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Canary Forest” by Aso, Aviino, & Middle School“Winterrain” by tusken“Beaver Creek” by Aso, Aviino, & Middle School“Catching the Tube” by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/15/202359 minutes, 28 seconds
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A Symptom of Human Violence – The City E3

As the story of the Bible unfolds, humanity grows more and more violent. Cain is more violent than his parents, and his descendants are more violent than him. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss Lemek, Cain’s far more murderous descendant, and humanity’s escalating violence that prompts God to flood the earth.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-18:31)Part two (18:31-36:18)Part three (36:18-51:52)Part four (51:52-1:14:37)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Organized Religion” by Beautiful Eulogy“She Won’t Say” by Psalm Trees & Guillaume Muschalle“Forever Tired” by Psalm Trees & Guillaume MuschalleShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/8/20231 hour, 14 minutes, 28 seconds
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Why Cain Builds a City – The City E2

In the story of the Bible, cities are a bad thing. They’re a symptom of humanity’s violence and attempts to protect themselves instead of trusting God. In fact, in the second chapter of Genesis, God “builds” something for humanity’s protection. And it’s not a city—it’s a woman. In this episode, Tim and Jon explore the theme of the city and the first thing God builds.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-12:51)Part two (12:51-35:26)Part three (35:26-44:40)Part four (44:40-1:14:49)Referenced ResourcesTrees and Kings: A Comparative Analysis of Tree Imagery in Israel’s Prophetic Tradition and the Ancient Near East, William OsborneSymbolism of the Biblical World: Ancient Near Eastern Iconography and the Book of Psalms, Othmar KeelWordplay in Ancient Near Eastern Texts (Ancient Near East Monographs), Scott B. Noegel Interested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Portland Synth Cruise” by Sam Stewart“Hello from Portland” by Beautiful Eulogy“Start Me Up” by Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/1/20231 hour, 14 minutes, 49 seconds
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The Surprise of the City – The City E1

The theme of the city in the Bible is a surprising one. When cities are introduced in the story, they’re depicted as “bad”—a human response to increasing violence and the need for self-protection—and gardens are depicted as humanity’s ideal setting. However, in the book of Revelation, the new creation Jesus brings is a city. What’s going on here? Join Tim and Jon as they start exploring the biblical theme of the city.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-20:11)Part two (20:11-32:09)Part three (32:09-50:30)Part four (50:30-1:06:53)Referenced ResourcesNew International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis, Willem A. VanGemerenThe Garden City, John Mark ComerInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Kokon” by Plusma & Guillaume Muschalle“Long Lost Friend” by Sam Stewart“Just a Thought” by Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/24/20231 hour, 6 minutes, 53 seconds
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Jesus’ Anointing Ceremony – Anointed E6

“Jesus the anointed one” is the literal translation of the Greek title “Christ,” frequently applied to Jesus. In this podcast episode, Tim and Jon discuss both this title and Jesus’ baptism, which the gospel writers depict as his anointing ceremony. Listen in as we explore the theme of the anointed in the New Testament and how Jesus’ followers become anointed ones too.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:06)Part two (11:06-29:04)Part three (29:04-42:59)Part four (42:59-1:08:52)Referenced ResourcesThe Acts of the Apostles: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary, Ben WitheringtonInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Sailing on a Flying Boat” by Enzalla“CluB waVes” by Tyler Bailey“Along the Yarra” by Stan ForebeeShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/17/20231 hour, 8 minutes, 51 seconds
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Firstborn Question and Response

Do the biblical authors consider women the second-born siblings of men? Were Joshua and Caleb rivals? Why is Korah, the disgraced rebel, honored in the Psalms? In this episode, Tim and Jon dive into your questions from the firstborn series. Thank you to our audience for your insightful questions!View more resources on our website →Timestamps Rijke from Japan (1:22)Ludy from the Netherlands) and Laura from Ireland (7:30)Craig from Australia (21:31)Daniel from Tennessee (25:02)Tara from Florida (30:19)Garrett from Texas (36:05)David from Massachusetts (40:32)Lizzie from Texas (48:38)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Audience questions compiled by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/12/202356 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Anointed King in Psalms – Anointed E5

David’s life gives us two parallel portrayals of what it means to be God’s anointed one: one is victorious—God’s anointed is the giant feller and the snake crusher. The other one is a suffering servant, waiting patiently in the wilderness for God’s deliverance. In today’s episode, join Tim and Jon in the Psalms, where they’ll explore both David’s victory and his suffering and discuss how Jesus saw himself living out both those roles too.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-14:03)Part two (14:03-27:37)Part three (27:37-40:38)Part four (40:38-59:28)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Mario Kart” by SwuM“Blessed Are the Merciful” by Beautiful Eulogy“Undefined Lights” by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/10/202359 minutes, 27 seconds
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Isaiah’s Anointed One – Anointed E4

David was Israel’s greatest king, but even he failed to live as God’s anointed one. When Isaiah prophesied about the ultimate anointed one to come, he said that not only would this deliverer come from the line of David, but they would be a new David altogether. What does this mean? Learn more in this episode as Tim and Jon discuss the theme of the anointed in the Isaiah scroll.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:57)Part two (11:58-30:00)Part three (30:00-46:20)Part four (46:20-1:06:16)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Flashback,” “Toofpick,” and “Bloom” by Blue Wednesday & ShopanShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/3/20231 hour, 6 minutes, 16 seconds
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Saul the Anti-Anointed – Anointed E3

Israel’s first anointed king, Saul, consistently makes choices that put him in conflict with God and the responsibilities God has entrusted to him. This turns Saul into the first anti-anointed one—or put another way, the first antichrist. In this episode, Tim and Jon explore the theme of anointing in the stories of Israel’s first two kings, Saul and David.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-13:01)Part two (13:01-28:45)Part three (28:45-47:05)Part four (47:05-1:08:21)Referenced ResourcesThe Serpent in Samuel: A Messianic Motif, Brian A. VerrettInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Never Felt the Same” by Sleepy Fish“Excellent” by Propaganda“Evening Flight” by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/27/20231 hour, 8 minutes, 21 seconds
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What’s So Special About Oil? – Anointed E2

What’s so special about oil? Why does the Bible specify that oil—not water or wine—must be used to anoint a person or place? In this episode, Tim and Jon continue discussing the biblical theme of anointing, exploring why God designates oil to symbolically represent the life-giving power of his Spirit.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-9:07)Part two (9:07-28:37)Part three (28:37-40:33)Part four (40:33-55:53)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Birth” by Mr. Käfer“Reliving” by No Spirit“Just Wanna Be Free” by Boonie MayfieldShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/20/202355 minutes, 52 seconds
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"Christ" Is Not a Name – Anointed E1

The title most often applied to Jesus is “the anointed one”—that’s what the Greek word “christ” means! But what is the practice of anointing? What does it signify, and who gets anointed? The practice of anointing people with oil is a theme we can trace throughout the entire story of the Bible. In this episode, Tim and Jon start a brand new theme study all about anointing.View more resources on our website →Timestamps Part one (00:00-21:48)Part two (21:48-36:43)Part three (36:43-49:12)Part four (49:12-57:23)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our entire library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“On the Moon” by SwuM“Issa Vibe” by Sam Stewart“On My Way (alt. version)” by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/13/202357 minutes, 22 seconds
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The Firstborn of Creation – Firstborn E10

In our final episode of the Firstborn series, we look at the New Testament’s description of Jesus as the firstborn of creation. Join Tim and Jon as they explore some of Paul’s letters, the book of Hebrews, and the Revelation, and discover how Jesus reveals who God is––and what it means to be truly human, too.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-14:29)Part two (14:29-25:26)Part three (25:26-48:43)Part four (48:43-1:08:38)Referenced ResourcesNew Testament Christological Hymns: Exploring Texts, Contexts, and Significance, Matthew E. GordleyThe Birth of the Trinity: Jesus, God, and Spirit in New Testament and Early Christian Interpretations of the Old Testament, Matthew BatesThe Letter to the Colossians (New International Commentary on the New Testament), Scot McKnightInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Take a Walk” by Tyler Bailey“Alone Time” by Sam Stewart“Long Lost Friend (alt version)” by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/6/20231 hour, 8 minutes, 38 seconds
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How Will Jesus Use His Power? – Firstborn E9

Under levitical law, touching anyone unclean would make you unclean too. But when Jesus touches people who are unclean, they get healed and become clean instead––it’s like his holiness is contagious. In this episode, Tim and Jon talk about the way Jesus uses his power and authority as the cosmic firstborn.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-19:35)Part two (19:35-31:19)Part three (31:19-46:15)Part four (46:15-1:03:45)Part five (01:03:45-1:12:51)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"The String That Ties Us" by Beautiful Eulogy"Peaches" by The Field Tapes & Philanthropy"Through Trees" by The Field Tapes & Sleepy FishSound design by Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/27/20231 hour, 13 minutes, 9 seconds
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God's Firstborn Son – Firstborn E8

The authors of the gospel accounts in the Bible—Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John—regularly refer to Jesus as the Son of God, a title that’s connected to the theme of the firstborn. In this episode, Tim and Jon explore what it means that Jesus is God’s Son through the stories of his baptism and testing in the wilderness. Listen in to find out how Jesus uses his power in a way we’ve never seen another human do before.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-12:44)Part two (12:44-26:31)Part three (26:31-40:14)Part four (40:14-54:41)Referenced ResourcesRichard B. HaysThe Gospel of Mark (The New International Greek Testament Commentary), R.T. FranceInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Colors Fade" by Sleepy Fish"BreaKmode" by Tyler Bailey"Catching the Wave" by Tyler Bailey & Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Lead Editor Dan Gummel and Editors Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/20/202354 minutes, 41 seconds
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David, the Latecomer King – Firstborn E7

In the scroll of Samuel, Israel demands a king in place of the judges that have been ruling over them. It sounds like a simple enough request, but Yahweh calls it idolatrous. Why? In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the motives behind Israel’s request and the role of Israel’s first kings, Saul and David, in the unfolding theme of the firstborn.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-20:32)Part two (20:32-38:25)Part three (38:25-48:35)Part four (48:35-1:02:35)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Lotus Tea" by Xihcsr"Just Jammin" byTyler BaileySound design by Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/13/20231 hour, 2 minutes, 35 seconds
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What Is God’s Name? – Re-Release in Honor of Michael Heiser

This episode is a special re-release of an interview we did in 2018 with Dr. Michael Heiser. Mike has been a significant influence to Tim’s own scholarship and, by extension, much of BibleProject’s content, as well as to thousands of other people. Mike is in the final stages of his battle with pancreatic cancer, and we want to honor his incredible life by sharing this episode again. View the original episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-18:05)Part two (18:05- 33:00)Part three (33:00-44:30)Part four (44:30-59:18)Referenced ResourcesOld Testament Theology, Gerhard von RadThe Genius of John: A Composition-Critical Commentary on the Fourth Gospel, Peter F. EllisThe Unseen Realm: Recovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible, Michael S. HeiserAngels: What the Bible Really Says About God's Heavenly Host, Michael S. HeiserInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Faith,” “In the Distance,” and “Moments” by Tae the ProducerIf you are interested in assisting the Heiser family with meal donations or in donating to help cover expenses in the coming weeks, please use this link. If you’d like to send a card to the Heiser family, you can write to the Awakening School of Theology. They will collect all cards and deliver them to the Heiser family.AWKNG School of TheologyP.O. Box 23621Jacksonville, FL 32241If you wish to donate directly to the Heisers via Venmo, search for their account at @Mike-Heiser-4.Show produced Dan Gummel and Jon Collins. Re-released with assistance from Producer Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder, Lead Editor Dan Gummel, and Editor Tyler Bailey. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/7/202359 minutes, 18 seconds
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Hannah’s Poem and Power Reversals – Firstborn E6

Hannah was an oppressed woman, scorned by her husband’s rival wife because of her barrenness. But the way she prayed and trusted Yahweh through this hardship became a remarkable example of how God works through the lowly to subvert human notions of power and status. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they trace the theme of the firstborn in the scroll of Samuel.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-9:59)Part two (09:59-27:27)Part three (27:27-46:11)Part four (46:11-1:03:54)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Downhill" by Leavv"The Birds Will Leave Soon" by fantompower"Shakshuka" by Philanthrope & mommyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/6/20231 hour, 3 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Plague of the Firstborn – Firstborn E5

How does the plague of the firstborn from Exodus fit into the biblical theme of the firstborn? And what does it mean when Yahweh calls Israel his firstborn son? In this episode, Tim and Jon explore the theme of the firstborn in the Exodus scroll.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-19:23)Part two (19:23-37:19)Part three (37:19-52:07)Part four (52:07-1:11:44)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Mitigating the Distance" by Xihcsr"Enclosed by You" by Liz Vice"Fallen Angel" by Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Lead Editor Dan Gummel. Edited by Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/30/20231 hour, 11 minutes, 44 seconds
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Power Grabs and Patriarchs – Firstborn E4

Early in the story of the Bible, God chooses the family of Abraham, his son Isaac, and Isaac’s son Jacob as his chosen representatives to bless other peoples. But these families are full of the same rivalry, envy, and division present in any other family. What is God doing with these less-than-ideal candidates? Join Tim and Jon as they trace the theme of the firstborn in the narratives of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:35)Part two (11:35-26:44)Part three (26:44-40:08)Part four (40:08-53:40)Part five (53:40-1:09:20)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Chilling at Last" by Emapea"Beautifully So" by less.people"Bloc" by KVSound design by contributorShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Lead Editor Dan Gummel. Edited by Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. Mixed by Tyler Bailey. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/23/20231 hour, 9 minutes, 19 seconds
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Rivalry Among Brothers – Firstborn E3

Only a few pages into the story of the Bible, the story starts to get really bleak. Cain kills his brother Abel, Cain’s descendants become famous murderers, and Noah’s youngest son violates his father and mother. And all of it happens because humans decide that power is worth the cost of harming others. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the dark side of human nature and the God who favors the powerless—the people who choose to trust him for blessing and exaltation.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-17:05)Part two (17:05-32:06)Part three (32:06-45:29)Part four (45:29-01:08:11)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience our full library of resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Hayride" by Florent Garcia and anbuu"Zero Point" by dryhope"Indifference" by Magnole & Ben Bada BoomShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/16/20231 hour, 8 minutes, 10 seconds
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Seizing vs. Receiving Power – Firstborn E2

It’s not explicitly stated, but the theme of the firstborn first appears in the opening narratives of the Hebrew Bible. In Genesis 1 and 2, Yahweh elevates humans, the latecomers of creation, to rule the land. In Genesis 3, a snake, who is some kind of spiritual being, tricks the humans despite their authority as God’s image bearers. This story is echoed in other accounts of sibling rivalry that continue throughout the Hebrew Bible. Join Tim and Jon as they discuss the land rulers and sky rulers and the theme of the firstborn in Genesis 1-3.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-14:38)Part two (14:38-36:14)Part three (36:14-55:26)Part four (55:26-01:07:43)Referenced ResourcesTraditions of the Bible: A Guide to the Bible As It Was at the Start of the Common Era, James L. KugelInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Maple Leaves" by Stan Forebee & Inf"In Between" by Enluv & Molly McPhaulStem from a license-free music libraryShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/9/20231 hour, 7 minutes, 42 seconds
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God's Response to Human Power Structures – Firstborn E1

In ancient Near Eastern societies, firstborn sons were prized above all other children and inherited special privileges and authority simply because of their birth order. In this episode, Tim and Jon start a new theme study covering the theme of the firstborn. Spoiler alert: The God of the Bible opposes lots of human ideas about power, and the privilege of the firstborn is no exception. Again and again, we’ll see Yahweh picking younger siblings and people we wouldn’t expect to be his chosen representatives.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-21:51)Part two (21:51-37:16)Part three (37:16-52:27)Part four (52:27-1:09:34)Referenced ResourcesZondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary, Clinton E. ArnoldInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Find Yourself" by Blue Wednesday and juniorodeo"Green Valley Trail" by Ruck P"Passing Storm" by Thomas Prime and ModeratorShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.
1/2/20231 hour, 9 minutes, 34 seconds
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Happy New Year From BibleProject!

We shared a lot of firsts together in 2022—from launching our first app, to reading the Torah movement by movement as an international community, to experiencing the Bible through new classes and videos. In our final episode of 2022, Tim, Jon, and BibleProject CEO, Steve, reflect on the year behind us and look forward to the years ahead.View full show notes from this episode →Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience all of our resources in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/26/202247 minutes, 11 seconds
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Simkhat Torah: Celebrating a Year of Reading

When a Jewish synagogue finishes reading through the Torah together, they celebrate Simkhat Torah. What is Simkhat Torah? Find out on today’s episode as Jon and Tim reflect on our year-long journey through the Torah and look ahead to the rest of the TaNaK.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-09:30)Part two (09:30-31:00)Part three (31:00-57:45)Part four (57:45-01:15:47)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Tzur Teudati” by Yaacov Alkobi“Simchu Na” by Hibba – Israeli Heritage Movement“For When it's Warmer” by Sleepy Fish“A Note From My Book” by Sleepy Fish and CoaShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/19/20221 hour, 15 minutes, 48 seconds
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When Do Words Become A Blessing? – Torah Q+R

How do we know the biblical authors intended to link certain words and stories? When do someone’s words become a blessing? How do sacrifices actually atone for sins? In this episode, Tim and Jon respond to audience questions from a year’s worth of conversations about the Torah. Thank you to our audience for your questions!View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps How Do We Know the Biblical Authors Used Hyperlinks? (1:19)When Do Words Become a Blessing? (13:47) Is the Genesis 3 Curse Part of a Covenant? (20:31)What’s the Significance of Passing Through the Waters? (27:58)Why Do Firstborns Have to be Redeemed? (35:36)How Do Sacrifices Atone for Sin? (46:50)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Audience questions compiled by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/12/20221 hour, 3 minutes, 15 seconds
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Which Laws Still Apply? – Deuteronomy Scroll Q+R

Which ancient Israelite laws still apply today and which don’t? Should the law be divided into moral, civil, and ceremonial categories? And why did Jesus quote Deuteronomy when Satan tempted him? In this episode, Tim and Jon respond to audience questions about the Deuteronomy scroll. Thanks to our incredible audience for your questions.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Which Laws Still Apply and Which Don’t? (1:30)Can Laws Be Categorized as Moral, Civil, and Ceremonial Rules? (12:52) Were Jesus and His Disciples Considered Sojourners Under the Law? (22:47)Why Did Jesus Quote Deuteronomy When Satan Tempted Him? (27:55)How Did Jesus Connect Idolatry and Adultery? (33:38)Did the Prophets Really Use Moses’ Song to Confront People? (37:48)How Many Covenants Did Yahweh Make with Israel? (44:38)Referenced ResourcesOld Testament Ethics for the People of God, Christopher J. H. WrightJohn H. SailhamerInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Audience questions compiled by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/5/202258 minutes, 10 seconds
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Moses’ Final Words – Deuteronomy E9

Who are Yahweh’s children? Up until the conclusion of the Torah, the answer to that question has appeared to be all of Israel. But in his final moments, Moses warns Israel that Yahweh’s true children are those who remain faithful to his covenant. In the final episode of our journey through the Torah, join Tim and Jon as they explore a prophetic poem that will set the tone for the rest of the TaNaK.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-23:25)Part two (23:25-48:13)Part three (48:13-01:01:53)Part four (01:01:53-1:19:19)Referenced ResourcesThe Violence of the Biblical God: Canonical Narrative and Christian Faith, L. Daniel HawkNaked Bible Podcast, Michael HeiserInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSTrack 1 by a contributor"Redefine Cutter" by Propaganda"Memories of When" by Shrimpnose"Catching the Tube" by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/28/20221 hour, 19 minutes, 19 seconds
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Can Anyone Live a Blessed Life? – Deuteronomy E8

Moses gives the least motivating pep talk ever in the third movement of Deuteronomy. He outlines God’s covenant and the various blessings and curses associated with it, and then he tells Israel, “You’re going to fail.” Talk about demoralizing! In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they explore the paradox of righteousness accomplished by divine sovereignty and human freedom through the lens of Deuteronomy and the New Testament writers.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:45)Part two (11:45-35:15)Part three (35:15-47:30)Part four (47:30-58:00)Part five (58:00-1:18:50)Part six (01:18:50-1:25:58)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Bird in Hand” by Beautiful Eulogy“Toonorth” AmbedoShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/21/20221 hour, 26 minutes, 1 second
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Covenant Curses – Deuteronomy E7

In the final movement of Deuteronomy, there’s a pretty lengthy list of curses that will fall upon Israel if they break their covenant with Yahweh. But what exactly is a curse? Why are there so many of them, and what do they have to do with Israel’s covenant with Yahweh? In this episode, Tim and Jon talk about blessings and curses, ancient Near Eastern law code, and the choice all humans have between death or life.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-18:28)Part two (18:28-40:25)Part three (40:25-58:02)Referenced ResourcesThe Context of Scripture: Canonical Compositions, Monumental Inscriptions, and Archival Documents from the Biblical World, William W. HalloInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“In Minutes” by Shrimpnose“I Won’t Wait for You (feat. Philanthrope)” by Psalm Trees and Guillaume MuschalleShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/14/202258 minutes, 2 seconds
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Jesus, Marriage, and the Law – Deuteronomy E6

The Pharisees frequently tested Jesus on his knowledge of the law, and in Matthew 19, they grill him on a particularly challenging law about divorce. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they wrap up the second movement of Deuteronomy by exploring Jesus’ understanding of the law and how it can help us interpret the Torah.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-12:00)Part two (12:00-35:00)Part three (35:00-55:00)Part four (55:00-1:09:51)Referenced ResourcesThe Aims of Jesus, Ben F. MeyerInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Truly Today” by Liz Vice“Fills the Skies” by Pilgrim“Cocoon” by AviinoShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/7/20221 hour, 9 minutes, 54 seconds
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How Do We Use the Law Today? – Deuteronomy E5

Israel’s laws were meant to form them into people of wisdom who lived differently than the nations around them. But what wisdom can Christians gain from the law? In this episode, listen in as Tim and Jon discuss the wisdom the apostles gleaned from the law.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-13:40)Part two (13:40-29:00)Part three (29:00-43:30)Part four (43:30-53:55)Referenced ResourcesCreated Equal: How the Bible Broke with Ancient Political Thought, Joshua A. BermanInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Conquer” by Beautiful Eulogy“Into the Past” by C Y G N“Where Peace and Rest Are Found” by GreyfloodShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/31/202253 minutes, 59 seconds
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What Do Moses and a Rock Have to Do With Jesus? – Numbers Q+R

Are numbers in the Hebrew Bible literal? Is it dangerous to adapt God’s laws? Does Israel’s conquest of Canaan justify other historical conquests? In this episode, Tim and Jon explore audience questions about the Numbers scroll. Thanks to our audience for your insightful questions.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Are Repeated Numbers Literal or Literary Embellishments? (1:20)Why Does Israel’s Population Decrease in Numbers? (16:25)What Does Jesus’ Title “The Rock” Have to Do with Moses? (21:45)Is it Dangerous to Adapt God’s Laws? (34:34)Does Israel’s Conquest of Canaan Justify Other Historical Conquests? (47:35)What’s With All the 10s and 2s? (52:22)What Are Some Resources for Seeing Edenic Themes in the Torah? (01:01:58)Referenced ResourcesAni Maamin: Biblical Criticism, Historical Truth, and the Thirteen Principles of Faith, Joshua BermanA Defense of the Hyperbolic Interpretation of Numbers in the Old Testament, David M. FoutsDeuteronomy 1-11 (The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries), Moshe WeinfeldJesus and the Land: The New Testament Challenge to "Holy Land" Theology, Gary M. BurgeUnsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery, Mark Charles, Soong-Chan RahThe Christian Imagination: Theology and the Origins of Race, William James JenningsInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Audience questions compiled by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/26/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 7 seconds
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The Law … Again – Deuteronomy E4

In the second movement of Deuteronomy, Moses gives Israel the law … again. But this time, he’s not talking to a nomadic group of people wandering the desert—he’s talking to the next generation preparing to settle in a permanent home for the first time. As they move into the land, their laws and their lives will need to look a little different. But in what way? In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they discuss how the law was always meant to form Israel (and modern readers) into people of wisdom, justice, and righteousness.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-19:35)Part two (19:35-34:39)Part three (34:39-50:46)Part four (50:46-1:13:08)Referenced ResourcesZondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary, Clinton E. ArnoldOld Testament Ethics for the People of God, Christopher J. H. WrightInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Valse," “Parasol,” and “Bronea” by Plusma and Guillaume MuschalleShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/24/20221 hour, 13 minutes, 8 seconds
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Giants and Justice – Deuteronomy E3

In this episode, we once again encounter the Nephilim, the evil demon-human hybrid beings we first met in Genesis 6. Now they resurface as giants inhabiting Canaan, the land Yahweh promised to Israel. Join Tim and Jon as they tackle the complex issues of violent conquest, human and spiritual evil, and divine justice.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-14:18)Part two (14:18-28:56)Part three (28:56-45:29)Part four (45:29-01:11:22)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"The Truth About Flight, Love, and BB Guns" by Foreknown"Radio Station" by Moby"Heal My Sorrows" by Grey FloodShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/17/20221 hour, 11 minutes, 22 seconds
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What Does Leviticus Teach Us About Jesus? – Leviticus Q+R

How do you clean a tabernacle? What does “laying of hands” represent? Is the scapegoat a hyperlink to Cain and Abel? How was it even possible for Israelites to follow the law? In this episode, Tim and Jon respond to your questions about the Leviticus scroll. Thanks to our audience for your insightful questions!View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps How Do You Clean a Tabernacle? (1:02)What Does “Laying of Hands” Represent? (9:06)Is the Scapegoat a Hyperlink to Cain and Abel? (14:26)What’s the Connection Between Abraham’s Two Sons and the Two Goats? (21:10)How Was It Possible To Follow the Law? (31:30)How Does Leviticus Change Our Understanding of Communion? (39:00)Do We Need the New Testament to “Get” Leviticus? (46:36)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo. Audience questions compiled by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/12/202258 minutes, 12 seconds
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The Way to True Life – Deuteronomy E2

In the first movement of Deuteronomy, two words appear more frequently than any others—listen and love. Why did Moses emphasize these two words in his farewell speech to Israel? In this episode, Tim and Jon explore what it looks like to be loyal to Yahweh, the God unlike any other, who listens to humanity.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:41)Part two (11:41-32:15)Part three (32:15-51:10)Part four (51:10-01:05:43)Referenced ResourcesA Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, Walter Bauer, William T. Arndt, Wilbur Gingrich, F. W. DankerInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“March 10th and a Third (Instrumental)" by JGivens"Eyes Aligning Stars Shining" by Xihcsr"Issa Vibe" by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/10/20221 hour, 5 minutes, 43 seconds
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What’s the Point of Deuteronomy? – Deuteronomy E1

Have you ever wondered where the earliest sermons in the Bible are found? Moses’ final speech to Israel, found in Deuteronomy, is the first time we see what is essentially a modern sermon—a long speech meant to communicate God’s truth. Just as Israel is about to enter the promised land, Moses reminds them that, just like their ancestors, they have the choice to live by their own wisdom or to follow Yahweh’s life-giving commands. Join Tim and Jon as they dive into the final scroll of the Torah and explore the choice before Israel—and the choice we face today too.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-20:00)Part two (20:00-40:38)Part three (40:38-1:02:14)Referenced ResourcesIntroduction to the Old Testament as Scripture, Brevard S. ChildsInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Praise through the Valley" by Tae the Producer"Happy Scene" by Sam StewartProduced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Annotations for our annotated podcast in our app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/3/20221 hour, 2 minutes, 13 seconds
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Entering the Promised Land – Numbers E9

After years of wandering in the wilderness and what seems like way too many rebellions against Yahweh, Israel has finally arrived on the edge of the promised land. What could possibly go wrong now? And yet even here, two of Israel’s tribes rebel, repeating the sins of Adam and Eve and dividing themselves from their brothers. Join Tim and Jon as they wrap up the Numbers scroll.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-20:20)Part two (20:20-33:50)Part three (33:50-43:29)Part four (43:29-01:01:21)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Solar Cove" by Mama Aiuto"Alone Time" by Sam StewartSound design by a contributorThis episode was produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. It was edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. MacKenzie Buxman provided the annotations for our annotated podcast in our app.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/26/20221 hour, 1 minute, 20 seconds
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Joshua: The New Adam and Moses – Numbers E8

As Moses’ death draws near, Yahweh selects Joshua to lead the people of Israel. What made Joshua uniquely qualified to lead? How does his leadership differ from Moses’? In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they discuss how the Hebrew Bible depicts Joshua as a new Adam, a new Moses, and a precursor to the Messiah himself.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-15:08)Part two (15:08-37:33)Part three (37:33-49:43)Part four (49:43-1:04:16)Referenced ResourcesThe Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament, Ludwig Koehler and Walter BaumgartnerInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“I Main Samus Now" by Sleepy Fish"Empty Me Out" by Liz Vice"I'll Pray for You" by XihcsrThis episode was produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. It was edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. MacKenzie Buxman provided the annotations for our annotated podcast in our app.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/19/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 15 seconds
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Five Women and Yahweh’s New Law – Numbers E7

In the third movement of Numbers, five sisters approach Moses with a legal case not covered in God’s laws: Without any brothers to inherit their father’s land, their family inheritance will be lost unless women are allowed to receive an inheritance too. Yahweh agrees with these five women, setting an important precedent for not just how Israel was to engage the laws of the Torah but for later followers of Jesus as well. Join Tim and Jon as they discuss the story of Zelophehad’s daughters and Jesus’ fulfillment of the law.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-19:55)Part two (19:55-33:05)Part three (33:05-55:24)Part four (55:24-01:12:30)Referenced ResourcesThe Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament, Ludwig Koehler and Walter BaumgartnerInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Long Lost Friend" by Sam Stewart"Limitless" by chromonicciSound design (untitled) by Tyler BaileyThis episode was produced by Cooper Peltz with Associate Producer Lindsey Ponder. It was edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey and Frank Garza. MacKenzie Buxman provided the annotations for our annotated podcast in our app.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/12/20221 hour, 11 minutes, 47 seconds
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Why Couldn’t Moses Enter the Promised Land? – Numbers E6

So far in the second movement of Numbers, the leaders of the twelve tribes of Israel have rebelled against Yahweh, the people themselves have rebelled against Yahweh, and even the Levites have rebelled against Yahweh. In fact, Moses, Aaron, Joshua, and Caleb are the only people that haven’t rebelled. So what happens when those closest to Yahweh fail to obey his word, too? In this episode, Tim and Jon talk about Moses’ rebellion, the high cost of leading God’s people, and humanity’s deep need for a more faithful representative to intercede on our behalf.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-14:55)Part two (14:55-39:37)Part three (39:37-55:08)Referenced Resources“Deir Alla Inscription”Interested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Spiritual Mind" by C Y G N"Easy Chair" by Tyler BaileyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/5/202255 minutes, 7 seconds
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Yahweh’s Judgment and Mercy – Numbers E5

God chose the Levites to take care of the tabernacle, and within the tribe of Levi, he picked Aaron’s family to have the special duty of offering sacrifices and burning incense. In Numbers 16, a Levite named Korah and 250 Israelite leaders accuse Aaron and Moses of setting themselves above everyone else. What’s going on here? In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the story of Korah’s rebellion, God’s judgment and mercy, and the responsibility of the leaders God chooses.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-7:24)Part two (7:24-27:40)Part three (27:40-42:47)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Wake Up” by xander.“The Size of Grace” by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/29/202242 minutes, 47 seconds
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Twelve Spies and the Promised Land – Numbers E4

We’re looking at a story about God’s chosen ones facing a test with fruit trees in a beautiful garden—sounds like Genesis 3, right? Surprisingly, this is a story from Numbers 13-15, with another tree and another test. In this episode, Tim and Jon dive into the second movement of Numbers and the choice Israel faces when they reach the border of the promised land. Will they choose to trust their wisdom or Yahweh’s?View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-17:24)Part two (17:24-33:01)Part three (33:01-51:10)Part four (51:10-1:04:11)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Sub Sandwich” by Tyler Bailey“Attack of the Clones” by JGivens (feat. John Givez and Jackie Hill Perry)Show produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/22/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 11 seconds
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There Isn’t a Law For That – Numbers E3

How do God’s people follow his will in situations where there are no explicit rules or laws given? At the conclusion of the third movement of Numbers, the Israelites don’t know how God wants them to respond to a situation. Join Tim and Jon as they explore Numbers 6-9 and how followers of Jesus today can learn to understand the will of God.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-19:22)Part two (19:22-32:42)Part three (32:42-45:40)Part four (45:40-01:06:50)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Evening Flight" by Sam Stewart"I Ain't Got an Answer" by Propaganda"Butterfly" by Sleepy FishShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/15/20221 hour, 6 minutes, 49 seconds
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What’s a Nazarite Vow? – Numbers E2

Confession of sins, strange water rituals, Nephilim, and Nazarite vows—Numbers 5 and 6 might feel like a confusing mix of laws, but the scroll’s author is cleverly reminding us of the Hebrew Bible melody we first encountered in Genesis 1-9. In this episode, Tim and Jon talk about four odd laws that are part of the intricate story we’ve been following through the Torah. View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-9:03)Part two (9:03-22:31)Part three (22:31-39:27)Part four (39:27-57:55)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Fizzle Pop" by Tyler Bailey"Goofy Nights in Tokyo" by Sam Stewart"Today Feels Like Everyday" by Mama AiutoShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/8/202257 minutes, 55 seconds
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What Made the Tribe of Levi Special? – Numbers E1

The scroll of Numbers can be difficult to make sense of without context, and there’s a reason for that. The scroll was never meant to be understood on its own. Numbers picks up where Leviticus leaves off and mirrors the scroll on the other side of Leviticus (Exodus). To fully understand all of these scrolls, we need to read them together. Join Tim and Jon as they dive into Numbers, trace the theme of the temple, and discuss the unique role of the tribe of Levi.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-22:02)Part two (22:02-40:55)Part three (40:55-58:55)Referenced Resources“Large Numbers in the Old Testament,” J. W. Wenham“A Defense of the Hyperbolic Interpretation of Large Numbers in the Old Testament,” David M. FoutsThe Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society (JETS)Interested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Library Card" by Sleepy Fish"Portland Synth Cruise" by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/1/202258 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Law of the Blasphemer – Leviticus E9

Blasphemy, principles of restitution, jubilee, exile, and the mercy and justice of God––it’s all there in the final lines of the scroll of Leviticus. Join Tim and Jon as they talk about the great gift and responsibility of carrying Yahweh’s name and discuss the wisdom and surprising hope of the Law that’s finally fulfilled in Jesus.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-18:22)Part two (18:22-31:17)Part three (31:17-44:54)Part four (44:54-1:08:33)Referenced ResourcesS. Tamar KamionkowskiInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Sails" by Strehlow & Aylior"Wonderful" by Beautiful Eulogy"A Bridge Between" by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/25/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 33 seconds
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What Israel's Feasts Teach Us – Leviticus E8

Are there specific times humans can meet with God in special ways? For ancient Israel, the answer was yes. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they explore the final movement of Leviticus, talk about the Sabbaths and festivals ancient Israelites celebrated every year, and discuss the significance of rituals and liturgies that allow us to see our time as a significant part of God’s story.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:49)Part two (11:49-40:12)Part three (40:12-01:00:19)Referenced ResourcesWho Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of the Book of Leviticus, L. Michael MoralesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Stomp" by Evil Needle"Movement" by FeltyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/18/20221 hour, 18 seconds
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Why Is the Sabbath So Important? – Leviticus E7

Throughout the Leviticus scroll, Yahweh instructs Israel, “Be holy as I am holy.” But what does that actually mean? As we enter into the third and final movement of Leviticus, we’ll find that living holy lives had everything to do with how Israel treated others and utilized their time, a theme reinforced by the continual command to honor the Sabbath. Join Jon and Tim as they explore the wisdom we can find in these ancient laws.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-15:18)Part two (15:18-32:43)Part three (32:43-48:12)Part four (48:12-01:08:13)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Alive" by Ouska"No Problem" (from a contributor)“Beneath the Cross" by EventideShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Tyler Bailey, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/11/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 12 seconds
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What Is the Day of Atonement? – Leviticus E6

At the center of the center of the Torah is the Day of Atonement. What is the significance of this day the biblical authors have placed at the heart of the Torah? What does this day accomplish? And what’s with the sacrificial goat and the scapegoat? In this episode, Tim and Jon explore the Day of Atonement and the ultimate atonement accomplished by Jesus on the cross.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-20:20)Part two (20:20-37:53)Part three (37:53-51:08)Part four (51:08-01:08:30)Referenced ResourcesSin, Impurity, Sacrifice, Atonement: The Priestly Conceptions, Jay SklarCult and Character: Purification Offerings, Day of Atonement, and Theodicy, Roy GaneInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Wanna Get Away with Me?" by Xihcsr"Pockets" (Artist Unknown)"Butterfly" by SwørnShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Tyler Bailey. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman and Ashlyn Heise.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/4/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 30 seconds
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Purity and Impurity in Leviticus – Leviticus E5

Childbirth, non-kosher food, sex, death, disease—they’re all considered impure in the book of Leviticus. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they discuss the levitical laws of purity and impurity and how they create a way for humanity to share in God’s own life and form a surprisingly beautiful backdrop for Jesus’ miraculous healings.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-10:50)Part two (10:50-28:04)Part three (28:04-44:35)Part four (44:35-01:05:32)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Harbor" by Stan Forebee & Francis"Protected" by Swørn"Acquired In Heaven" by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Tyler Bailey. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman and Ashlyn Heise.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/27/20221 hour, 5 minutes, 32 seconds
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Did God Try To Kill Moses? – Exodus Q+R

Why did God say he was going to kill Moses? What exactly was God’s test for Abraham on Mount Moriah and Israel on Mount Sinai? What’s the connection between the ten plagues and the ten commandments? In this episode, Tim and Jon respond to your questions about the Exodus scroll. Thanks to our audience for your incredible questions!View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps What Was God’s Test for Abraham on Mount Moriah and Israel on Mount Sinai? (00:00-31:57)What Can We Learn From the Genesis and Exodus Pharaohs? (31:57)Did God Try To Kill Moses? (37:46)Are There Other “Floods” Prevented by Intercessors? (47:35)What’s the Connection Between the Ten Plagues and Ten Commandments? (52:24)How Important Is Ancient Culture To Understanding Biblical Law? (55:18)Will We All Have Equal Access to God in the New Creation? (1:01:46)​​Following Up on the Test Involving Manna (01:09:57)Referenced ResourcesTo Climb or Not To Climb? Israel's Ascent in Exodus 19:12–13 (SBL 2012), Michael KibbeAbraham's Silence: The Binding of Isaac, the Suffering of Job, and How To Talk Back to God, J. Richard MiddletonThe Exodus You Almost Passed Over, Rabbi David FohrmanThe Lost World of the Torah: Law as Covenant and Wisdom in Ancient Context, John H. Walton and J. Harvey WaltonCreated Equal: How the Bible Broke with Ancient Political Thought, Joshua A. BermanInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Tyler Bailey. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/22/20221 hour, 12 minutes, 35 seconds
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The Dangerous Gift of God’s Presence – Leviticus E4

In the second movement of Leviticus, Aaron and his sons agree to the terms of their covenant with Yahweh, signing up to be the gatekeepers of Heaven and Earth. But then Aaron’s sons offer unholy fire before Yahweh—and then they die. What’s going on here? A seven-day ceremony of consecration and celebration ends with everything going terribly wrong. Join Tim and Jon as they kick off the second movement of Leviticus, discussing the theme of holiness and a very difficult part of the story.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-15:55)Part two (15:55-23:52)Part three (23:52-50:02)Part four (50:02-01:03:48)Referenced ResourcesArt and Faith: A Theology of Making, Makoto FujimuraInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Adieu” by Evil Needle“Drowning In You” by L'Indécis "Covet" by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Tyler Bailey. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman and Ashlyn Heise.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/20/20221 hour, 3 minutes, 48 seconds
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What Did the Burnt Offerings Really Mean? – Leviticus E3

What is the significance of the offerings described in Leviticus? In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they walk through the five offerings ancient Israelites made to Yahweh and see how the purpose of these practices sound a lot like the teachings of Jesus. Even here in Leviticus, Yahweh’s hope for his people is the same: love God and love your neighbor.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-9:01)Part two (9:01-24:26)Part three (24:26-33:20)Part four (33:20-52:37)Referenced ResourcesWho Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of the Book of Leviticus, L. Michael MoralesLeviticus: A Book of Ritual and Ethics, Jacob MilgromThe Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar WildeInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Educated Fool" by Jackie Hill Perry"Analogs" by GreyFloodSound design by Dan GummelShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Tyler Bailey. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman and Ashlyn Heise.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/13/202252 minutes, 36 seconds
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What Is Atonement? – Leviticus E2

A God who wants nothing more than to dwell with humanity, a way forward to a repaired relationship between Heaven and Earth, atoning sacrifices meant to communicate grace (not punishment)—you’ll find all of this in Leviticus. While the laws governing Israel’s sacrificial system can be some of the most challenging parts of the Bible to read, they’re an integral part of the unfolding story of the Bible. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the surprising beauty of sacrifice and atonement in the opening movement of Leviticus.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-8:01)Part two (8:01-17:00)Part three (17:00-46:24)Part four (46:24-1:13:16)Referenced ResourcesThe Temple: Its Symbolism and Meaning Then and Now, Joshua BermanWho Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord? A Biblical Theology of the Book of Leviticus, L. Michael MoralesAtonement and the Logic of Resurrection in the Epistle to the Hebrews, David M. MoffittInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Pieces (Instrumental)" by I AM FRESH MUSIC"You Can Save Me" by Beautiful Eulogy"The First Day (Instrumental)" by Hear the StoryShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Tyler Bailey. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman and Ashlyn Heise.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/6/20221 hour, 13 minutes, 15 seconds
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How God Reveals Himself in Leviticus – Leviticus E1

Holiness is a word we frequently associate with the Bible, but what does it mean? As we pick up the story from where we left off in Exodus, we find even Moses unable to enter God’s presence—and a whole bunch of laws about situations many of us have never considered. What is going on in the scroll of Leviticus? And why is it important? In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they dive into the first movement of the Leviticus scroll, where we’ll trace the theme of sacrifice.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-5:30)Part two (05:30-14:45)Part three (14:45-55:30)Part four (55:30-1:04:33)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Synth Groove” by Chase Mackintosh“Two for Joy” by Foxwood“Chilldrone” (Artist Unknown)Show produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Tyler Bailey. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by MacKenzie Buxman and Ashlyn Heise.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/30/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 34 seconds
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Two Takes on the Test at Mount Sinai –– Feat. Carmen Imes

Did Israel pass or fail God’s test at Mount Sinai? And what did Yahweh mean when he made Israel a “nation of priests”? In this episode, Tim and Jon talk with long-time friend and Hebrew Bible scholar Dr. Carmen Imes. Tim and Carmen share differing interpretive perspectives of the Exodus story, reminding us that the Bible is meant to be meditated upon and studied within a community.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-18:45)Part two (18:45-30:30)Part three (30:30-40:45)Part four (40:45-1:01:20)Referenced ResourcesBearing God's Name: Why Sinai Still Matters, Carmen Joy ImesBaker Commentary on the Old TestamentGodly Fear or Ungodly Failure?: Hebrews 12 and the Sinai Theophanies, Michael KibbeThe Pentateuch as Narrative: A Biblical-Theological Commentary, John H. SailhamerAbraham's Silence: The Binding of Isaac, the Suffering of Job, and How to Talk Back to God, J. Richard MiddletonCarmen Joy Imes, “The Lost World of the Exodus: Functional Ontology and the Creation of a Nation,” For Us, but Not to Us: Essays on Creation, Covenant, and Context in Honor of John H. Walton, edited by Miglio, Reeder, Walton, and WayInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Levitate,” “Nostalgia,” and “Nice and Easy” by Junior StateShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Podcast annotations for the BibleProject app by Hannah Woo and Ashlyn Heise.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/23/20221 hour, 1 minute, 21 seconds
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Why Moses Couldn’t Enter the Tabernacle – Exodus E10

In the second movement of Exodus, Moses walks straight into God’s fiery presence on Mount Sinai without fear. But by the end of the scroll, he can’t enter God’s presence. What changed? Right after confirming their covenant with Yahweh, Israel turns around and commits idolatry by making and worshiping a golden calf. It’s a choice that ruptures their relationship with Yahweh and even their connection to Moses. In this episode, join Jon and Tim as they explore the final portion of the third movement of Exodus.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-12:00)Part two (12:00-28:45)Part three (28:45-51:42)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“An Open Letter to Whoever’s Listening” by Beautiful Eulogy“Hello From Portland” by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/16/202251 minutes, 43 seconds
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Why Does the Tabernacle Furniture Even Matter? – Exodus E9

Why does God seem to care so much about the furniture within the tabernacle? The instructions for the tabernacle furniture are about far more than aesthetics. They were means of dealing with Israel’s moral brokenness, they served as reminders of Eden, and they were designed to form Israel into a people of perpetual surrender. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they continue to trace the theme of the temple in the third movement of Exodus.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-16:45)Part two (16:45-39:30)Part three (39:30-48:00)Part four (48:00-1:00:30)Referenced ResourcesThe Literary Structure of the Old Testament: A Commentary on Genesis-Malachi, David A. DorseyJacob MilgromInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Midsummer” by Broke In Summer“Day and Night” by Aiguille“Movement” by FeltyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/9/20221 hour, 30 seconds
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What’s So Special About the Tabernacle? – Exodus E8

You may have heard that God’s holiness keeps him from getting close to sinful humanity, but in the Bible we see God regularly doing the opposite, drawing near to dwell with human beings. We encounter this reality again and again, including in a surprising place—the tabernacle blueprints. In this episode, join Jon and Tim as they walk through the opening act of the third movement of Exodus and explore the relationship between the tabernacle, the garden of Eden, unconditional love, and eternal life.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-13:00)Part two (13:00-45:45)Part three (45:45-1:03:30)Part four (1:03:30-1:16:12)Referenced ResourcesPrayer of Saint IgnatiusInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Covet” by Beautiful Eulogy“Beautiful Eulogy” by Beautiful Eulogy“Come Alive” by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/2/20221 hour, 16 minutes, 18 seconds
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What Are the Ten Commandments All About? – Exodus E7

We often think of the ten commandments as a list of dos and don’ts—the things you need to know to make God happy. But is that what they’re really about? In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they take a deep dive into the ten commandments, and find out why they’re far less about simulating moral perfection than they are about preserving proper worship of Yahweh and the shared dignity of humans as his image bearers.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:00)Part two (11:00-28:50)Part three (28:50-1:02:00)Part four (1:02:00-1:10:11)Referenced ResourcesBearing God's Name: Why Sinai Still Matters, Carmen Joy ImesCowboy Ten CommandmentsInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Evening Flight” by Sam Stewart“Long Lost Friend” by Sam Stewart“Unidentified Lights” by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/25/20221 hour, 9 minutes, 44 seconds
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Testing at Mount Sinai – Exodus E6

Mount Sinai is the famous spot where Yahweh gives Moses the ten commandments—and the location where most of Exodus, all of Leviticus, and the first ten chapters of Numbers take place. When Israel first arrives at Sinai, they fail yet another test and try to get Moses to pass it for them. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they explore Yahweh’s fiery presence, the test at Sinai, and the question of Israel’s national identity: will they be the kingdom of priests Yahweh intends?View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:30)Part two (11:30-21:30)Part three (21:30-43:00)Part four (43:00-1:02:37)Referenced ResourcesThe Pentateuch as Narrative: A Biblical-Theological Commentary, John H. SailhamerInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Intermission” by Sam Stewart“That Happy Scene in Stranger Things” by Sam Stewart“Unidentified Lights” by Sam StewartShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.
4/18/20221 hour, 2 minutes, 37 seconds
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Israel Tests Yahweh – Exodus E5

The nation of Israel seems to go from one life-threatening situation to another in the Exodus scroll. From slavery in Egypt to being cornered between a hostile army and a vast body of water, Israel’s God has delivered them from everything so far. Now in the wilderness, they face a series of three tests. Will they trust Yahweh to deliver them again? In this episode, Tim and Jon explore Israel’s testing in the wilderness.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-9:05)Part two (9:05-25:45)Part three (25:45-44:10)Part four (44:10-55:30)Part five (55:30-1:11:21)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSBeneath Your Waves by Sleepy FishShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/11/20221 hour, 11 minutes, 20 seconds
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God Tests His Chosen Ones – Exodus E4

Nobody likes tests. But the test is a recurring pattern in the biblical story for how God relates to his chosen ones. So are humans just lab rats in a divine experiment, or is there something else going on? Join Tim and Jon as they talk about the theme of the test and the famous account of Israel crossing the Sea of Reeds, as we dive into the second movement of the Exodus scroll.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-14:30)Part two (14:30-20:25)Part three (20:25-33:30)Part four (33:30-49:50)Part five (49:50-1:02:37)Referenced ResourcesDictionary of the Old Testament: Pentateuch (The IVP Bible Dictionary Series), T. Desmond Alexander and David W. BakerBernard F. BattoInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSReflection by SwørnShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/4/20221 hour, 2 minutes, 36 seconds
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Why Are There 10 Plagues? – Exodus E3

The ten plagues––they’re fascinating, they’re famous, and they sometimes seem overly harsh. Where do they fit in the story of the Bible and the process of God revealing his own name and character? In this episode, Tim and Jon talk about the ten plagues, or ten acts of de-creation, in which Yahweh uses his power over creation to undo his own creation in judgment. Listen in as we explore how God’s response to evil reveals another layer of his character.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:15)Part two (11:15-24:15)Part three (24:15-44:45)Part four (44:45-01:00:03)Referenced ResourcesHebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament, Ludwig Koehler, Walter Baumgartner, M. E. J. Richardson, J. J. StammExodus: An Exegetical and Theological Exposition of Holy Scripture (Volume 2) (The New American Commentary), Douglas K. StewartInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"My Room Becomes The Sea" by Sleepy FishShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/28/20221 hour, 3 seconds
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Yahweh and the Exodus – Exodus E2

The story of the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt is famous for good reason—a burning bush, a transforming staff, 10 plagues, and the Passover. The exodus is also the story that defines God’s personal name, Yahweh. What does this narrative show us about Yahweh? And why does God care so much that people know his name? In this episode, Tim and Jon talk about God’s character revealed through his acts of deliverance and judgment.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-12:15)Part two (12:15-39:45)Part three (39:45-50:30)Part four (50:30-1:05:45)Referenced ResourcesThe Violence of the Biblical God, L. Daniel HawkThe Sentence in Biblical Hebrew, Francis I. AndersenInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Parkbench Epiphany” by AntimidasShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/21/20221 hour, 5 minutes, 45 seconds
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“God” Is Not a Name – Exodus E1

God is not a name—it’s a title. In fact, the God of the Bible introduces himself by a specific name in one of the most famous stories in the Bible, the exodus event, when he works through Moses and Aaron to deliver Israel from slavery in Egypt. In this episode, Tim and Jon dive into the first movement of the Exodus scroll and explore the theme of God’s name.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-12:15)Part two (12:15-23:45)Part three (23:45-46:30)Part four (46:30-1:05:28)Referenced ResourcesThe Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament, Ludwig Koehler, Walter Baumgartner, and Johann Jakob StammInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Field Studies, Vol. 1” by Chillhop MusicShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/14/20221 hour, 5 minutes, 28 seconds
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Why Can’t Jacob and Esau Both Be Blessed? – Genesis Q+R

How is Jesus the first-born of creation and the “second Adam”? Why are the biblical authors so obsessed with the east? And why can’t Jacob and Esau both be blessed? In this episode, Tim and Jon tackle your questions about the Genesis scroll.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Is Jesus Both the First-born and Chosen Second-Born? (1:27)Why Are the Biblical Authors Obsessed with the East? (7:00)Where Did Cain Find a Wife? (15:55)Who Are the Nephilim? (21:14)Does God Test Abraham Because He Banished Ishmael? (33:05)Why Can’t Jacob and Esau Both Be Blessed? (42:30)Referenced ResourcesGenesis: History, Fiction, or Neither?: Three Views on the Bible’s Earliest Chapters (Counterpoints: Bible and Theology), James K. Hoffmeier, Gordon J. Wenham, Kenton L. Sparks"And You Shall Tell Your Son...": The Concept of the Exodus in the Bible, Yair ZakovitchThe Blessing and the Curse, Jeff S. AndersonInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music“Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.  Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier. Podcast Annotations for the BibleProject app by Ashlyn Heise and Hannah Woo.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/7/20221 hour, 1 minute, 17 seconds
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Joseph the Suffering Servant – Genesis E8

He lays down his life to save a remnant of God’s people, he brings God’s blessing to all nations, he forgives those who tried to kill him, and his name is … Joseph? In this episode, Tim and Jon conclude our study of the Genesis scroll with a final look at the theme of exile. See how Joseph’s story becomes an important part of the Bible’s depiction of the ultimate suffering servant, Jesus the Messiah.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-6:30)Part two (6:30-17:00)Part three (17:00-33:20)Part four (33:20-44:49)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Cocktail Hour” by StrehlowShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/28/202244 minutes, 48 seconds
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Joseph the Exile – Genesis E7

Joseph is one of the Bible’s most famous characters, and in the Genesis scroll, his story is a climactic moment in the theme of exile that spans the whole book. In this episode, Tim and Jon dive into the fourth and final movement of Genesis, a narrative rich with patterns, repeated words, and the presence of God even in the pit.  View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-11:30)Part two (11:30-24:45)Part three (24:45-41:51)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Directions” by Blue Wednesday X ShopanShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/21/202241 minutes, 50 seconds
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Wrestling God for a Blessing – Genesis E6

Throughout the story of the Bible, God singles out different people, like Jacob, to be the conduit of his blessing to all humanity. But from birth, Jacob consistently acts more like the snake from the garden of Eden than a righteous chosen one of God. He lies his way into blessings that God had intended for him all along. So what will God do? In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the theme of blessing and curse in the life of Jacob.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-17:30)Part two (17:30-28:20)Part three (28:20-45:30)Part four (45:30-1:05:57)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.You can experience the literary themes and movements we’re tracing on the podcast in the BibleProject app, available for Android and iOS.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“The Great Escape” by Blue WednesdayShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/14/20221 hour, 5 minutes, 59 seconds
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Great Blessing and Great Responsibility – Genesis E5

The word “blessing” brings to mind a variety of images for all of us. But what exactly does it mean when God blesses someone? And where did the curse come from? In this episode, Tim and Jon start exploring the third movement of Genesis, tracing the theme of blessing and curse.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-18:35)Part two (18:35-37:40)Part three (37:40-51:30)Part four (51:30-1:01:42)Referenced ResourcesThe Blessing and the Curse: Trajectories in the Theology of the Old Testament, Jeff S. AndersonInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Endless Beginnings” by Smile High and Teddy RoxpinShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/7/20221 hour, 2 minutes, 42 seconds
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We'll Be Back Next Week!

Today would have been our 287th podcast episode. We haven’t missed a single week in seven years! Unfortunately, we won’t be able to release our next episode until a week from now, Monday, February 7th, when we will dive into the third movement of Genesis, focusing on the life of Jacob.This week take the time to explore our catalogue and listen to an episode you haven’t heard before. You can also listen to the podcast in our new app and check out our new interactive podcast feature. As you listen to podcast episodes on the app, you can access additional content (videos, articles, other podcast episodes, books) that relate to that episode as they pop up in real time. You can download the app for Android and iPhone.In preparation for the next theme we’re studying on the podcast, check out our series on Generosity, as well as an interview we shared a number of years ago called God and Money. It’s  the story of two Harvard business grads whose understanding of money and generosity was radically transformed by the Bible.
1/31/20221 minute, 52 seconds
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Trees of Testing and Blessing – Genesis E4

The family of Abraham is chosen by God. But despite God’s promises to them, they continually act out of greed, division, fear, deception, and lack of trust in Yahweh. How does God respond to this? What will he do to make sure his blessing comes to all nations? Join Tim, Jon, and Carissa as they continue tracing the theme of the tree of life in the second movement of Genesis.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-13:50)Part two (13:50-27:45)Part three (27:45-36:30)Part four (36:30-53:45)Part five (53:45-1:05:28)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“We Must Believe in Spring” by Psalm Trees & Guillaume MuschalleShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/24/20221 hour, 5 minutes, 26 seconds
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Under the Trees with Yahweh – Genesis E3

Blessing, testing, failure, success, God’s plan for the nations—you’ll find all these themes woven through the story of the Bible, often accompanied by … trees? While it might not seem obvious, trees play an important role in the Bible and, notably, in the life of Abraham. In this episode, join Tim, Jon, and Carissa as they dive into the second movement of Genesis and trace the theme of trees through the story of Abraham.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-08:25)Part two (08:25-20:26)Part three (20:26-27:28)Part four (27:28-38:00)Part five (38:00-50:20)Referenced ResourcesThe Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus, L. Michael MoralesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Invisible” by Philanthrope and mommyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/17/202250 minutes, 22 seconds
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God’s Spirit in the Flood Narrative – Genesis E2

When we think of God’s Spirit, judgment is probably not what comes to mind. But the biblical authors saw God’s Spirit as the one who gave life and took it away—the one who could create, de-create, and recreate. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa follow the theme of God’s Spirit through the second half of the first movement of Genesis.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-10:20)Part two (10:20-29:00)Part three (29:00-35:00)Part four (35:00-43:30)Part five (43:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Meraki” by Juan RiosShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/10/202259 minutes, 45 seconds
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God’s Spirit in Creation – Genesis E1

Why does the author of Genesis make a point to name God’s Spirit in Genesis 1 and 2? In this week’s episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa embark on a new journey for the BibleProject podcast—reading the Bible in thematic movements, starting with a close look at the Holy Spirit’s role in the book of Genesis.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-10:00)Part two (10:00-23:00)Part three (23:00-39:00)Part four (39:00-50:00)Part five (50:00-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Wanderlust” by MakzoShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/3/202256 minutes, 18 seconds
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BibleProject in 2021 and Beyond

In the final episode of the year, Tim, Jon, Carissa, and the CEO of BibleProject, Steve, reflect on our journey together in 2021 and look forward to some exciting plans for 2022 and beyond. Thank you to all of our listeners and supporters for your generosity and for joining us as we experience the Bible together.View full show notes from this episode →Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/27/202118 minutes, 34 seconds
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Applying the Paradigm: Movements and Links

How do we apply the biblical paradigm to our own Bible reading? It starts with reading the Bible in movements—the thematic patterns in which the biblical authors organized their ideas long before chapters and verse numbers were printed. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa introduce us to biblical movements and walk through how to identify and trace biblical themes on our own.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-14:00)Part two (14:00-19:45)Part three (19:45-29:30)Part four (29:30-37:45)Part five (37:45-48:00)Part six (48:00-57:21)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Into the Past” by CYGN“Me.So” by Mind Your Time“Invisible” by Philanthrope & mommy“Alive” by OuskaShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/20/202157 minutes, 22 seconds
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Is the Bible Trustworthy? – Paradigm Q+R #2

How do we teach the Bible to our children? How can a book written by humans be divinely authoritative? Is the Bible historically accurate? In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa wrap up the Paradigm series by responding to your questions!View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps How Do We Teach the Bible to Our Children? (1:01)Are the Epistles Meditation Literature? (15:54)Can Anyone Understand the Bible? (25:45)How Do We Help Our Churches Learn How to Read the Bible? (32:32)How Can a Book Written by Humans Be Divine? (41:44)Is the Bible Historically Accurate? (51:32)Referenced ResourcesThe Jesus Storybook BibleWestminster Confession of Faith (Section 1.7 is referenced in this episode.)Interested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.  Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/13/20211 hour, 8 minutes, 28 seconds
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How (Not) To Read the Bible – Feat. Dan Kimball

What do we do with the passages in the Bible that are really difficult? Violence, slavery, the treatment of women—what the Bible has to say about these topics has, at times, been misinterpreted and misused. Join Tim, Jon, Carissa, and special guest Dan Kimball as they discuss his book, How (Not) to Read the Bible, and explore how any topic in the Bible looks different when we see it as part of a unified story.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-15:20)Part two (15:20-26:40)Part three (26:40-44:00)Part four (44:00-57:14)Referenced ResourcesHow (Not) to Read the Bible: Making Sense of the Anti-Women, Anti-Science, Pro-Violence, Pro-Slavery, and Other Crazy-Sounding Parts of Scripture, Dan KimballGregory KouklJohn H. WaltonMere Christianity, C. S. LewisA History of God: The 4,000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, Karen ArmstrongInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Cycles” by SwuMShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/6/202156 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Last Pillar: Communal Literature – Paradigm E11

Are there ways to read the Bible other than a private quiet time? For most of Church history, followers of Jesus read the Bible out loud in groups and passed along its message verbally. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa talk about what it means for the Bible to be communal literature and how knowing that might just change the way we experience it today.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-9:30)Part two (9:30-13:45)Part three (13:45-21:30)Part four (21:30-31:30)Part five (31:30-47:30)Part six (47:30-55:30)Part seven (55:30-1:02:25)Referenced ResourcesEarly History of the Alphabet, Joseph NavehThe JPS Torah Commentary: Deuteronomy, Jeffrey H. TigayScripture and Its Interpretation: A Global, Ecumenical Introduction to the Bible, Michael J. GormanInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Uncut Gems” by Mezhdunami“Dreams (Instrumental)” by Xander“Like the Sky, or Something Else” by Sleepy Fish“Life” by KVShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Zach McKinley, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/29/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 26 seconds
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What the Bible’s Authors Took for Granted – Paradigm E10

Have you ever figured out halfway through a conversation that you and another person were on totally different pages? Reading the Bible can feel like this at times. We’re all products of our cultures, families, and environments, and it affects how we understand others. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa prepare us for a cross-cultural conversation with the Bible by discussing the cultural values of the biblical authors.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-13:20)Part two (13:20-25:30)Part three (25:30-41:15)Part four (41:15-48:00)Part five (48:00-59:45)Part six (59:45-1:10:33)Referenced ResourcesThe Biblical Cosmos: A Pilgrim's Guide to the Weird and Wonderful World of the Bible, Robin A. ParryApostle of the Crucified Lord: A Theological Introduction to Paul and His Letters, Michael J. GormanPaul and the Gift, John M.G. BarclayInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Scream” by Moby“Euk’s First Race” by David Gummel“Where Peace and Rest Are Found” by Greyflood“Mood” by Lemmino“A New Year” by Scott BuckleyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, Zach McKinley, and Frank Garza. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/22/20211 hour, 10 minutes, 38 seconds
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The Bible Wasn’t Written in English – Paradigm E9

What makes the biblical languages so important? Because the Bible was written in another time and culture, we need to honor its ancient historical context and original languages as we read and study it. In this week’s podcast episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa explore why an awareness of the Bible’s culture––and our own––can help us be better interpreters of the Bible.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-15:00)Part two (15:00-20:30)Part three (20:30-33:15)Part four (33:15-44:45)Part five (44:45-58:37)Referenced ResourcesThe Epic of Eden: A Christian Entry into the Old Testament, Sandra L. RichterMisreading Scripture with Western Eyes: Removing Cultural Blinders to Better Understand the Bible, E. Randolph Richards and Brandon J. O’BrienMisreading Scripture with Individualist Eyes: Patronage, Honor, and Shame in the Biblical World, E. Randolph Richards and Richard JamesA Theory of Semiotics, Umberto EcoReading the Bible Intertextually, Richard B. Hays, Stefan Alkier, Leroy A. HuizengaInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Imagination” by Montell Fish“Smith the Mister” by Ohayo“Two for Joy” by Foxwood“Bloc” by KVShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/15/202158 minutes, 38 seconds
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Wisdom for Life’s Complexity – Paradigm E8

As followers of Jesus, how can we know we are making the “right” choice in situations the Bible doesn’t address? How can we know the difference between what’s good and bad? In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa talk about the Bible’s purpose as wisdom literature designed to reveal God’s wisdom to humanity––even for complex circumstances it doesn’t explicitly address.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0-13:20)Part two (13:20-19:45)Part three (19:45-31:00)Part four (31:00-43:15)Part five (43:15-55:20)Part six (55:20-1:01:50)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Loving Someone You Lost” by The Field Tapes“Vexento” by Yesterday on Repeat“Everything Fades to Blue” by Sleepy FishShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/8/20211 hour, 1 minute, 49 seconds
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Inspiration, Quiet Time, and Slaying Your Giants – Paradigm Q+R #1

How were the books of the Bible selected? What should we do if we have a hard time reading the Bible? How does the Bible apply to daily life? In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa respond to your questions from the Paradigm series so far. Thanks to our audience for all your incredible questions!View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Do Christians Need To Have a Daily Quiet Time? (0:38)What’s the Difference Between Inspired and Inerrant? (9:57)What Bible Did Jesus Use? (31:09)Should We Call the Bible the Word of God? (37:14)Should the Apocryphal Books Be in the Protestant Bible? (45:40)What About the JEDP Theory? (55:52)How Should We Apply Scripture to Our Lives? (1:03:30)What Do You Do if the Bible Was Used Against You? (1:09:20)Referenced ResourcesThe Chicago Statement on Biblical InerrancyFive Views on Biblical Inerrancy (Counterpoints: Bible and Theology), J. MerrickThe Pentateuch: International Perspectives on Current Research, Thomas DozemanParadigm Change in Pentateuchal Research, Matthias Armgart“Was the Documentary Hypothesis Tainted by Wellhausen’s Antisemitism?,” Alan T. LevensonInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.  Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/1/20211 hour, 19 minutes
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In the Beginning – John 1

The apostle John is the most poetic of the Gospel storytellers, but what is he really communicating with his beautiful, imagery-laden language? Join Tim, Jon, and Carissa for a closer look at John 1 and discover how John incorporates elements of the Genesis and Exodus narratives to form a portrait of how God responds to rebellious people.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0-13:15)Part two (13:15-24:45)Part three (24:45-37:30)Part four (37:30-48:00)Part five (48:00-54:00)Part six (54:00-1:01:17)Referenced ResourcesDavid Andrew Teeter, Hebrew Bible scholarWilliam Arthur Tooman, Hebrew Bible scholarGod Dwells with Us: Temple Symbolism in the Fourth Gospel, Mary L. ColoeJohn (Word Biblical Commentary Volume 36), George R. Beasley-MurrayThe Jewish Temple: A Non-Biblical Sourcebook, C. T. R. HaywardInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Day and Night” by Aiguille“Movement” by FeltyShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/25/20211 hour, 1 minute, 10 seconds
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Literature for a Lifetime – Paradigm E6

What’s the ideal way to study the Bible? Is it 20 minutes of reading every morning or larger blocks of time throughout the week? In this episode, join Tim, Jon, and Carissa as they discuss what it means for the Bible to be ancient Jewish meditation literature. The biblical authors never intended for it to be understood in one sitting, but over the course of a lifetime of re-reading.View full show notes from this episode →TimestampsPart one (0-19:30)Part two (19-30-32:00)Part three (32:00-46:00)Part four (46:00-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.David Andrew Teeter, Hebrew Bible scholarShow Music“Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Acedotes” by MakzoShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/18/202155 minutes, 10 seconds
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Who Is the Bible About? – Paradigm E5

Is the story of the Bible about humans or God? Because the Bible is about the Messiah—the God who became human—it’s about both God and humans. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa discuss how the story of the Bible and all of its main themes come to their fulfillment in Jesus, making it a story that’s personal but not private, a redemption story for all of us.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00 - 16:45)Part two (16:45 - 31:00)Part three (31:00 - 46:30)Part four (46:30 - End)Referenced ResourcesThe Liberating Image: The Imago Dei in Genesis 1, J. Richard MiddletonDavid Andrew Teeter, Hebrew Bible scholarInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“On a Walk” by FantompowerShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/11/202155 minutes, 43 seconds
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How the New Testament Came To Be – Paradigm E4

At first glance, the New Testament can seem wildly different from the Old Testament––but is it? Jesus saw himself as the fulfillment of the Hebrew Scriptures and the climax of the story that began thousands of years before his birth. In this episode, join Tim, Jon, and Carissa as they explore the unity of the New Testament and the intricate yet consistent storyline of the Bible.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-10:40)Part two (10:40-23:30)Part three (23:30-34:50)Part four (34:50-End)Referenced ResourcesThe Canon of the New Testament: Its Origin, Development, and Significance, Bruce M. MetzgerThe Question of Canon: Challenging the Status Quo in the New Testament Debate, Michael J. KrugerAll Things New: Revelation As Canonical Capstone, Brian J. TabbThe Oxford Handbook of ChristologyInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Day One” by Deric Torres“Day Two” by Deric Torres“Temple Garden” by BVGShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/4/202152 minutes, 39 seconds
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The Bible had Editors? – Paradigm E3

How can a collection of ancient manuscripts written by numerous people over thousands of years tell one unified story? In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa dive into how the Bible was written and how such a diverse collection of authors, literary styles, and themes can form one divinely inspired, unified story.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00 - 13:30)Part two (13:30 - 22:00)Part three (22:00 - 36:00)Part four (36:00 - 45:40)Part five (45:40 - end)Referenced ResourcesThe Shape of the Writings (Siphrut: Literature and Theology of the Hebrew Scriptures), Julius Steinberg and Timothy J. StoneThe Journey from Texts to Translations: The Origin and Development of the Bible, Paul D. WegnerLee Martin McDonald’s collected worksDominion and Dynasty: A Theology of the Hebrew Bible, Stephen G. DempsterThe Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible's Grand Narrative, Christopher J. H. WrightInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Aftersome" by ToonorthShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/27/202158 minutes, 5 seconds
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Who Wrote the Bible? – Paradigm E2

How does God work in the world and communicate with humanity? In this episode, Tim and Jon explore God’s relationship with his creation and the relationship between the Bible’s divine and human origins. They also discuss how God uses human words to communicate his divine word.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-16:30)Part two (16:30-31:30)Part three (31:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Birth” by Mr. Käfer“Tending The Garden (feat. Kennebec)” by Stan Forebee Show produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/20/202152 minutes, 27 seconds
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How Do You Read the Bible? – Paradigm E1

Have you ever read the Bible and felt like you’re not “getting it” or that you’re not connecting with God? In this episode, Tim and Jon take a look at the (often unhelpful) paradigms through which we interact with Scripture. They explore how seeing the Bible as a unified story that leads to Jesus not only gives the Bible space to do what it was created to do, but frees us up to be transformed by the story it’s telling.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-15:00)Part two (15:00-27:00)Part three (27:00-39:00)Part four (39:00-52:00)Part five (52:00-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.A Greek-English Lexicon, Henry George Liddell and Robert Scott, edited by Henry Stuart JonesShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Evil Needle” by Sound EscapesShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/13/20211 hour, 4 minutes, 57 seconds
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Hyperlinks and Patterns in Jonah – Jonah E3

What makes a person worthy to be chosen by God to do his work? In the story of the Bible, some of God’s choices seem obvious, people with lots of merit. Other times, his rationale is less clear to us––as with Jonah, a chosen one who might be worse than the people he was supposed to help. In this episode, listen in as Tim describes the biblical design pattern of the chosen righteous intercessor. This is a sneak peek into our free graduate-level course on Jonah, which will be featured in the new Classroom resource available in 2022. View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-16:35)Part two (16:35-22:30)Part three (22:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Jonah class session notes, including the handout “How to Read a Text Like the Hebrew Bible” (page 5)Jonah: A Literal-Literary Translation, Tim MackieClassroom ApplicationShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Keep an Open Mind” by Olive MusiqueShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/6/202154 minutes, 36 seconds
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Jonah's Literary Context – Jonah E2

The Hebrew Bible contains one story of human failure after another, leaving us with no doubt in our minds: humanity desperately needs a leader. In this episode, Tim walks us through the structure of the Hebrew Bible and how it shows us Jonah is an anti-leader, the opposite of what humanity needs, whose failure prepares us for the ultimate leader and Savior, Jesus. This is a sneak peek into our free graduate-level course on Jonah, which will be featured in the new Classroom resource available in 2022.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-19:40)Part two (19:40-27:30)Part three (27:30-42:30)Part four (42:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Jonah class session notes, including the handout “How to Read a Text Like the Hebrew Bible” (page 5)Jonah: A Literal-Literary Translation, Tim MackieThe Wisdom of Ben Sira (which Tim mentions in part one) is a deuterocanonical work of biblical theology written shortly before the Maccabean Revolt.Classroom ApplicationShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Keep an Open Mind” by Olive MusiqueShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/30/202153 minutes, 48 seconds
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Our Assumptions About Jonah – Jonah E1

A stubborn prophet, a wicked nation, a giant fish––the story of Jonah is frequently translated into the popular imagination through TV and movies. But what is it really about? In this episode, learn from Tim about where Jonah fits into the story of the Bible that ultimately points to Jesus. This is a sneak peek into our free graduate-level course on Jonah which will be featured in the new Classroom resource available in 2022.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-18:05)Part two (18:05-28:30)Part three (28:30-37:00)Part four (37:00-44:30)Part five (44:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Jonah class session notes, including the handout “How to Read a Text Like the Hebrew Bible” (page 5)Jonah: A Literal-Literary Translation, Tim MackieClassroom ApplicationShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Keep an Open Mind” by Olive MusiqueShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/23/202154 minutes, 5 seconds
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The Most Quoted Verse in the Bible — Top 5: Re-Release E5

Does God hold children responsible for their parents’ sins? In the fifth installment of our most-listened-to podcast episodes, join Tim, Jon, and Carissa for a look at the most quoted verse in the Bible, Exodus 34:6-7, and find out why God’s justice and his loyal love go hand in hand as a central part of who he is.QUOTEIf later generations repeat or persist in the covenant rebellion of their ancestors, they’re going to get the same consequences. But when we talk about these “thousands” that get loyal love, we’re talking about thousands of generations who stay faithful to the covenant. No generation gets a free pass, but no generation will be treated unjustly. Their own behavior matters for how God responds to them.Show produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Remastering by Jake Trethaway. Show notes by Camden McAfee and Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.Original episode and show notes are available here.
8/16/202158 minutes, 3 seconds
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What Does the Word "Gospel" Mean — Top 5: Re-Release E4

The word “gospel” has acquired many meanings since the biblical authors first used it. What does it really mean? In the fourth of our five most-listened-to podcasts, Tim and N.T. Wright discuss the meaning of this important word in its original context, and explore what it means for Jesus to take charge as King and for his disciples to build his Kingdom.QUOTEWhen God takes charge, he doesn’t send in the tanks, he sends in the meek and the poor and the hungry-for-justice, the merciful, the peacemaking, etc. And by the time the people with the tanks and the guns have realized what’s going on, the meek and the merciful and the poor in spirit have established schools and orphanages and hospitals, in order to show what it looks like when God becomes King. At Jesus’ final return, all those things will be part of God’s new world because they were already beginning at Jesus’ first coming.Show produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.Original episode and show notes are available here.
8/9/20211 hour, 13 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Restless Craving for Rest––Top 5: Re-Release E3

Earn it, lose it, take it, spend it, save it––we talk about time like currency. The Sabbath can be confusing to talk about, but it is God’s reminder to humanity that time is not a possession. In the third of our five most-listened-to podcasts, join Tim and Jon as they explore why the Sabbath is far less about a weekend or special religious service and far more about rescue and God’s miraculous provision.QUOTETo say that the Sabbath belongs to God is to jar you into remembering time doesn’t belong to us. We talk about time like it’s currency––earn it, lose it, take it, spend it, save it. It’s like one of our possessions. Shabbat is a ritual practice that determines reality and helps us renounce our autonomy. The seventh day reminds us of rescue, miraculous provision, and of God coming through for us in a way that we couldn’t do ourselves.Show produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.Original episode and show notes are available here.
8/2/202157 minutes, 45 seconds
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Humans Are...Trees? — Top 5: Re-Release E2

Humans are like trees. While this thought might not have been at the top of your mind this week, it was a key idea for the biblical authors. In the second of our five most popular podcasts, explore the connection between humans and trees with Tim and Jon as we learn why trees are mentioned more times than almost anything else in the Bible. QUOTEIf you look at days three and six, you’ll see they both have two creative acts. The second creative act on day three is a fruit tree, and on day six it’s a fruitful human. This is designed in such a way that you now start thinking in the metaphor, “Humans are trees.” … People are like trees, which means the future of humans—their origins and their destinies—are going to be linked in some way. We’re meant to wonder if the future of humans will be bound up with the future of trees.Show produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Remastering by Jake Trethaway. Show notes by Camden McAfee and Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.Original episode and show notes are available here.
7/26/20211 hour, 8 minutes, 44 seconds
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Intro to Biblical Law — Top 5: Re-Release E1

God’s law––it can be an intimidating topic. Why are there over 600 laws? What do we do with them? We’re re-releasing our five most popular podcasts, and the episode with the most listens is also the first one we ever recorded. Listen in as Tim and Jon unpack what the laws meant for ancient Israel and what they mean for us today.Show produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Remastering by Jake Trethaway. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.Original episode and show notes are available here.
7/19/202150 minutes, 53 seconds
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Timelines, Dinosaurs, and the Purpose of Creation – Ancient Cosmology Q+R

Are Genesis 1 and 2 literal? What’s up with the differing timelines in those chapters? Where are the dinosaurs in the Bible? How do you know what ancient Hebrew words really meant? In this episode, Tim and Jon tackle your questions from the Ancient Cosmology series. Thanks to our audience for all your incredible questions!View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps How Can You Know the Correct Meaning of Ancient Words? (5:52 - 12:06)Can You Understand the Bible Without Other Resources? (12:06 - 21:04)What Is the Purpose of Creation in Genesis 1-2? (21:04 - 28:45)Are Genesis 1 and 2 Literal? (28:45 - 42:14)Where Are Dinosaurs in the Bible? (42:14 - 49:24)How Did Other Biblical Authors Interpret Genesis 1 and 2? (49:24 - 55:30)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.John H. Walton, The Lost World of Genesis One: Ancient Cosmology and the Origins DebateJohn H. Walton, The Lost World of Adam and Eve: Genesis 2-3 and the Human Origins DebateRobin A. Parry, The Biblical Cosmos: A Pilgrim's Guide to the Weird and Wonderful World of the BibleAlister McGrath (multiple works on the intersection of Christian and scientific cosmology)John Polkinghorne (multiple works on the intersection of Christian and scientific cosmology)Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Dan Gummel, Zach McKinley, and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.  Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/12/202158 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Genealogical Adam and Eve – Feat. Dr. S. Joshua Swamidass

Did humans originate by intelligent design or the process of evolution? This question has been debated by the scientific community and readers of Genesis for almost 200 years. In this episode, join Tim, Jon, and special guest Dr. S. Joshua Swamidass as they discuss human origins and a way to bridge the gap across such a significant debate.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0-20:40)Part two (20:40-35:00)Part three (35:00-47:30)Part four (47:30-59:00)Part five (59:00-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Saint Augustine of Hippo, The Literal Meaning of GenesisDr. S. Joshua Swamidass, The Genealogical Adam and Eve: The Surprising Science of Universal AncestryWilliam Lane Craig, In Quest of the Historical Adam: A Biblical and Scientific ExplorationDavid Reich, Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human PastDennis R. Venema and Scot McKnight, Adam and the Genome: Reading Scripture After Genetic ScienceShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSChillhop Timezones Vol 2 Nostalgia Soviet Jazz BeatsShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/5/20211 hour, 10 minutes, 40 seconds
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Even Chaos Praises God – Psalm 148

It’s easy to recognize the psalms as beautiful poems. But how do we understand their deeper meaning? How psalms are organized (both internally and within the book of Psalms) is just as significant to their meaning as the words themselves. In this episode, join Tim, Jon, and Carissa for a deep dive into Psalm 148, where we see Yahweh as the ideal king who restores order to all creation. View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00-8:30)Part two (8:30-16:45)Part three (16:45-26:00)Part four (26:00-37:30)Part five (37:30-46:00)Part six (46:00-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Psalm 148” by Poor Bishop Hooper: Show produced by Dan Gummel, Zack McKinley, and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. 
6/28/20211 hour, 7 minutes, 31 seconds
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Genesis 1-2: Origins or Identity? – Feat. Dr. John Walton

How compatible is the Bible with science? And why does the creation story look different between Genesis 1 and 2? In this episode, join Tim, Jon, and special guest Dr. John Walton as they discuss these questions and the necessity of studying ancient culture and cosmology to truly understand our Bibles today.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0-14:30)Part two (14:30-25:00)Part three (25:00-35:20)Part four (35:20-48:20)Part five (48:20-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.The BioLogos FoundationThe Faraday Institute for Science and ReligionShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSChillhop Essentials Summer 2021 EPShow produced by Dan Gummel, Zack McKinley, and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/21/202159 minutes, 9 seconds
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Rivers Flowing Upward – Ancient Cosmology E5

What does it mean that the biblical authors expected the return of Eden? The prophets anticipated waters of life from God would do miraculous things like restore the barren Dead Sea region to its former lush state and unite all humanity. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they follow the waters of life from Genesis 1-2 throughout time, in anticipation of the coming Day of the Lord.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0-11:15)Part two (11:15-28:30)Part three (28:30-35:45)Part four (35:45-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Eric Mack, “New Science Suggests Biblical City of Sodom Was Smote by an Exploding Meteor,” Forbes Magazine, December 2018Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Solar Cove” by Mama AiutoChillhop Essential Summer 2021 EP“Imagination” by Montell FishShow produced by Dan Gummel, Zack McKinley, and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/14/202145 minutes, 31 seconds
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One Creation Story or Two? – Ancient Cosmology E4

Are there two creation stories in Genesis? How do Genesis 1 and 2 fit together and into the rest of the biblical story? In this episode, Tim and Jon explore these questions and the theme of water in the opening chapters of the Bible. Yahweh’s transformation of the chaos waters into waters of life set the stage for his calling upon his people and an important theme that will carry us from Genesis to Revelation.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-9:20)Part two (9:20-13:45)Part three (13:45-26:50)Part four (26:50-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.L. Michael Morales, Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of the Book of LeviticusL. Michael Morales, Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and ExodusShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Canary Forest” by Middle School, Aso, AviinoShow produced by Dan Gummel, Zach McKinley, and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/7/202140 minutes, 18 seconds
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The Greatest Elohim – Ancient Cosmology E3

The biblical authors often use creation imagery that clearly didn’t come from Genesis 1. Did they borrow from the creation accounts of other cultures? In this episode, join Tim and Jon for a deep dive into Genesis 1:1-2 and discover its similarity to other ancient cosmologies, plus one key difference: Yahweh is infinitely greater than all other gods.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-9:00)Part two (9:00-26:00)Part three (26:00-40:00)Part four (40:00-50:00)Part five (50:00-56:30)Part six (56:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.L. Michael Morales, Tabernacle Prefigured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and ExodusGeorge Landes, Creation Traditions in Proverbs 8 and Genesis 1John Sailhamer, Genesis Unbound: A Provocative New Look at the Creation AccountShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Synth Groove” by An Awesome Supporter“Feather” by Waywell“Luvtea” by Autumn Keys“Bloc” by kv“Mind Your Time” by me.soShow produced by Dan Gummel, Zack McKinley, and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/31/20211 hour, 7 minutes, 52 seconds
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Does the Bible Borrow from Other Creation Stories? – Ancient Cosmology E2

What is existence? What existed before humans did? Ancient people groups asked the same questions we do today, with totally different answers. In this episode, Tim and Jon survey the cosmologies of Israel’s neighbors, ancient Egypt, Canaan, and Babylon––people groups the biblical authors shared more in common with than modern readers––to shed light on the Bible’s creation account.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0-6:30)Part two (6:30-19:00)Part three (19:00-39:30)Part four (39:30-50:45)Part five (50:45-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Hermann Gunkel, Creation and Chaos in the Primeval Era and the EschatonBernard Batto, In the Beginning: Essays on Creation Motifs in the Ancient Near East and the BibleShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSEvil Needle by Sound EscapesLightness by AnonymousShow produced by Dan Gummel, Zack McKinley, and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/24/20211 hour, 20 minutes, 21 seconds
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Genesis 1 and the Origins of the Universe – Ancient Cosmology E1

What does the Bible really say about the origins of the universe? The biblical authors had a completely different framework for this question than we do. When we expect the Bible to settle our debates, we close ourselves off from understanding the text as they intended it. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they kick off a new series on Genesis 1-3, beginning with a look at ancient cosmologies.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-8:15)Part two (8:15-12:30)Part three (12:30-20:00)Part four (20:00-27:00)Part five (27:00-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.John H. Walton, Ancient Near Eastern Thought and the Old TestamentWilliam Brown, The Seven Pillars of Creation: The Bible, Science, and the Ecology of WonderShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSLofi Birds“Imagination” by Montell Fish“All Night” by Unwritten StoriesShow produced by Dan Gummel, Zack McKinley, and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/17/202134 minutes, 38 seconds
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In the Beginning with Lady Wisdom – Proverbs 8

Who was at the beginning of the cosmos with God? God’s Spirit? God’s word? Or Lady Wisdom? Rich with creation narrative ties, the book of Proverbs contains important insights for how we understand God’s relationship to his creation and who Jesus is. Join Tim, Jon, and Carissa as they explore Proverbs 8.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-8:30)Part two (8:30-21:00)Part three (21:00-36:00)Part four (36:00-52:00)Part five (52:00-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Michael V. Fox, Proverbs 1-9Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Euk's First Race” by David Gummel“Scream Pilots” by Moby“Drug Police” by Moby“Shot in the Back of the Head” by MobyShow produced by Dan Gummel, Zack McKinley, and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. 
5/10/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 25 seconds
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Why Melchizedek Matters—Feat. Dr. Josh Mathews

Of all the people in the Hebrew Bible, why is Melchizedek so crucial for understanding Jesus? In this episode, join Tim, Jon, and special guest Dr. Josh Mathews as they take a deep dive into the Old Testament, the book of Hebrews, and the life of the mysterious priest-king Melchizedek in relationship to the ultimate priest-king, Jesus.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-15:30)Part two (15:30-24:00)Part three (24:00-31:30)Part four (31:30-41:00)Part five (41:00-51:00)Part six (51:00-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Josh Mathews, Melchizedek’s Alternative Priestly Order: A Compositional Analysis of Genesis 14:18-20 and its Echoes Throughout the TanakShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Aso x Aviino x Middle School” by Canary Forest“Acquired in Heaven” by Beautiful Eulogy“Blue Wednesday x Shopan” by Directions“Tell Me Yours” by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Dan Gummel and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/3/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 19 seconds
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Jesus, Melchizedek, and the Priestly Line – Feat. the Rev. Dr. Amy Peeler

Jesus is our priest, our atoning sacrifice––and our brother? In this episode, join Tim, Jon, and special guest the Rev. Amy Peeler, Ph.D., as they discuss the book of Hebrews and how the many characteristics of God found in this epistle set him apart as wholly other and also form our identities as his followers.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-13:15)Part two (13:15-28:20)Part three (28:20-38:30)Part four (38:30-51:30)Part five (51:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Amy L. B. Peeler, You Are My Son: The Family of God in the Epistle to the HebrewsAmy L. B. Peeler and Patrick Gray, Hebrews: An Introduction and Study GuideMadison N. Pierce, Divine Discourse in the Epistle to the Hebrews: The Recontextualization of Spoken Quotations of ScriptureShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Into the Past” by CYGN“Cycles” by SwuM“Surrender” by PilgrimShow produced by Dan Gummel and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/26/20211 hour, 1 minute, 22 seconds
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Mark of the Priest or Mark of the Beast? – Priest E8 Q+R

Thanks to our audience for all your incredible questions! In this week’s episode, we tackle questions like: How could God break his covenant with the tribe of Levi? What’s the connection between the forehead markings of priests and followers of the beast? And why did offering his own sacrifice cost Saul his kingship? Listen in to hear the team answer your questions.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps What’s the Connection Between Israel’s Priests and Modern Church Leaders? (1:04)Are We Meant to “Shine” as God’s Image? (7:40)Mark of the Priest or Mark of the Beast? (14:10)Why Was David Allowed to Break the Sabbath? (20:20)Did God Break His Promise to the Tribe of Levi? (28:30)What Was Wrong With Saul’s Sacrifice? (36:22)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Dan Gummel and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/19/202146 minutes, 4 seconds
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We Are the Royal Priesthood – Priest E7

After Jesus’ disciples receive the Holy Spirit, they become God’s temple and the physical embodiment of Jesus on earth. This has huge implications for our understanding of what it means to be the church today and live in unity. Dive into this discussion with Tim and Jon as they unpack what it means for followers of Jesus to be the royal priesthood, now and in eternity.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-6:56)Part two (6:56-16:13)Part three (16:13-31:55)Part four (31:55-42:35)Part five (42:35-end)Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Loving Someone You Lost” by The Field Tapes“Friends Circle” by Sitting Duck“Two For Joy” by Foxwood“Fills the Skies” by PilgrimShow produced by Dan Gummel and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/12/202150 minutes, 58 seconds
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The Priest of Heaven and Earth – Priest E6

What does it mean for Jesus to be humanity’s cosmic priest? It means he intercedes on behalf of humanity––and so much more! Through Jesus, God has forever included humanity into his own self. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they discuss Jesus’ ascension and the eternal union of heaven and earth.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-18:30)Part two (18:30-23:00)Part three (23:00-31:00)Part four (31:00-43:00)Part five (43:00-end)Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Window” by Phury“Everything Fades to Blue EP” by Sleepy FishShow produced by Dan Gummel and Cooper Peltz. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
4/5/20211 hour, 1 minute, 30 seconds
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The High Priest Showdown – Priest E5

Why were the Levitical priests always getting mad at Jesus? Jesus identified himself as another of God’s anointed priests––except he came in his own authority. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss how Jesus fulfills Moses’ prophet-priest role and the priest-king role we saw in David.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-12:00)Part two (12:00-21:30)Part three (21:30-34:00)Part four (34:00-45:30)Part five (45:30-end)Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSChillhop Essentials Spring 2021 EPShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/29/202156 minutes, 42 seconds
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David, the Leaping Priest-King – Priest E4

What will God do with the continually failing Levitical priesthood? God announces that he will elect his own faithful priest from a household that can be counted on. In this episode, join Tim and Jon as they follow the royal priesthood all the way to David, anointed priest-king of Jerusalem, fulfillment of Melchizedek’s role, and foreshadowing of the coming priest-king Jesus.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–14:30)Part two (14:30–28:00)Part three (28:00–36:30)Part four (36:30–47:00)Part five (47:00–end)Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Canary Forest” by Middle School, Aso, and AviinoShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/22/20211 hour, 1 minute, 5 seconds
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Doomed to Fail? – Priest E3

The origins of Israel’s royal priesthood are anything but glamorous. From Moses rejecting God five times to Aaron creating an idol while God is instructing Moses about priests, the Levitical priesthood seems doomed from the start. In this episode, discover just how important the failed priesthood is to the story of the Bible.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-15:00)Part two (15:00-24:00)Part three (24:00-35:00)Part four (35:00-end)Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Aarigod” by Forest LoreShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/15/202149 minutes, 7 seconds
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Who Was Melchizedek? – Priest E2

What do Abraham, Melchizedek, and David all have in common? They’re part of the unfolding theme of the royal priesthood in the Bible. In this week’s episode, join Tim and Jon as they explore how this theme is part of humanity’s quest to get back to the blessings of Eden.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–11:30)Part two (11:30–18:45)Part three (18:45–25:00)Part four (25:00–31:30)Part five (31:30–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“We Must Believe in Spring” by Psalm Trees and Guillaume MuschalleChillhop Essentials Fall 2020Show produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/8/202144 minutes, 5 seconds
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Priests of Eden – Priest E1

In the story of the Bible, all the main players are prophets, priests, or kings. While it might seem foreign to us today, those three roles are intimately connected to what it means to be people created in the image of God. Join Tim and Jon for the first episode of a new series on the royal priesthood!View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–19:00)Part two (19:00–29:00)Part three (29:00–34:30)Part four (34:30–50:00)Part five (50:00–end)Mentioned ResourcesS. Dean McBride, “Divine Protocol: Genesis 1:1-2:3 as Prologue to the Pentateuch.”John H. Walton, The Lost World of Adam and Eve.Tim Mackie, "Jesus is Your Priest," Exploring My Strange Bible podcast.Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Directions” by Blue Wednesday and Shopan“Prophet Priest King” by Smalltown PoetsDiscover LP by CYGNShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/1/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 22 seconds
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Babbling Babies Rule the World

A coming king and a bunch of crying babies? Psalm 8 can seem kind of confusing. But when we look closer and understand its context, we can see that it’s actually a beautiful meditation on the image of God. Join Tim, Jon, and Carissa as they discuss this important poem.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-10:45)Part two (10:45-26:45)Part three (26:45-46:30)Part four (46:30-54:30)Part five (54:30-end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Psalm 8” by Poor Bishop HooperShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/22/20211 hour, 5 minutes, 33 seconds
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Does the Church Supercede Israel? – Feat. Andrew Rillera

How can the book of Ephesians contribute to conversations surrounding modern race and justice issues? Tim and Jon interview New Testament scholar Andrew Rillera and discuss Ephesians 2 and the unified, diverse family of God.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one: (0:00–11:00)Part two: (11:00–19:45)Part three: (19:45–30:00)Part four: (30:00–43:30)Part five: (43:30–55:00)Part six: (55:00–61:15)Part seven: (61:15–64:30)Part eight: (64:30–end)Mentioned ResourcesPreston Sprinkle, Nonviolence: The Revolutionary Way of JesusAndrew Rillera, "Tertium Genus or Dyadic Unity? Investigating Sociopolitical Salvation in Ephesians"R. Kendall Soulen, The God of Israel and Christian TheologyWillie James Jennings, The Christian Imagination: Theology and the Origins of RaceTommy Givens, We the People: Israel and the Catholicity of JesusShow Music “Defender Instrumental” by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/15/20211 hour, 11 minutes, 57 seconds
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Reading While Black – Feat. Dr. Esau McCaulley

From biblical deconstruction to the responsibility of Jesus followers in government and social justice, we’re looking at what the Bible has to say about some of society’s biggest questions today. Join Tim and Jon as they interview New Testament scholar Esau McCaulley, author of Reading While Black: African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in Hope.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-13:00)Part two (13:00-26:30)Part three (26:30-33:30)Part four (33:30-42:30)Part five (42:30-end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Pablo” by jlsmrl“Skydive” by loxbeats“Wanderlust” by Crastel“Mind Your Time” by Me.SoShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/8/202151 minutes, 31 seconds
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Why Do Cain's Descendants Show Up After the Flood? – Family of God E10 Q+R

Thank you to our audience for your incredible questions. In this week’s episode, we tackle questions like, did Adam represent a male human? Where did Cain’s wife come from? And what is the relationship of the Church to Israel?  Listen in to hear the team answer your questions.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps How Could There Be Descendants of Cain After the Flood? (0:50)Where Did Cain’s Wife Come From? (13:25)Was Adam Male? (19:35)Was the Promised Land Conquest a Case of Sibling Rivalry? (36:28)Does the Church Replace Israel? (52:35)Referenced ResourcesS. Joshua Swamidass, The Genealogical Adam and Eve: The Surprising Science of Universal AncestryC. John Collins, Reading Genesis Well: Navigating History, Poetry, Science, and Truth in Genesis 1-11Interested in more? Check out Tim’s library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.  Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/1/20211 hour, 1 minute, 19 seconds
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One Family Once More – Family of God E9

God’s plan has always been to bring all of humanity into one diverse and connected family. Jesus carried forward this mission in his teachings, calling God’s people to look past societal divisions and be unified in him. Join Tim and Jon in this week’s podcast episode as they look at the theme of unity in the New Testament.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–9:20)Part two (9:20–23:30)Part three (23:30–34:00)Part four (34:00–39:00)Part five (39:00–59:00)Part six (59:00–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Loving Someone You Lost” by The Field Tapes“Today Feels Like Everyday” by Mama AiutoShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/25/20211 hour, 5 minutes, 9 seconds
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The Powerful and Not Powerful – Family of God E8

In the book of Romans, Paul talks about humanity being justified by faith, but what does this have to do with the family of God? In this episode, Tim and Jon look at Paul’s letter to the Romans and unpack what it looks like to unify a diverse group of people into one family.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–26:00)Part two (26:00–29:00)Part three (29:00–37:30)Part four (37:30–53:20)Part five (53:20–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Loving Someone You Lost” by The Field Tapes“Anecdotes” by MakzoShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/18/20211 hour, 5 minutes, 52 seconds
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Who's In? – Family of God E7

God wants people from all nations to be a part of his family, but Jesus’ mission was focused on Israel. So how did the Gospel message move out from Israel to the rest of the world? Join Tim and Jon as they unpack the arrival of the Spirit and Jesus’ commissioning of his disciples.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–15:30)Part two (15:30–28:30)Part three (28:30–35:50)Part four (35:50–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by TentsMusic by Chilldrone“Anecdotes” by Makzo“Cartilage” by MobyShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/11/202151 minutes, 53 seconds
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Jesus and the Gentiles – Family of God E6

Who did Jesus come for? Throughout the Gospel accounts, Jesus is laser-focused on Israel. Yet his ministry and even his family tree include many non-Israelite people. In this week’s episode, join Tim and Jon for a look at the family of God in the life of Jesus.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–11:00)Part two (11:00–24:30)Part three (24:30–32:15)Part four (32:15–40:15)Part five (40:15–48:00)Part six (48:00–end)Mentioned ResourcesRichard Bauckham, Gospel Women: Studies in the Named Women in the Gospels, 44Craig S. Keener, The Gospel of Matthew: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary, 158–159N. T. Wright, Jesus and the Victory of God, 278Show Music “Shot in the Back of the Head” by Moby“Artificial Music” by A Breath of Fresh Air“Scream Pilots” by Moby“Too North” by Lost Love“Feather” by Waywell“Defender Instrumental” by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.
1/4/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 5 seconds
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BibleProject in 2020: Recap and What's Ahead

In this special year-end episode, Tim and Jon reflect on 2020, share stories from our listeners, and look ahead to exciting projects coming out in 2021. Thanks for being a part of this with us!Series mentioned in this episode:Apocalyptic LiteratureTree of LifeExile 7th Day Rest - SabbathGenerosityTimestamps Part 1 (0:00–20:00)Part 2 (20:00–end)Show Music “Clap Cotton” by Vinho Verde“Defender (Instrumental)” by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/28/202032 minutes, 50 seconds
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Sibling Rivalry and Biblical Election – Family of God E5

Why do God’s chosen people have just as many moral failings as anyone else in the Bible? In this week’s episode, Tim and Jon take a look at ancient sibling rivalries, divine election, and God’s determination to form a covenant people that will one day embrace and include all nations. View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–9:20)Part two (9:20–19:40)Part three (19:40–40:00)Part four (40:00–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/21/202056 minutes, 55 seconds
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Abraham, the Immigrant, and Circumcision – Family of God E4

What does divine election have to do with God’s blessing for all nations? In this week’s episode, we’re picking up the story of the family of God with Genesis 12-17, God’s calling of Abraham. Join Tim and Jon to see how God responds to Abraham and Sarah’s bad choices and turns them into something good for all people.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–17:50)Part two (17:50–30:00)Part three (30:00–40:00)Part four (40:00–56:30)Part five (56:30–end)Show Music “Serendipity feat. The Field Tapes” by Philanthrope“Foggy Road” by Toonorth“Imagination” by Montell Fish“Everything Fades to Blue” by Sleepy Fish“Defender Instrumental” by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/14/20201 hour, 6 minutes, 54 seconds
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What’s So Bad about Babel? – Family of God E3

What was so bad about the Tower of Babel? In this episode, Tim and Jon examine the cycle of division within the human race in Genesis 1-11, the violence that occurs when humans unite apart from God, and God’s plan to use one family to redeem all families in the end.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part 1 (0:00–16:00)Part 2 (16:00–29:30)Part 3 (29:30–35:00)Part 4 (35:00–46:00)Part 5 (46:00–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“The Size of Grace” by Beautiful Eulogy“Acquired in Heaven” by Beautiful Eulogy“Dreams” by xander.Show produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/7/20201 hour, 5 minutes, 4 seconds
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Our Collective Identity – Family of God E2

What is God’s picture of an ideal humanity? In this podcast episode, Tim and Jon look at Genesis 1-2 and talk about how God makes one humanity, divides them, and purposes for them to be one again. And this oneness that God brings doesn’t erase personal and cultural differences; rather, it completes them. View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–7:30)Part two (7:30–37:30)Part three (37:30–49:15)Part four (49:15–end)Show Music “Movement” by Felty“Day and Night” by Aiguille“Cocktail Hour” by Strehlow“Defender Instrumental” by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.
11/30/202056 minutes, 13 seconds
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God’s Global Family – Family of God E1

Jesus unites his followers across cultural and ethnic lines as members of his global family. But that doesn’t mean cultural differences disappear. In fact, Jesus resurrects and glorifies what is unique and beautiful about every culture. In this episode, listen in as Tim and Jon discuss what it means to be part of the family of God.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–22:30)Part two (22:30–32:00)Part three (32:00–43:15)Part four (43:15–end)Additional Resources Philip Jenkins, The New Faces of ChristianityPhilip Jenkins, The Lost History of ChristianityPhilip Jenkins, The Next ChristendomShow Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents “Beneath Your Waves” by Sleepy Fish“Flushing the Stairs” by LeavvShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/23/20201 hour, 51 seconds
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Does God Punish Innocent People? – Character of God E14 Q+R #2

Sometimes the Bible seems to contradict itself––God is slow to anger, except for the times he appears to get mad quickly. The biblical authors don’t give us a systematic explanation, but they invite us to wrestle through our deepest questions and encounter a clearer, more nuanced picture of God. Learn more as Tim, Jon, and Carissa respond to your questions!View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Is God’s wrath passive? (02:00)Does God punish innocent people? (22:40)Why does Psalm 2 say God is quick to anger? (34:40)What did Jesus accomplish by his substitution? (46:22)Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/16/202059 minutes, 13 seconds
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Biblical Trust Isn't Blind – Character of God E13

Are we called to have blind trust in God? Not exactly. People in the Bible trusted God because he had proven himself trustworthy and reliable again and again. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa explore God’s fifth and final attribute in Exodus 34:6, his trustworthiness.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–16:10)Part two (16:10–26:30)Part three (26:30–37:00)Part four (37:00–44:00)Part five (44:00–54:00)Part six (54:00–61:30)Part seven (61:30–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Mirage” by Nymano“Bloc” by KV“Euk's First Race” by David GummelSynth Groove by a supporterShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/9/20201 hour, 8 minutes, 17 seconds
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The Loyal Love of God – Character of God E12

Despite generations of rebellion and sin, God continues to pursue his people with his promise-keeping loyalty and generosity. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa explore the fourth attribute God assigns himself in Exodus 34:6-7, loyal love.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–16:10)Part two (16:10–25:30)Part three (25:30–41:00)Part four (41:00–50:30)Part five (50:30–59:00)Part six (59:00–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Serendipity” by Philanthrope, feat The Field Tapes“Everything Fades to Blue” by Sleepy FishShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/2/20201 hour, 8 minutes, 25 seconds
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Saved from God’s Wrath – Character of God E11

God demonstrates his wrath by handing his people over to the natural consequences of their own destructive decisions, which ultimately leads to death. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa discuss what it means to be saved from God’s wrath by embracing the life of Jesus and a whole new set of natural consequences: lives given over to love and righteousness.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–13:15)Part two (13:15–28:30)Part three (28:30–35:00)Part four (35:00–45:00)Part five (45:00–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Beneath Your Waves” by Sleepy FishShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/26/202056 minutes, 37 seconds
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Two Men Named Jesus – Character of God E10

Jesus saw himself as the one who would drink the cup of God’s wrath, which meant dying in Israel’s place at the hand of Rome. Yet the death of Jesus was about more than just Rome. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa talk about what it meant that Jesus drank the cup.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–15:30)Part two (15:30–20:30)Part three (20:30–45:40)Part four (45:40–54:00)Part five (54:00–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Canary Forest” by Aso x Aviino x Middle School“Friends Circle” by Sitting DuckShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/19/202059 minutes, 41 seconds
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God’s Wrath in the Teaching of Jesus – Character of God E9

It seems like God gets angry all the time in the Hebrew Bible, but then Jesus arrives on the scene with a message of good news and everything changes! Right? It’s not quite that simple. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa survey the consistency between God’s anger in the Old and New Testament and the restorative promise of God’s anger.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–11:45)Part two (11:45–20:45)Part three (20:45–25:45)Part four (25:45–37:17)Part five (37:15–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Snacks” by No Spirit“Tending the Garden feat. Keenebac” by Stan Forebee“Anywhere But Here feat. Philanthrope” by Dotlights“Better Together Forever” by Team AstroShow produced by Dan Gummel. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/12/202043 minutes, 17 seconds
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A Cup of Wrath? – Character of God E8

Noses that burn hot? Turning your face away? Drinking a cup of wrath? These unfamiliar phrases are found in biblical passages about God’s anger, but what do they mean? In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa explore how God’s anger is portrayed in the Hebrew Scriptures toward Israel and the nations.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–15:45)Part two (15:45–37:30)Part three (37:30–43:30)Part four (43:30–end)Show Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“I Know Your Face Better Than Mine” by Taro“Seafoam feat. Sleepy Fish” by Blue Wednesday and Dylan Witherow“Imagination” by Montell FishShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/5/202058 minutes, 14 seconds
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The First Time God Gets Angry – Character of God E7

The flood is one of the most well-known stories in the Bible, yet this story of judgment seems to be missing something important: God’s anger. In the Bible, God’s anger and judgment are not always associated. Listen in as Tim, Jon, and Carissa review a familiar story with insight that helps us understand God’s anger and judgment.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–9:30)Part two (9:30–31:00)Part three (31:00–40:00)Part four (40:00–53:20)Part five (53:20–end)Additional ResourcesL. Daniel Hawk, The Violence of the Biblical GodShow Music “Defender Instrumental” by Tents“Vinho Verde” by Clap Cotton“Imagination” by Montell Fish“So Unnecessary” by Dotlights“Lisbon” by Ason IDShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/28/20201 hour, 2 minutes, 14 seconds
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God's Hot Nose – Character of God E6

In Exodus 34, God describes himself as “slow to anger,” but many people are uncomfortable with the portrait of God as an angry or emotional being. How does the Bible talk about anger, and how does this help us understand God as slow to anger?View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–13:50)Part two (13:50–20:50)Part three (20:50–31:50)Part four (31:50–40:50)Part five (40:50–52:30)Part six (52:30–end)Additional ResourcesTristen Collins, L.P.C. and Jon Collins, Why Emotions MatterAbraham Heschel, The ProphetsShow Music Movement Piano: Copyright Free“According to God” by Beautiful EulogySoft Dreamy Guitar: Copyright Free“After the Crash” by SavFK“A New Year” by Scott BuckleyShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/21/202059 minutes, 29 seconds
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Does God Curse Generations? – Character of God E5 Q+R

Thank you to our audience for your incredible questions. In this week’s episode, we tackle questions like, “Is God the same in the Old and New Testaments?” “Does the Bible support the idea of generational curses?” “Does Moses convince God to change his mind?” Listen in to hear the team answer your questions.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Is God’s character the same in the Old and New Testaments? (00:49)Does the Bible teach about generational curses? (16:05)Consequences versus punishment (27:20)Why did God change his mind? (42:18)Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee.  Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/14/202053 minutes, 58 seconds
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The Uniquely Biblical View of Grace – Character of God E4

Grace is such a familiar word that we often miss the depth of its meaning. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa look at how the Hebrew Bible uses the word grace to communicate one of the core attributes of God.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–13:22)Part two (13:22–26:45)Part three (26:45–38:45)Part four (38:45–53:20)Part five (53:20–62:50)Part six (62:50–end)Additional ResourcesJohn M.G. Barclay, Paul and the GiftJohn M.G. Barclay, Paul and the Power of GraceShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by Tents“Friends Circle” by Sitting DucksShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/7/20201 hour, 11 minutes, 44 seconds
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The Womb of God? - Character of God E3

God describes himself as “compassionate,” but what does that mean? The answer might surprise you. The Hebrew word for compassion is closely related to the word for womb, and in this episode Tim, Jon, and Carissa discuss the Bible’s depiction of God’s compassion.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–8:00)Part two (8:00–15:00)Part three (15:00–21:30)Part four (21:30–31:30)Part five (31:30–46:15)Part six (46:15–end)Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by Tents“My Room Becomes the Sea” by Sleepy FIsh“Ambedo” by Too North“Bloom” by Kyle McEvoy and Stan Forebee“Alive” by OuskaShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/31/202059 minutes, 52 seconds
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A God of Our Own Making – Character of God E2

The golden calf story from the book of Exodus shows us how all of humanity continually tries to worship God on our own terms. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa examine the narrative context of Exodus 34:6-7 and discover how this description of God’s character is tied to the story of the golden calf.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–8:40)Part two (8:40–35:00)Part three (35:00–47:50)Part four (47:50–55:20)Part five (55:20–end)Show Music Defender Instrumental by TentsReflection by SwørnCello From Portland by Beautiful EulogyFeather by WaywellWanderlust by CrastelShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/24/20201 hour, 3 minutes, 21 seconds
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The Most Quoted Verse in the Bible - Character of God E1

Who does God say he is? In this first episode of a new series, Tim, Jon, and Carissa look at the most referenced passages in the Old Testament—a description of God’s character by God himself.View full show notes from this episode →Explore detailed video notes from BibleProject videos on our website: https://tbp.xyz/podvideonotes. Timestamps Part one (0:00–17:15)Part two (17:15–25:20)Part three (25:20–40:50)Part four (40:50–end)Show Music Defender Instrumental by TentsMid Summer by Broke in SummerYou Can Save Me by Beautiful EulogyWish You Were Here by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/17/202055 minutes, 54 seconds
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How Much Context Do We Really Need? - Letters Q+R #2

This week, we finish our How to Read the Bible podcast series with one final Q+R episode where we answer questions like, “How do we know Paul’s letters are authentic?” and “Are morning devotionals still okay?” Tune in to hear your questions answered!View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Is there still a role for devotional reading? (02:12)Did the New Testament authors take the Old Testament out of context? (07:20)How much of the Hebrew Scriptures did Paul expect the Gentiles to know? (15:30)How much context do we need to really understand the letters? (21:37)How was Paul able to write letters while in prison? (30:38)Could the use of scribes explain differences in Paul’s style? (35:38)How do we apply Paul’s words in Romans to our context today? (42:42)Additional Resources G. Beale, The Right Doctrine from the Wrong Texts?: Essays on the Use of the Old Testament in the NewJerome Murphy-O'Connor, O.P., Paul the Letter-Writer: His World, His Options, His SkillsRandolph Richards, Paul and First-Century Letter Writing: Secretaries, Composition and CollectionScot McKnight, Reading Romans BackwardsScot McKnight, The Blue ParakeetShow Music Defender Instrumental by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee.  Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/10/202056 minutes, 7 seconds
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4 Steps to Argument Tracing - Letters E9

The New Testament letters can be difficult to follow, but the right tools can help us unpack their rich meaning. In this episode, Tim and Jon look at 1st century letter templates, Greco-Roman rhetoric, and argument tracing. Learn more in this week’s podcast episode.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–15:50)Part two (15:50–37:30)Part three (37:30–55:45)Part four (55:45–63:40)Part five (63:40–end)Additional Resources John Lee White, Light from Ancient LettersRandolph Richards, Paul and First-Century Letter Writing: Secretaries, Composition and CollectionJerome Murphy-O'Connor, O.P., Paul the Letter-Writer: His World, His Options, His SkillsShow Music Defender Instrumental by TentsDay and Night EP by AiguilleShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/3/20201 hour, 8 minutes, 43 seconds
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Pen, Parchment, and People - Letters E8

Writing a letter in Paul’s day wasn’t as simple as grabbing a pen and paper and placing the finished letter in a mailbox. In this episode, Tim and Jon explore the world of 1st century letter writing, including “cosenders,” letter drafts, the cost of production, and delivery. Listen in on this fascinating conversation.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–19:40)Part two (19:40–29:15)Part three (29:15–44:30)Part four (44:30–57:30)Part five (57:30–end)Additional Resources Randolph Richards, Paul and First-Century Letter Writing: Secretaries, Composition and CollectionJerome Murphy-O'Connor, O.P., Paul the Letter-Writer: His World, His Options, His SkillsShow Music Defender Instrumental by TentsScream Pilots by MobyLittle Spirit by DelaydeShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/27/20201 hour, 5 minutes, 46 seconds
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Which New Testament Commands Should We Obey? Letters Q+R #1

Do we have to follow all the commands in the New Testament? Did Paul know his words were inspired? And why doesn’t the Bible condemn slavery? Tim and Jon respond to these questions and more in this week’s Question and Response episode.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Could it be beneficial to memorize and perform New Testament letters? (00:36)Did Paul craft his letters as meditation literature? (03:17)What was included when Paul said “all Scripture” was God-breathed? (10:11)What about 1 Enoch? (15:54)Did Paul know his letters were inspired? (19:45)Are the letters wisdom or commands? (33:10)Why doesn’t the Bible condemn owning slaves? (39:58)What does it mean to submit to government authorities? (48:20)Additional Resources Scot McKnight, The Blue ParakeetScot McKnight, The Letter to Philemon (The New International Commentary on the New Testament) Esau McCaulley, Reading While Black: African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in HopeShow Music Defender Instrumental by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Audience questions collected by Christopher Maier.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/23/202056 minutes, 42 seconds
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Did Paul Actually Say That? - Letters E6

Did Paul actually say that? In this week’s podcast episode, Tim and Jon talk about how to wisely read the New Testament letters by asking key questions about Paul’s context. This practice, known as mirror reading, can help us read and apply these letters to our lives responsibly.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–14:00)Part two (14:00–25:00)Part three (25:00–39:30)Part four (39:30–59:30)Part five (59:30–end)Additional Resources John M. G. Barclay, Obeying the Truth: Paul's Ethics in GalatiansScot McKnight, Reading Romans Backwards: A Gospel of Peace in the Midst of EmpireNijay Gupta, “Mirror-Reading Moral Issues in Paul’s Letters,” in Journal for the Study of the New Testament, vol. 34 (2012), pp. 361-381.Robert Jewett, Romans: A Commentary, 59.Show Music Defender Instrumental by TentsPlaya by Mauro SommBubble by KVPale Horses by MobyA Case for Shame by MobyShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/20/20201 hour, 10 minutes, 3 seconds
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The Drama We Don’t Know - Letters E5

The New Testament letters were written to address specific situations among specific groups of people. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss how to discern situational context, what to do when information is missing, and how context helps us apply the wisdom of the letters today.View full show notes from this episode →Learn more about Classroom at Classroom.bible.Timestamps Part one (0:00–11:20)Part two (11:20–24:34)Part three (24:34–32:00)Part four (32:00–40:50)Part five (40:50–54:10)Part six (54:10–end)Show Music Defender Instrumental by TentsDreams by XanderCocktail Hour by StrehlowAcquired in Heaven by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/13/202058 minutes, 48 seconds
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Honor-Shame Culture and the Gospel - Letters E4

Paul wrote his letters in the shadow of Rome. His words stood in stark contrast to Roman rule and its honor-shame culture. Join Tim and Jon in exploring the cultural context of the New Testament letters and the questions we should consider when reading these texts. View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–6:15)Part two (6:15–23:30)Part three (23:30–33:30)Part four (33:30–40:10)Part five (40:10–end)Additional Resources Michael Gorman, Apostle of the Crucified LordShow Music Defender Instrumental by TentsCoastal Town by KuplaClocks by Smith the Misterdoing laundry by weird insideFrame by KVShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/6/202052 minutes, 22 seconds
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How to Live Like Jesus is Lord - Letters E3

The New Testament letters all share a core conviction that shapes how the apostles taught followers of Jesus to live in the first century. Listen in as Tim and Jon discuss the focus of the New Testament letters and how they help us live wisely today. View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00–28:45)Part two (28:45–38:00)Part three (38:00–47:30)Part four (47:30–end)Additional Resources Scot McKnight, Reading Romans BackwardsShow Music Defender Instrumental by TentsFar from Home by Toonorthdoing laundry by weird insideFrame by KVShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/29/202057 minutes, 50 seconds
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A Living Sacrifice? - Letters E2

How do the New Testament letters fit with the rest of the biblical story? In this second part of a live recording in Dallas, Texas, Tim and Jon talk about how the apostles saw themselves as fulfilling God’s promise to bring blessing to all nations and how this perspective transforms the way we read the letters. View full show notes from this episode → Timestamps Part one (0:00–39:30)Part two (39:30–end)Additional Resources Bruce Longnecker, The Lost Letters of Pergamum Show Music Defender Instrumental by TentsWhispering Wind by MobyShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/22/202059 minutes, 15 seconds
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Context is Crucial - Letters E1

In this live episode, Tim and Jon interact with an audience in Dallas, Texas for the launch of a new series on how to read the New Testament letters. Letters make up much of the New Testament, and knowing how to view and interpret them is essential for seeing the story of Jesus woven through the New Testament. View full show notes from this episode → Timestamps Part one (0:00–35:45) Part two (35:45–end) Show Music Defender Instrumental by Tents Memory Gospel by Moby Show produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/15/202055 minutes, 14 seconds
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The Blood Cries Out - Apocalyptic Special Episode

In this special mid-week podcast episode, Tim and Jon address recent events in light of The Revelation. Listen in as they discuss the use of “word and testimony,” the meaning of Babylon, and the exposure of slavery in the book of Revelation.View full show notes from this episode →TimestampsPart 1 (0:13:30)Part 2 (13:30-28:30)Part 3 (28:30-39:30)Part 4 (39:30-47:00)Part 5 (47:00-end)Additional ResourcesRichard Bauckham, “The Economic Critique of Rome in Revelation 18,” p. 370-371.BibleProject, Exile podcast seriesBibleProject, Way of the ExileShow MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsNo Spirit: Snacks EPChillhop Essentials Summer 2020Conquor by Beautiful EulogyShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/10/202052 minutes, 29 seconds
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Does the Bible Predict the End of the World? - Apocalyptic Q+R

Are these the end times? Why does the Bible use language of fiery judgment? And what is the mark of the beast? In this episode, Tim and Jon answer your questions about how to read apocalyptic literature.View full show notes from this episode →TimestampsDoes the Bible Predict the End of the World? (1:30)Are There Personal Apocalypses? (16:28)How Can You Tell a True Apocalypse? (24:20)Has Every Follower of Jesus had an Apocalypse? (30:14)Is There a Link Between Apocalyptic and Test Narratives in the Bible? (34:50)How Should We Understand Fiery Judgment in the Bible? (40:10)Bonus: What About the Mark of the Beast? (55:59)Additional ResourcesMichael Gorman, Reading Revelation Responsibly, p. 64.BibleProject, Tree of Life podcast seriesRichard Bauckham, The Theology of the Book of RevelationShow MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/8/20201 hour, 3 minutes, 5 seconds
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Five Strategies for Reading Revelation - Apocalyptic E6

The book of Revelation is full of symbols and images that are confusing when we remove them from the context of the Hebrew Bible. But if we understand the context, community, and nature of apocalyptic literature, the text can reshape the way we see the world. In this final episode of our series How to Read Apocalyptic Literature, Tim and Jon look at the book of Revelation.View full show notes from this episode →Additional ResourcesMichael Gorman, Reading Revelation Responsibly, p. 64.Melodysheep, Timelapse of the Future: A Journey to the End of TimeBibleProject, Overview: Revelation Part One and TwoSteve Moyice, The Old Testament in the Book of RevelationShow MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsSnacks EP by No SpiritFills The Skies by Josh WhiteShow produced by Dan Gummel and Camden McAfee.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
6/1/202053 minutes, 54 seconds
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A Walking, Talking Apocalypse – Apocalyptic E5

The opening pages of the Bible show us God’s good plan to rule with humanity as his image in heaven and on earth. Later characters in the story experience apocalyptic moments where they glimpse this ideal world and gain perspective to bring comfort and challenge to the world. Listen in as Tim and Jon discuss how this all points us to Jesus.View full show notes from this episode → Additional ResourcesHeaven and Earth Podcast SeriesMore on the divine counsel in podcast episode Spiritual Warfare: God E3Image of God Podcast SeriesOur video Image of GodCrispin Fletcher-Louis, “God’s Image, His Cosmic Temple, and the High Priest,” Heaven on Earth: The Temple in Biblical Theology, pp. 83-84.S. Dean McBride Jr, Divine Protocol: Genesis 1:1-2:3 as Prologue to the Pentateuch, pp. 16-17.Richard Bauckham, The Theology of the Book of Revelation, pp. 6-7. Show MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsMind Garden by 
leavvWhite Oak by dryhopeCinnamon Sugar by Philanthrope x G Mills
5/25/20201 hour, 4 minutes, 1 second
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The Jewish Apocalyptic Imagination - Apocalyptic E4

Our dreams are often filled with strange images. What happens when a prophet, steeped in the Scriptures, receives a dream from God? The resulting imagery is packed with hyperlinks to the Hebrew Bible. In this episode, Tim and Jon begin discussing Revelation and tracing these visions through the rest of the Bible.View full show notes from this episode →Additional ResourcesRichard Bauckham, The Theology of the Book of RevelationOur video TempleShow MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsMemories of Spring by Tokyo Music WalkerPerilune by AeroheadJimi? Is that you? by David GummelShow produced by Dan Gummel.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/18/202038 minutes, 19 seconds
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Is the Gospel an Apocalypse? Apocalyptic E3

Are the Gospel accounts apocalyptic? In this episode, Tim and Jon break down the use of the word apocalypse in the ancient Jewish world and highlight examples from the Gospel accounts and the life of Paul.View full show notes from this episode →Show MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsWhite Oak by dryhopeMy Room Becomes the Sea by Sleepy FishShow produced by Dan Gummel.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
5/11/202039 minutes, 49 seconds
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Dreams and Visions – Apocalyptic E2

The Bible is filled with key moments that hinge on dreams. How did people in the Bible understand these moments, and what can we learn from them? In this episode, Tim and Jon have a fascinating conversation about the nature of apocalyptic dreams and visions in the Bible.View full show notes from this episode →Show MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsAfter Dark by Sugi.waMy Room Becomes the Sea by Sleepy FishCold Weather Kids by AerocityShow produced by Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast
5/4/202053 minutes, 19 seconds
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Apocalypse Please – Apocalyptic E1

Is this the apocalypse? Tim and Jon begin a new series, How to Read Apocalyptic Literature. They’ll be talking about the COVID-19 pandemic and how the Bible opens our eyes and changes us in our present moment. Want to share how you're experiencing this present crisis as an apocalypse? Send us an email at [email protected] full show notes from this episode →Additional ResourcesSon of Man Podcast SeriesShow MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsSnacks by No SpiritYesterday on Repeat by VexentoShow produced by Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast
4/27/202055 minutes, 22 seconds
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Parables in Context – Parables Q+R

Why didn’t Paul use more parables? Is the parable of the four soils about salvation, or something else? In this episode, Tim and Jon answer these and other excellent audience questions on the parables of Jesus.View full show notes from this episode →Additional ResourcesRichard Bauckham, “The Rich Man and Lazarus: The Parable and the Parallels,” New Testament Studies 37, no. 2 (1991), 225–246.Tim Mackie, “How We Listen [Parables of the Kingdom],” Blackhawk Church, July 24, 2011.Show MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsShow produced by Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast
4/23/202051 minutes, 45 seconds
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Finding Meaning in the Parables – Parables E6

How do you determine the meaning of a parable? And how should you apply it to your life? In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss how to identify the meaning and significance of the parables of Jesus.View full show notes from this episode →Additional ResourcesCraig Blomberg, Interpreting the ParablesShow MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsOcean Patio bu Philanthrope x DayleInstrumental by KaleidoscopeJumping off the Porch by Broke in SummerMy Room Becomes The Sea by Sleepy Fishdoing laundry by weird insideShow produced by Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast
4/20/20201 hour, 22 minutes, 54 seconds
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Decoding the Parables – Parables E5

In this episode, Tim and Jon talk about the first of three questions to help us become wise readers of the parables and gain insight from them. What symbols did Jesus weave in the parables—and which did he not? Join Tim and Jon for this fascinating discussion.View full show notes and images from this episode →Additional ResourcesKlyne Snodgrass, Stories with Intent: A Comprehensive Guide to the Parables of JesusCraig Blomberg, Interpreting the ParablesAmy Jill-Levine, Short Stories by JesusShow MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsBeneath Your Waves by Sleepy FishShow produced by Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast
4/13/20201 hour, 11 minutes, 11 seconds
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The Crisis of Decision – Parables E4

The parables of Jesus force a choice for his listeners. Will they embrace the upside-down value system of the Kingdom of God, or will they refuse to participate in the party? In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss two additional themes of the parables.View full show notes and images from this episode →Show MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsLate Night Driving by Broke In SummerMorning Station by Tokyo Music WalkerCollages by Sleepy FishShow produced by Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast
4/6/202052 minutes, 36 seconds
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Parables as Subversive Critique – Parables E3

Jesus often used parables as a means of indirect communication to critique and dismantle his listener’s views of the world in order to show them the true nature of God’s Kingdom. In this episode, Tim and Jon talk about the role of the parables in persuading listeners through subversive critique.View full show notes from this episode →Additional ResourcesKlyne Snodgrass, Stories with Intent, 8-9.Robert Farrar Capon, Kingdom, Grace, Judgment in the Parables of Jesus, 5-7.Our video, How to Read the Bible: Ancient Jewish Meditation LiteratureShow MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsDiscover by C Y G NConiferous by KuplaShow produced by Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast
3/30/20201 hour, 3 minutes, 48 seconds
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Jesus and the Parables of the Prophets – Parables E2

Many of Jesus’ parables sound oddly similar to the parables of the prophets. This isn’t coincidence. Jesus saw himself as fulfilling the role of a prophet to Israel’s leaders. In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the parables as part of Jesus’ prophetic role to Israel.View full show notes and images from this episode →Additional ResourcesCraig L. Blomberg, Interpreting the Parables.N. T. Wright, Jesus and the Victory of God, 180-181.Show MusicThird Floor by GreyfloodConversation by Broke in SummerEducated Fool by GreyfloodBloom by Kyle McEvoy and Stan ForebeeProduced by Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast
3/23/20201 hour, 14 minutes, 52 seconds
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Taking God’s Name in Vain? - feat. Dr. Carmen Imes

In this interview with Dr. Carmen Imes, Tim and Jon discuss the command, “Do not take the name of the Lord your God in vain.” What does this mean? Carmen discusses how many people miss the point of this commandment all about who we are and what we’re called to do.View full show notes and images from this episode →This month, we launched Classroom—free online graduate-level courses from BibleProject. Learn more and sign up for the beta at bibleproject.com/learnResources Carmen Imes, Bearing God’s Name: Why Sinai Still MattersShow Music: Defender Instrumental by TentsHello from Portland by Beautiful EulogyLevity by Johnny GrimesTomorrow’s A New Day by SaintSetShow Produced by Dan Gummel. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/19/202056 minutes, 29 seconds
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The Purpose of Parables – Parables E1

View full show notes and images from this episode → Resources N. T. Wright, Simply Jesus: A New Vision of Who He Was, What He Did, and Why He Matters, 87-88.Our video on How to Read the Parables of JesusShow Music: Defender Instrumental by TentsWhen I Was A Boy by Tokyo Music WalkerOyasumi by Smith the MisterVelocities by Sleepy FishShow Produced by Dan Gummel. Learn more about BibleProject at bibleproject.com. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/16/20201 hour, 11 minutes, 45 seconds
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Is the Tree of Life Practical? Tree Q+R 2

View full show notes and images from this episode → Watch our video on the Tree of Life.Resources:Dr. Crispin Fletcher-Louis Jewish Apocalyptic and ApocalypticismShow Music: Defender Instrumental: TentsShow Produced by Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/9/20201 hour, 4 minutes, 39 seconds
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Jesus on the Cursed Tree - Tree of Life E9

View full show notes and images from this episode → Watch our video on the Tree of Life.Take our first class for free at classroom.bibleResourcesR. Riesner, “Archeology and Geography,” ed. Joel B. Green, Jeannine K. Brown, and Nicholas Perrin, Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels, Second Edition, 55.MusicDefender Instrumental: TentsScream Pilots: MobyAmbedo: Too NorthReminiscing: No SpiritChillhop daydreams 2Show produced by Dan Gummel.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
3/2/20201 hour, 20 minutes, 5 seconds
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Back to the Tree of Life – Tree of Life E8

View full show notes from this episode → Watch our Tree of Life video.ResourcesR. T. France, The Gospel of MatthewLeon Morris, The Gospel according to MatthewMusicDefender Instrumental by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/24/202052 minutes, 20 seconds
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David, Isaiah, and New Eden – Tree of Life E7

King David sets up a new Eden in Jerusalem, but the people continue to set up false Edens in high places. How will God respond, and when will he raise up the seed who will usher in a new Eden? The book of Isaiah brings these themes together and points us to God’s answer.View full show notes and images from this episode →ResourcesHoliness (theme video)MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsEuk's First Race by David GummelAll Night by Unwritten StoriesFor When It's Warmer by Sleepy FishShow produced by Dan Gummel.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/17/202053 minutes, 24 seconds
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Moses, Israel, & The S’neh Tree – Tree of Life E6

The story of Moses repeats key themes from the stories of the garden, Noah, and Abraham. Moses and Israel both face tests before trees on high places, and Moses takes the act of sacrifice one step further. Listen in as Tim and Jon discuss Moses and the s’neh tree.View full show notes and images from this episode →Show MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsSundown by Aarbor x AarigodDaylight by Jay SomedayConiferous by KuplaShow produced by Dan Gummel and Tim Mackie.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/10/20201 hour, 7 minutes, 39 seconds
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Are Humans Naturally Immortal? Tree of Life Q+R #1 – Tree of Life E5

Why are moments of testing on high places often accompanied by sacrifice in the Bible? Why does the Eden story seem ambiguous about the number of trees in the garden? Were humans mortal when they were placed in the garden? Tim and Jon respond to these questions and more in this question and response episode.View full show notes and images from this episode →MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
2/3/202037 minutes
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Dismantling the Tree - Tree of Life E4

Noah and Abraham both face important tests before a tree on a high place. Their obedience and sacrifice opens the door for mercy and blessing, and their stories point us to a future hope of one who will overcome the tree of knowing good and bad and restore humanity. Listen in as Tim and Jon discuss Noah, Abraham, and their moments of decision at trees on high places.View full show notes and images from this episode →ResourcesWhy Did God Ask Abraham to Sacrifice Isaac? Blog by Andy PattonMusicDefender Instrumental by TentsFIlls the Skies by PilgrimFound Memories by XanderWanderlust by CrastelShow produced by Dan Gummel.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/27/20201 hour, 8 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Tale of Two Trees - Tree of Life E3

View full show notes from this episode →ResourcesHow to Read the Bible: The Books of SolomonMusicDefender Instrumental by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/20/202050 minutes, 8 seconds
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Trees of the Ancients – Tree of Life E2

View full show notes and images from this episode →ResourcesBruce Waltke, An Old Testament Theology: An Exegetical, Canonical, and Thematic Approach, 257William Osborne, Trees and Kings: A Comparative Analysis of Tree Imagery in Israel’s Prophetic Tradition and the Ancient Near East. Terje Stordalen, Echoes of Eden Genesis 2-3 and Symbolism of the Eden Garden in Biblical Hebrew Literature.Charles Taylor, A Secular Age.MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/13/202058 minutes, 7 seconds
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Humans are... Trees? - Tree of Life E1

View full show notes →ResourcesMatthew Sleeth, Reforesting FaithGeorge Lakoff and Mark Johnson, Metaphors We Live ByMusicGreyflood: A Moment, A Memory, A Beginning.John Williams: The ForceKyle McElvoy & Stan Forebee: BloomKV: BlocDefender Instrumental by TentsShow produced by Dan Gummel.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
1/6/20201 hour, 7 minutes, 2 seconds
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Happy New Year and What's Ahead for The Bible Project

Check out all we're up to in 2020 and beyond at www.thebibleproject.com. View our classroom beta at www.classroom.bible.  And learn how you can join a growing family of supporters at www.thebibleproject.com/vision Happy New Year! Theme Music:Defender Instrumental by Tents Show Produced By: Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/31/201917 minutes, 55 seconds
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Hebrews: The Quest for Final Rest - 7th Day Rest E14

QUOTE"The design of the wilderness narratives in the Torah are trying to tell us that the arrival in the promised land is an image of the future seventh day rest that is beyond.” KEY TAKEAWAYSThe book of Hebrews is written to Messianic Jews who are extremely familiar with the Old Testament.Hebrews 3 is built around a long quote from Psalm 95, which is a psalm reflecting on Israel’s failure to enter into the promised land of rest.Israel rebelled seven times against the Lord in the wilderness.The ultimate seventh day rest has been inaugurated by Jesus, but has not seen its complete fulfillment yet. SHOW NOTES:Welcome to our final episode in our series on the theme of Sabbath and seventh day rest!In part 1 (0-21:10), Tim and Jon recap their previous conversations. Tim shares a resource called “From Sabbath to Lord’s Day” by D.A. Carson, a collection of essays examining the evolution and relationship of historical Jewish Sabbath celebrations and the celebration of Sunday as “the Lord’s Day.”In part 2 (21:10-33:00), the guys dive into Hebrews 3.Hebrews 3:1-19"Therefore, holy brothers and sisters, who share in the heavenly calling, fix your thoughts on Jesus, whom we acknowledge as our apostle and high priest. He was faithful to the one who appointed him, just as Moses was faithful in all God’s house. Jesus has been found worthy of greater honor than Moses, just as the builder of a house has greater honor than the house itself. For every house is built by someone, but God is the builder of everything. “Moses was faithful as a servant in all God’s house,” bearing witness to what would be spoken by God in the future. But Christ is faithful as the Son over God’s house. And we are his house, if indeed we hold firmly to our confidence and the hope in which we glory.“So, as the Holy Spirit says:“‘Today, if you hear his voice,do not harden your heartsas you did in the rebellion,during the time of testing in the wilderness,where your ancestors tested and tried me,though for forty years they saw what I did.That is why I was angry with that generation;I said, “Their hearts are always going astray,and they have not known my ways.”So I declared on oath in my anger,“They shall never enter my rest.”’“See to it, brothers and sisters, that none of you has a sinful, unbelieving heart that turns away from the living God. But encourage one another daily, as long as it is called ‘today,’ so that none of you may be hardened by sin’s deceitfulness. We have come to share in Christ, if indeed we hold our original conviction firmly to the very end. As has just been said:“‘Today, if you hear his voice,do not harden your heartsas you did in the rebellion.’“Who were they who heard and rebelled? Were they not all those Moses led out of Egypt? And with whom was he angry for forty years? Was it not with those who sinned, whose bodies perished in the wilderness? And to whom did God swear that they would never enter his rest if not to those who disobeyed? So we see that they were not able to enter, because of their unbelief.”Tim notes that in verse 7, the writer begins to quote from Psalm 95. Earlier in Psalm 95, Yahweh is referred to as “the rock of rescue.” This name originally comes from a story in Exodus 17.Exodus 17:5-7“The Lord answered Moses, ‘Go out in front of the people. Take with you some of the elders of Israel and take in your hand the staff with which you struck the Nile, and go. I will stand there before you by the rock at Horeb. Strike the rock, and water will come out of it for the people to drink.’ So Moses did this in the sight of the elders of Israel. And he called the place Massah and Meribah because the Israelites quarreled and because they tested the Lord saying, ‘Is the Lord among us or not?’”In Israel’s wilderness journey, there are seven stories of rebellion. Israel chose to doubt God and rebel against Moses seven times. These seven stories exclude them from being able to enter the promised land. Instead, that generation dies in the wilderness.In part 3 (33:00-40:30), Tim notes that the author of Hebrews then reads the wilderness narratives as a story that still applies to all people today. People can still miss out on the promised land of God’s rest if they harden their hearts and do not listen to Jesus.God’s rest is something that Christ inaugurated, but it has yet to be completely fulfilled and will be fulfilled in the future.In part 4 (40:30-end), Tim mentions that Hebrews seems to be written as an oratory speech or a written sermon. Jon says that he feels an urge to have some sort of practice or Sabbath ritual that he can rely on to create a rhythm in his life.Tim mentions that perhaps the most helpful part of a Sabbath rhythm is that it should be a constant reminder that our time does not belong to us, but is a gift from God. Resources:D.A. Carson, From Sabbath to Lord’s Day Music:Defender Instrumental by TentsBloc by KVHalfway Through by Broke in SummerI Gave You A Flower by Le Gang Show Produced By:Dan GummelPowered and Distributed by SimpleCast.
12/30/201957 minutes, 35 seconds
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Lord of the Sabbath - 7th Day Rest E13

QUOTE"We're getting into the scandal that Jesus represented—which wasn’t offering an alternative religion; it was saying that he was bringing the whole storyline of the Scriptures to fulfillment."KEY TAKEAWAYSJesus' claim to be "Lord of the Sabbath" was a key part of his understanding of his own identity.Jesus’ resurrection is literally and metaphorically the first dawning of a new week. He was literally raised on the first rays of a new week, and metaphorically, this represented Jesus and all who follow him entering a new age of communion with God.The Sabbath practice and the traditions that surround it has always been a controversial topic. As Gentiles who had no Jewish or Sabbath background fell in love with Jesus, the church began to practice or not practice Sabbath in a variety of ways.SHOW NOTES:In part 1 (0-7:15), Tim and Jon review the conversation so far. Jesus is claiming to bring the eternal seventh-day rest into reality.In part 2 (7:15-21:15), Tim dives into words of Jesus in Matthew. Matthew 11:25-30“At that time Jesus said, ‘I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and intelligent and have revealed them to infants. Yes, Father, for this way was well-pleasing in your sight. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows the Son except the Father; nor does anyone know the Father except the Son, and anyone to whom the Son wills to reveal him.“‘Come to me, all who are weary and heavy-laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.’”Tim quotes from Samuele Bacchiocchi.“The metaphor of the ‘yoke’ was commonly used to express subordination and loyalty to God, especially through obedience to his law. Thus Jeremiah speaks of the leaders of the people who knew ‘the law of their God, but they all alike had broken the yoke, they had burst the bonds’ (5:5; cf. 2:20). In the following chapter, the same prophet says to the people: ‘Find rest for your souls’ by learning anew obedience to God’s law (6:6; cf. Num 25:3). Rabbis often spoke of ‘the yoke of the Torah,’ ‘the yoke of the kingdom of heaven,’ ‘the yoke of the commandments,’ ‘the yoke of God.’ Rabbi Nehunya b. Kanah (ca. 70) is reported to have said: ‘He that takes upon himself the yoke of the Law, from him shall be taken away the yoke of the kingdom and the yoke of worldly care’ (Pirke Aboth 3:5). What this means is that devotion to the law and its interpretation is supposed to free a person from the troubles and cares of this world.”(Samuele Bacchiocchi, “Matthew 11:28-30: Jesus’ Rest and the Sabbath,” p. 300-303.)The quote continues:“Matthew sets forth the ‘yoke’ of Christ, not as commitment to a new Torah, but as dedication to a Person who is the true Interpreter and Fulfiller of the Law and the Prophets. The emphasis on the Person is self-evident in our logion: ‘Come to me . . . take my yoke . . . learn from me ... I will give you rest.’ Moreover, the parallel structure of vss. 28 and 29 indicates that taking the ‘yoke’ of Jesus is equivalent to ‘come to’ and ‘learn from’ him. That is to say, it is to personally accept Jesus as Messiah. Such an acceptance is an ‘easy’ and ‘light’ yoke, not because Jesus weakens the demands of the law (cf. Matt 5:20), but because, as T. W. Manson puts it, ‘Jesus claims to do for men what the Law claimed to do; but in a different way.’ The difference lies in Christ’s claim to offer to his disciples (note the emphatic kago) the rest of Messianic redemption to which the law, and more specifically, the sabbath, had always pointed.”(Samuele Bacchiocchi, “Matthew 11:28-30: Jesus’ Rest and the Sabbath,” p. 300-303.)In part 3 (21:15-30:00), Tim moves into the next story in Matthew.Matthew 12:1-14“At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the Sabbath, and his disciples became hungry and began to pick the heads of grain and eat. But when the Pharisees saw this, they said to him, ‘Look, your disciples do what is not lawful to do on a Sabbath.’ But he said to them, ‘Have you not read what David did when he became hungry, he and his companions, how he entered the house of God, and they ate the consecrated bread, which was not lawful for him to eat nor for those with him, but for the priests alone? Or have you not read in the Law, that on the Sabbath the priests in the temple break the Sabbath and are innocent? But I say to you that one greater than the temple is here. But if you had known what this means, “I desire compassion, and not a sacrifice,” you would not have condemned the innocent. For the Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath.’“Departing from there, he went into their synagogue. And a man was there whose hand was withered. And they questioned Jesus, asking, ‘Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath?’—so that they might accuse him. And he said to them, ‘What man is there among you who has a sheep, and if it falls into a pit on the Sabbath, will he not take hold of it and lift it out? How much more valuable then is a man than a sheep! So then, it is lawful to do good on the Sabbath.’ Then he said to the man, ‘Stretch out your hand!’ He stretched it out, and it was restored to normal, like the other.”Tim says that the controversies caused by Jesus on the Sabbath are not meant to show Jesus as divisive. Rather, when Jesus says he is “Lord of the Sabbath,” he is saying fundamentally the same thing as when he declares, “The Kingdom of God is here.” Both of these phrases are declarations by Jesus that he is beginning the restoration of creation.In part 4 (30:00-38:00), Tim and Jon have a quick discussion about practicing the Sabbath, taking one day out of seven to rest. Did Jesus value this? Yes! Jesus went to synagogue on Sabbath. But Jesus seems to place a greater importance on the concept of the Sabbath. Jesus is effectually saying that what the Sabbath pointed to—a time of constant communion between God and man—is here because he is here.In part 5 (38:00-61:30), Tim talks about instances of Sabbath practice in Paul’s writings.Romans 14:1-12“As for the one who is weak in faith, welcome him, but not to quarrel over opinions. One person believes he may eat anything, while the weak person eats only vegetables. Let not the one who eats despise the one who abstains, and let not the one who abstains pass judgment on the one who eats, for God has welcomed him. Who are you to pass judgment on the servant of another? It is before his own master that he stands or falls. And he will be upheld, for the Lord is able to make him stand. “One person esteems one day as better than another, while another esteems all days alike. Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind. The one who observes the day, observes it in honor of the Lord. The one who eats, eats in honor of the Lord, since he gives thanks to God, while the one who abstains, abstains in honor of the Lord and gives thanks to God. For none of us lives to himself, and none of us dies to himself. For if we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord. So then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord's. For to this end Christ died and lived again, that he might be Lord both of the dead and of the living.“Why do you pass judgment on your brother? Or you, why do you despise your brother? For we will all stand before the judgment seat of God; for it is written,“‘As I live, says the Lord, every knee shall bow to me,and every tongue shall confess to God.’“So then each of us will give an account of himself to God.”Tim also shares from Paul’s writings in Colossians.Colossians 2:16-19“Therefore let no one pass judgment on you in questions of food and drink, or with regard to a festival or a new moon or a Sabbath. These are a shadow of the things to come, but the substance belongs to Christ. Let no one disqualify you, insisting on asceticism and worship of angels, going on in detail about visions, puffed up without reason by his sensuous mind, and not holding fast to the Head, from whom the whole body, nourished and knit together through its joints and ligaments, grows with a growth that is from God.”Tim notes that eating kosher and Sabbath practices were controversial issues in the early Church as they are now. Tim also notes that once the Christian movement became majority non-Jewish, the Christian movement quickly lost respect for its Jewish roots and traditions.Tim then asks, based on Paul, whether modern Christians should have some sort of Sabbath practice? It seems that Paul was flexible. He always went to synagogue and even fulfilled Jewish vows. But he also stood up for Gentiles who had no history or desire to begin practicing Sabbath law. Instead, Paul was excited to build a Christian community where all experienced equality under the lordship of Jesus.In part 6 (61:30-end), the guys quickly talk about the resurrection narrative at the end of the Gospel of Mark.Mark 16:1-3“When the Sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices, so that they might go and anoint him. And very early on the first day of the week, when the sun had risen, they went to the tomb And they were saying to one another, ‘Who will roll away the stone for us from the entrance of the tomb?’”Jesus’ resurrection is literally and metaphorically the first dawning of a new week. He was literally raised on the first rays of a new week, and metaphorically, this represented Jesus and all who follow him entering a new age of communion with God.Thank you to all our supporters!Show Resources:Samuele Bacchiocchi, “Matthew 11:28-30: Jesus’ Rest and the Sabbath,” p. 300-303.Show Music:Yesterday on Repeat by VexentoOhayo by Smith the MisterMy room becomes the sea by Sleepy FishShow Produced By:Dan GummelPowered and Distributed by Simplecast.
12/23/20191 hour, 10 minutes, 7 seconds
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Hidden Sevens & Practical Sabbath: 7th Day Rest Q&R #2 - 7th Day Rest E12

Tim and Jon Responded to these questions: David from Arizona (2:25)My question is, does the frequent occurrence of the number seven and the seventh day in Genesis, Exodus, and the rest of the Bible have more to do with the authors creating design patterns within the narrative to make theological claims? Or is it actually how God himself worked in history? Maybe these are synonymous, but I would love to hear your response.Ashley from Arizona (13:30)I have a question for you regarding Jesus' words during his miracle at the wedding at Cana. When his mother points out that there is no wine, he takes six water pots used for purification and and then puts water in them and then turns those into wine. There seems to be a connection maybe with the six and bringing the best wine out last. But I'm wondering what the connection is between cups of wine in the seventh day. Is that a thing? Thanks so much for your thoughts and all the work you do.Jesse from North New Zealand (20:50)I was wondering about the practical implications of the theological discussion that you've been having. Jews have been practicing Sabbath rest and Sabbath observance for millennia, yet Christians kind of gave up on that a few centuries ago. Should we as Christians go back to Sabbath observance? Is there something more there that I've missed? What are the implications of this Sabbath rest for us as Christians in the world?Jisca from Rwanda (25:34)How do we apply the principle of rest in our time as Christians. What do we do with the inclination to rest on the seventh day? How do we live it out on a daily basis? Thank you.Jon from Malaysia (25:55)I work in the construction industry here, and it's common for people to work six days a week. This has truly made me appreciate the one day of rest that I get every week. However, a lot of my friends who work a normal five-day week say that working six days in today's world can be way too tiring. Could you share thoughts on the practicality of still working six days and resting one day in a modern world? And on the flip side of that, what are the biblical implications if I do not take a break by continually working seven days a week? Thanks for all you do, guys. I love your podcast. Keep it up. Resources:To Hell With The Hustle by Jefferson Bethke The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry by John Mark Comer God Dwells with Us: Temple Symbolism in the Fourth Gospel by Mary Coloe The Subversive Sabbath by A.J. Swaboda At Home with God: A Complete Liturgical Guide for the Christian Home by Gavin Long  Learn more about what we do and join The Bible Project by financially partnering with us:www.thebibleproject.com/vision Show Produced by:Dan Gummel Show MusicDefender Instrumental by Tents Powered and Distributed by Simplecast.
12/19/201943 minutes, 42 seconds
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Jesus and His Jubilee Mission - 7th Day Rest E11

QUOTE"What Jesus is claiming is that the ultimate jubilee that the prophets pointed to has begun. Here it is. I’m doing it. It’s a massive claim."KEY TAKEAWAYSThe Sabbath was a big deal to Jesus. He and the Jewish religious leaders often disagreed over what observing the Sabbath should actually mean.Jesus announced his public ministry at a synagogue on the Sabbath by reading from Isaiah 61, which is a prophecy about a future time of jubilee.Jesus claimed that he was fulfilling all that the ritual and symbolism in the Sabbath pointed to. Jesus claimed to usher in a new age of peace and rest.SHOW NOTESIn part 1 (0-29:15), Tim and Jon review the conversation so far.Tim shares a quote from Samuele Bacchiocchi and his scholarly work, “Sabbatical Typologies of Messianic Redemption.” His essay examines traits of Genesis 1-2 that are carried forward in Jewish texts of the Second Temple period. One of the things that characterized the giving of the Sabbath laws was man’s relationship to and peace with the animals. Consider this excerpt from the Babylonian Talmud.“A. A man should not go out with (1) a sword, (2) bow, (3) shield, (4) club, or (5) spear.“B. And if he went out, he is liable to a sin-offering.“C. R. Eliezer says, ‘They are ornaments for him.’“D. And sages say, ‘They are nothing but ugly,“E. ‘since it is said, “And they shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more” (Isa. 2:4).’” (Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 12a: Jacob Neusner, The Babylonian Talmud: A Translation and Commentary, vol. 2 [Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2011], 269.)Tim also shares Bacchiocchi’s findings on the connection between the themes of food, the Sabbath, and material abundance.Tim shares from 2 Baruch 29:4-6, “the Messiah shall begin to be revealed ... the earth also shall yield its fruit ten thousandfold and on each vine there shall be a thousand branches, and each branch shall produce a thousand clusters, and each cluster produce a thousand grapes and each grape produce a cor of wine.”Abundance through unending food, Tim says, was one of the signs viewed by the prophets as an indication that the Messiah had come.Tim also shares from Bacchiocchi’s findings on the theme of what he calls “Joy and Light.” Bacchiocchi cites Rabbi Levi said in the name of Rabbi Zimra.“‘For the Sabbath day,’ that is, for the day which darkness did not attend. You find that it is written of other days, ‘And there was evening and there was morning, one day.’ But the words, ‘There was evening’ are not written of the Sabbath. And so, the Sabbath light continued thirty-six hours.”(The Midrash on Psalms, translated by William G. Braude [New Haven, 1959], p. 112. Quoted in Samuele Bacchiocchi, “Sabbatical Typologies of Messianic Redemption,” p. 159.)In part 2 (29:15-34:00) Tim and Jon dive into Luke 4.Luke 4:14-21“Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news about him spread through the whole countryside. He was teaching in their synagogues, and everyone praised him. He went to Nazareth, where he had been brought up, and on the Sabbath day he went into the synagogue, as was his custom. He stood up to read, and the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was handed to him. Unrolling it, he found the place where it is written:“The Spirit of the Lord is on me,because he has anointed meto proclaim good news to the poor.He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisonersand recovery of sight for the blind,to set the oppressed free,to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.“Then he rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the attendant and sat down. The eyes of everyone in the synagogue were fastened on him. He began by saying to them, ‘Today this Scripture is fulfilled in your hearing.’”In part 3 (34:00-50:45), Tim examines the word “release” or “freedom” in the Isaiah passage (Grk. aphesis, “release,” or Heb. deror, “Jubilee liberation.” See Isaiah 61:1 and Leviticus 25:10). This is the common word for “forgiveness” in Luke (Luke 1:77 and 3:3), but the word’s meaning is broader in this instance. It’s denoting release from burden or bondage. The word in Isaiah 61 is rooted in the Year of Jubilee (Leviticus 25), and it is about release from the social consequences of society’s collective sin—a freedom from debt, slavery, poverty, and oppression.Tim notes that forgiveness and release are the same word in the New Testament. The guys talk about how Jesus would have viewed “releasing” people from slavery to sin.In part 4 (50:45-58:30), Tim and Jon talk about the controversy Jesus created around the Sabbath. They note that the conflict was not about whether the Sabbath should be observed but instead about what that observance of the Sabbath entailed in practical terms.Take for instance this story from Matthew 12.Matthew 12:9-13 “Departing from there, he went into their synagogue. And a man was there whose hand was withered. And they questioned Jesus, asking, ‘Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath?’—so that they might accuse him. And he said to them, ‘What man is there among you who has a sheep, and if it falls into a pit on the Sabbath, will he not take hold of it and lift it out? How much more valuable then is a man than a sheep! So then, it is lawful to do good on the Sabbath.’ Then he said to the man, ‘Stretch out your hand!’ He stretched it out, and it was restored to normal, like the other.”Tim cites scholar R.T. France on this passage:“Fundamental to the rabbinic discussion was the agreed list (m.Šabb. 7:2) of 39 categories of activity which were to be classified as ‘work’ for this purpose, some of which are very specific (‘writing two letters, erasing in order to write two letters’) others so broad as to need considerable further specification (‘building, pulling down’), while the last (‘taking anything from one “domain” [normally a private courtyard] to another’) is so open-ended as to cover a vast range of daily activities. The 39 categories of work do not explicitly include traveling, but this too was regarded as ‘work,’ a ‘Sabbath-day’s journey’ being limited to 2,000 cubits, a little over half a mile. These two rules together made Sabbath life potentially so inconvenient that the Pharisees developed an elaborate system of ‘boundary-extensions’ (ʿerubin) to allow more freedom of movement without violating the basic rules. The ʿerub system illustrates an essential element of all this scribal development of Sabbath law: its aim was not simply to make life difficult (though it must often have seemed like that), but to work out a way in which people could cope with the practicalities of life within the limits of their very rigorous understanding of ‘work.’ The elaboration of details is intended to leave nothing to chance, so that no one can inadvertently come anywhere near violating the law itself. Some rabbis spoke about this as ‘putting up a fence around the law.’”(R. T. France, The Gospel of Matthew, The New International Commentary on the New Testament [Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publication Co., 2007], 455–456.)In part 5 (58:30-65:30), Tim and Jon discuss how Jesus didn’t really dispute the validity of Sabbath practice. Instead, he insisted that he was fulfilling all the symbolism that the Sabbath pointed to.Tim notes that one way to characterize the life of Jesus is as one big jubilee announcement tour. Jesus went around and released people from sickness and death.In part 6 (65:30-end), Tim and Jon note that Western Protestant tradition tends to separate a social gospel from a proclaimed verbal gospel. This is a false dichotomy that didn’t exist in Jesus’ mind. To proclaim a full gospel of release meant release from cosmic sin and death as well as working to release from physical bondages as well.Thank you to all our supporters!Have a question? Send it to us at [email protected] to join The Bible Project? Go to www.thebibleproject.com/vision Show Resources:Samuele Bacchiocchi, “Sabbatical Typologies of Messianic Redemption.”R. T. France, The Gospel of Matthew, The New International Commentary on the New Testament Show Music:Defender Instrumental by TentsMy Room Becomes The Sea by Sleepy FishThe Cave Resides Deep in the Forest by Artificial Music Show Produced by:Dan Gummel Powered and distributed by SimpleCast.
12/16/20191 hour, 15 minutes, 16 seconds
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Seventy Times Seven - Prophetic Math - 7th Day Rest E10

QUOTE“Welcome to a fascinating industry in biblical scholarship. What we know is that every Jewish group that left a literary record, whether it’s the Qumran community, the Pharisees, the Zealots, and the early Christians—everyone is is talking about Daniel 9. And you can see why. It sets the clock."KEY TAKEAWAYSDaniel 9 and the passage commonly known as "The Seventy Sevens" is one of the most symbolically complex passages in the Bible and also has a wide range of scholarly interpretations surrounding it.Daniel 9 is directly related to Jeremiah 25.The Hebrew prophets like Isaiah in Isaiah 61 began to see the announcement of a jubilee not only as a practice but also as an announcement for a future time when all of humanity would get a restart.SHOW NOTESIn part 1 (0:00–8:20), Jon briefly recaps the conversation so far. Tim shares a verse from Isaiah, “In repentance and rest is your salvation, in quietness and trust is your strength” (Isaiah 30:15). This verse, Tim says, is at the core of the theological claims behind the theme of seventh-day rest in the Bible.In part 2 (8:20–27:30), Tim turns to the book of 2 Chronicles.2 Chronicles 36:20-21“He carried into exile to Babylon the remnant, who escaped from the sword, and they became servants to him and his successors until the kingdom of Persia came to power. The land enjoyed its sabbath rests; all the time of its desolation it rested, until the seventy years were completed in fulfillment of the word of the Lord spoken by Jeremiah.”Tim says that the author of this passage would have had two prophecies from Jeremiah in mind when writing this. Jeremiah 25:11-14“This whole country will become a desolate wasteland, and these nations will serve the king of Babylon seventy years. ‘But when the seventy years are fulfilled, I will punish the king of Babylon and his nation, the land of the Babylonians, for their guilt,’ declares the Lord, ‘and will make it desolate forever. I will bring on that land all the things I have spoken against it, all that are written in this book and prophesied by Jeremiah against all the nations. They themselves will be enslaved by many nations and great kings; I will repay them according to their deeds and the work of their hands.’”Jeremiah 29:10-14“This is what the Lord says: ‘When seventy years are completed for Babylon, I will come to you and fulfill my good promise to bring you back to this place. For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart. I will be found by you,’ declares the Lord, ‘and will bring you back from captivity. I will gather you from all the nations and places where I have banished you,’ declares the Lord, ‘and will bring you back to the place from which I carried you into exile.’”Tim notes that this is a very famous verse in the Bible, but many people aren’t aware of its original context—a promise from God that Israel will return from exile.In part 3 (27:30–46:45), Tim dives into Daniel 9:20, a passage commonly known as “the seventy sevens.”Daniel 9:20-27“While I was speaking and praying, confessing my sin and the sin of my people Israel and making my request to the Lord my God for his holy hill—while I was still in prayer, Gabriel, the man I had seen in the earlier vision, came to me in swift flight about the time of the evening sacrifice. He instructed me and said to me, ‘Daniel, I have now come to give you insight and understanding. As soon as you began to pray, a word went out, which I have come to tell you, for you are highly esteemed. Therefore, consider the word and understand the vision: Seventy “sevens” are decreed for your people and your holy city to finish transgression, to put an end to sin, to atone for wickedness, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up vision and prophecy and to anoint the Most Holy Place.’“‘Know and understand this: from the time the word goes out to restore and rebuild Jerusalem until the Anointed One, the ruler, comes, there will be seven sevens, and sixty-two sevens. It will be rebuilt with streets and a trench, but in times of trouble. After the sixty-two sevens, the Anointed One will be put to death and will have nothing. The people of the ruler who will come will destroy the city and the sanctuary. The end will come like a flood: war will continue until the end, and desolations have been decreed. He will confirm a covenant with many for one seven. In the middle of the seven he will put an end to sacrifice and offering. And at the temple he will set up an abomination that causes desolation, until the end that is decreed is poured out on him.’”This passage, Tim says, maps directly onto the two Jeremiah prophecies.Tim notes that Daniel would have been heartbroken because he was hoping that this would have been a proclamation of good news that Israel would return from exile. Instead, the message is that Israel has a long way to go in its exile.There are many ways to read and interpret the 490 years (seventy sevens) in Daniel 9. Tim shares about a study from scholar Roger Beckwith, who has done an enormous study on the various interpretations of Daniel 9 in his paper, “Daniel 9 and the Date of Messiah’s Coming in Essene, Hellenistic, Pharisaic, Zealot and Early Christian Computation” (see show resources for link).In part 4 (46:45–end), Tim and Jon cover an important prophecy in Isaiah about a coming jubilee.Isaiah 61:1-3“The Spirit of the Sovereign Lord is on me,because the Lord has anointed meto proclaim good news to the poor.He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted,to proclaim freedom for the captivesand release from darkness for the prisoners,to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favorand the day of vengeance of our God,to comfort all who mourn,and provide for those who grieve in Zion—to bestow on them a crown of beautyinstead of ashes,the oil of joyinstead of mourning,and a garment of praiseinstead of a spirit of despair.They will be called oaks of righteousness,a planting of the Lordfor the display of his splendor.”Tim shares a quote from scholar Bradley Gregory in his essay on Isaiah 61, called “The Post Exilic Exile in Isaiah.”“In Isaiah 40-55, the Babylonian exile is understood as an image of the Egyptian captivity. In the last ten chapters of Isaiah (56-66), the oppressive situation in Jerusalem after the exile has become another symbol. One gets the impression that the author doesn’t see the situation after the exile as any better than the situation in Babylon or enslaved in ancient Egypt. In all cases Israel is shackled because of sin, awaiting deliverance by Yahweh. The prescriptions for the jubilee have been eschatologized—the jubilee is now a metaphor and an image for a future hope. Isaiah has moved the concept for jubilee from a law to a concept of future deliverance.” Show Resources:Roger T. Beckwith, “Daniel 9 and the Date of Messiah’s Coming in Essene, Hellenistic, Pharisaic, Zealot and Early Christian Computation” Bradley C. Gregory, “The Postexilic Exile in Third Isaiah: Isaiah 61:1-3 in Light of Second Temple Hermeneutics” Show Music:Mind your Time by Me.SoExcellent by Beautiful EulogyGood Grief by Beautiful Eulogy Produced by Dan Gummel. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/9/20191 hour, 4 minutes, 38 seconds
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Rest for the Land - 7th Day Rest E9

KEY TAKEAWAYS The land is entitled to a Sabbath rest as a part of the Torah commandments.If Israel disobeys the Torah and does not allow the land to rest, they will be punished by God, including being sent into exile.Romans 8 is similar to Leviticus 26. The land (creation) is waiting for its release from bondage, which will occur when humans attain their release from their bondage.QUOTE“What we call the natural world in the biblical story is an existence with humans living at odds with our real nature and our environment. (The Land) is not ours to do what we want with.”SHOW NOTESIn part 1 (0-18:35), Tim and Jon review the conversation so far and quickly go over the Jewish festival calendar year to recap how it reflects the theme of seventh-day rest. They also discuss the Year of Jubilee.In part 2 (18:35-32:40), Tim shares from Leviticus 26 and talks about the “covenant curses” that God pronounces. If Israel disobeys the commands, they will be exiled. Their exile is portrayed an inverted jubilee. Covenant loyalty will result in Eden blessing, freedom, abundance, and security, much like the jubilee.Leviticus 26:3-13“If you walk in my statutes and keep my commandments so as to carry them out, then I shall give you rains in their season, so that the land will yield its produce and the trees of the field will bear their fruit. Indeed, your threshing will last for you until grape gathering, and grape gathering will last until sowing time. You will thus eat your food to the full (Heb. שבע, seven) and live securely in your land.“I shall also grant peace in the land, so that you may lie down with no one making you tremble. I shall also eliminate harmful beasts from the land, and no sword will pass through your land…“So I will turn toward you and make you fruitful and multiply you, and I will confirm my covenant with you. You will eat the old supply and clear out the old because of the new. Moreover, I will make my dwelling among you, and my soul will not reject you. I will also walk among you (cf.  Genesis 3:8) and be your God, and you shall be my people. I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt so that you would not be their slaves, and I broke the bars of your yoke and made you walk erect.”Tim says the takeaway from this passage is that covenant violation will result in seven anti-jubilee curses, slavery, poverty, and oppression, which is also portrayed with symbolic seven imagery.Leviticus 26:14-18, 21, 23-24, 27-28, 33-35“But if you will not listen to me and carry out all these commands, and if you reject my decrees and abhor my laws and fail to carry out all my commands and so violate my covenant, then I will do this to you: I will bring on you sudden terror, wasting diseases and fever that will destroy your sight and sap your strength. You will plant seed in vain, because your enemies will eat it. I will set my face against you so that you will be defeated by your enemies; those who hate you will rule over you, and you will flee even when no one is pursuing you.“If after all this you will not listen to me, I will discipline you for your sins seven times over.“If you remain hostile toward me and refuse to listen to me, I will multiply your afflictions seven times over, as your sins deserve.“If in spite of these things you do not accept my correction but continue to be hostile toward me, I myself will be hostile toward you and will afflict you for your sins seven times over.“If in spite of this you still do not listen to me but continue to be hostile toward me, then in my anger I will be hostile toward you, and I myself will discipline you for your sins seven times over.“I will scatter you among the nations and will draw out my sword and pursue you. Your land will be laid waste, and your cities will lie in ruins. Then the land will enjoy its sabbath years all the time that it lies desolate and you are in the country of your enemies; then the land will rest and enjoy its sabbaths. All the time that it lies desolate, the land will have the rest it did not have during the sabbaths you lived in it.”Jon notes that Western culture allows us to think that we own land. However, owning land in ancient Israel wasn’t reality. Instead, the land would return to the family originally entrusted with it every fifty years. God considers the land to be his, and Israel is tenants upon it.In part 3 (32:40-end), Tim finishes Leviticus 26.Leviticus 26:40-45“If they confess their iniquity and the iniquity of their forefathers, in their unfaithfulness which they committed against me, and also in their acting with hostility against me… or if their uncircumcised heart becomes humbled so that they then make amends for their iniquity, then I will remember my covenant with Jacob, and I will remember also my covenant with Isaac, and my covenant with Abraham as well, and I will remember the land. For the land will be abandoned by them, and will make up for its sabbaths while it is made desolate without them.“Yet in spite of this, when they are in the land of their enemies, I will not reject them, nor will I so abhor them as to destroy them, breaking my covenant with them; for I am the Lord their God. But I will remember for them the covenant with their ancestors, whom I brought out of the land of Egypt in the sight of the nations, that I might be their God. I am the Lord.”Tim notes that the same logic that gives the land rest in Leviticus 26 also appears in the New Testament, when Paul writes in Romans 8.Romans 8:19-23“For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the children of God; for the creation was subjected to futility, not of its own will but by the will of the one who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to decay and will obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God. We know that the whole creation has been groaning in labor pains until now; and not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly while we wait for adoption, the redemption of our bodies.”Creation will be liberated from its bondage when humans are liberated from theirs. Show Resources:Hittite King Suppiluliuma (Wikipedia) Show Music:Defender Instrumental by TentsAlways Home by Ian EwingThe Size of Grace by Beautiful Eulogy Show Produced by:Dan Gummel Join the Bible Project!thebibleproject.com/visionPowered and distributed by Simplecast.
12/2/201943 minutes, 51 seconds
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Jubilee: The Radical Year of Release - 7th Day Rest E8

QUOTE“Since it occurred usually only once a lifetime, an impoverished Israelite would spend most of his life anticipating this event of restoration. So when we get to Jesus and the Jesus movement, it was a jubilee movement. Jesus started his mission by reading from Isaiah 61. He said it’s the favorable year of the Lord, the year of release.”KEY TAKEAWAYSThe Year of Jubilee in Leviticus 25 is one of the most radical ideas in the Bible. Every 50 years, every Israelite was supposed to return to their original piece of allotted land.The jubilee would have effectively prevented cycles of intergenerational poverty and create a social and economic parity that would make Israel unique among all nations.Jesus announced that he was enacting the Year of Jubilee when he launched his public ministry.SHOW NOTESIn part 1 (0-7:30), the guys quickly review the conversation so far.In part 2 (7:30-21:30), Tim dives into Leviticus 24.Leviticus 24:1-4“The Lord said to Moses, ‘Command the Israelites to bring you clear oil of pressed olives for the light so that the lamps may be kept burning continually. Outside the curtain that shields the ark of the covenant law in the tent of meeting, Aaron is to tend the lamps before the Lord from evening till morning, continually. This is to be a lasting ordinance for the generations to come. The lamps on the pure gold lampstand before the Lord must be tended continually.’”Tim shares a quote from Jacob Milgrom.“There are three kinds of oil. The first when the olives are pounded in order and put into a basket, and the oil oozes out. Rabbi Judah says, ‘Around the basket and around the sides, the oil that runs out of the basket, this gives the first oil…. The first oil is fit for lampstands.’”Tim and Jon observe that the first oil would be the safest, least likely to smoke. This would keep the soot for accumulating in the rooms where it is burning.Tim makes several observations about the lamp from Leviticus 24.The lamp (מאור / ma’or) is attended to every evening so that its light burns perpetually (“from evening to evening,” borrowing language from Genesis 1).The lamp is described with the vocabulary of the sun, moon, and stars in Genesis 1. They are symbols of the divine glory and markers “for signs and for seasons”—that is, for the appointed feasts (Gen. 1:14-16).The lamp is a symbol of the divine light that perpetually shines upon Israel, who is represented by the bread. Numbers 8:1-4 tells us that the light of the menorah “will give light in the front of the lampstand” (v. 2), shining in the direction of the bread.Leviticus 24:5-9 says that the bread is to be placed directly across from the light. Just as new bread is baked every Sabbath, so Israel is “recreated” every Sabbath. This bread is called “an eternal covenant” (Lev. 24:8), meaning it’s a symbol of the eternal relationship between God and Israel.Tim shares this quote from Michael Morales:“The menorah lampstand contains the same seven-fold structure, symbolizing the entire seven-part structure of time provided by the heavenly lights…. Just as the cosmos was created for humanity’s Sabbath communion and fellowship with God, so too tabernacle was established for Israel’s Sabbath communion and fellowship with God “every day of the Sabbath” (Lev 24:8). This ritual drama of the lights and the bread, symbolizes the ideal Sabbath, the tribes of Israel basking in the divine light, being renewed in God’s presence Sabbath by Sabbath.”(Michael Morales, Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord, 189-190 [with embedded quote by Vern Poythress].)In part 3 (21:30-36:00), Tim dives into Leviticus 25 and the practice of jubilee.Leviticus 25:1-55“The Lord said to Moses at Mount Sinai, ‘Speak to the Israelites and say to them: “When you enter the land I am going to give you, the land itself must observe a sabbath to the Lord. For six years sow your fields, and for six years prune your vineyards and gather their crops. But in the seventh year the land is to have a year of sabbath rest, a sabbath to the Lord. Do not sow your fields or prune your vineyards. Do not reap what grows of itself or harvest the grapes of your untended vines. The land is to have a year of rest. Whatever the land yields during the sabbath year will be food for you—for yourself, your male and female servants, and the hired worker and temporary resident who live among you, as well as for your livestock and the wild animals in your land. Whatever the land produces may be eaten.‘“Count off seven sabbath years—seven times seven years—so that the seven sabbath years amount to a period of forty-nine years. Then have the trumpet sounded everywhere on the tenth day of the seventh month; on the Day of Atonement sound the trumpet throughout your land. Consecrate the fiftieth year and proclaim liberty throughout the land to all its inhabitants. It shall be a jubilee for you; each of you is to return to your family property and to your own clan. The fiftieth year shall be a jubilee for you; do not sow and do not reap what grows of itself or harvest the untended vines. For it is a jubilee and is to be holy for you; eat only what is taken directly from the fields.‘“In this Year of Jubilee everyone is to return to their own property. If you sell land to any of your own people or buy land from them, do not take advantage of each other. You are to buy from your own people on the basis of the number of years since the Jubilee. And they are to sell to you on the basis of the number of years left for harvesting crops. When the years are many, you are to increase the price, and when the years are few, you are to decrease the price, because what is really being sold to you is the number of crops. Do not take advantage of each other, but fear your God. I am the Lord your God.‘“Follow my decrees and be careful to obey my laws, and you will live safely in the land. Then the land will yield its fruit, and you will eat your fill and live there in safety. You may ask, ‘What will we eat in the seventh year if we do not plant or harvest our crops?’ I will send you such a blessing in the sixth year that the land will yield enough for three years. While you plant during the eighth year, you will eat from the old crop and will continue to eat from it until the harvest of the ninth year comes in.‘“The land must not be sold permanently, because the land is mine and you reside in my land as foreigners and strangers. Throughout the land that you hold as a possession, you must provide for the redemption of the land.‘“If one of your fellow Israelites becomes poor and sells some of their property, their nearest relative is to come and redeem what they have sold. If, however, there is no one to redeem it for them but later on they prosper and acquire sufficient means to redeem it themselves, they are to determine the value for the years since they sold it and refund the balance to the one to whom they sold it; they can then go back to their own property. But if they do not acquire the means to repay, what was sold will remain in the possession of the buyer until the Year of Jubilee. It will be returned in the Jubilee, and they can then go back to their property.‘“Anyone who sells a house in a walled city retains the right of redemption a full year after its sale. During that time the seller may redeem it. If it is not redeemed before a full year has passed, the house in the walled city shall belong permanently to the buyer and the buyer’s descendants. It is not to be returned in the Jubilee. But houses in villages without walls around them are to be considered as belonging to the open country. They can be redeemed, and they are to be returned in the Jubilee.‘“The Levites always have the right to redeem their houses in the Levitical towns, which they possess. So the property of the Levites is redeemable—that is, a house sold in any town they hold—and is to be returned in the Jubilee, because the houses in the towns of the Levites are their property among the Israelites. But the pastureland belonging to their towns must not be sold; it is their permanent possession.‘“If any of your fellow Israelites become poor and are unable to support themselves among you, help them as you would a foreigner and stranger, so they can continue to live among you. Do not take interest or any profit from them, but fear your God, so that they may continue to live among you. You must not lend them money at interest or sell them food at a profit. I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of Egypt to give you the land of Canaan and to be your God.‘“If any of your fellow Israelites become poor and sell themselves to you, do not make them work as slaves. They are to be treated as hired workers or temporary residents among you; they are to work for you until the Year of Jubilee. Then they and their children are to be released, and they will go back to their own clans and to the property of their ancestors. Because the Israelites are my servants, whom I brought out of Egypt, they must not be sold as slaves. Do not rule over them ruthlessly, but fear your God.‘“Your male and female slaves are to come from the nations around you; from them you may buy slaves. You may also buy some of the temporary residents living among you and members of their clans born in your country, and they will become your property. You can bequeath them to your children as inherited property and can make them slaves for life, but you must not rule over your fellow Israelites ruthlessly.‘“If a foreigner residing among you becomes rich and any of your fellow Israelites become poor and sell themselves to the foreigner or to a member of the foreigner’s clan, they retain the right of redemption after they have sold themselves. One of their relatives may redeem them: An uncle or a cousin or any blood relative in their clan may redeem them. Or if they prosper, they may redeem themselves. They and their buyer are to count the time from the year they sold themselves up to the Year of Jubilee. The price for their release is to be based on the rate paid to a hired worker for that number of years. If many years remain, they must pay for their redemption a larger share of the price paid for them. If only a few years remain until the Year of Jubilee, they are to compute that and pay for their redemption accordingly. They are to be treated as workers hired from year to year; you must see to it that those to whom they owe service do not rule over them ruthlessly.‘“Even if someone is not redeemed in any of these ways, they and their children are to be released in the Year of Jubilee, for the Israelites belong to me as servants. They are my servants, whom I brought out of Egypt. I am the Lord your God.”’”Tim makes a few observations about the practice of jubilee and the Year of Jubilee. Giving people back their ancestral land would prevent the formation of monopolies and land owner dynasties. It would be a consistent (about once a lifetime) check to level the economic playing field of ancient Israel.Tim also notes that there are no narrative stories about Israel actually observing this Year of Jubilee. This causes some scholars to wonder whether the jubilee ever happened, or whether it was set up as an ideal to aspire to.Tim says that jubilee anticipates a future restoration. He shares a quote from scholar John Bergsma.“There is something inherently ‘eschatological’ about the jubilee, long before it was seen as a symbol of the eschaton by later writers. Since it recurred usually only once in a lifetime, the impoverished Israelite—or at least the one projected by the text—would spend most of his life in anticipation of this event of restoration. Also, from the perspective of the entire Pentateuch, the conquest and settlement of Canaan was a kind of ‘realized eschatology’—the fulfillment of the promise of the land of Canaan originally made to Abraham. Leviticus 25—in its present position in the Pentateuch—looks forward to the time when the ‘eschatological’ condition of Israel dwelling within her own land will be realized, and enacts measures to ensure that periodically this utopian, ‘eschatological’ state of Israel will be renewed and restored.”(John Bergsma, The Jubilee from Leviticus to Qumran: A History of Interpretation, 81)In part 4 (36:00-end), Tim and Jon talk about how the jubilee crosses into social, economic, and political views. Tim notes that Jesus launched his movement by declaring that the Year of Jubilee had arrived.Thank you to all our supporters!Show Resources:John Bergsma, The Jubilee from Leviticus to Qumran: A History of InterpretationMichael Morales, Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord? A Biblical Theology of the Book of LeviticusJacob Milgrom, Leviticus, Anchor Yale Bible CommentaryShow Music:Defender Instrumental: TentsShow produced by Dan GummelHave a question? Send it to us [email protected] and distributed by Simplecast.
11/25/201957 minutes, 57 seconds
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7th Day Rest Q&R #1 - 7th Day Rest E7

7th Day Q+R 1Sam from Ohio (1:55): “I've heard you use the phrase that the Hebrew authors are in conversation with their Canaanite neighbors. In the creation narratives, when the Hebrew authors use the word avodah—for slave labor or work—are they saying something significant to their Canaanite neighbors, who in some of their creation accounts claim that the gods created humans to be their slaves? Is the word avodah tied to a unique claim that the Hebrew authors are trying to make about the relationship between God, work, and rest?”Laura from Missouri (11:46): “As you were talking about sacred time built into the fabric of creation—particularly how the sun, moon, and stars are indented to mark the days and times for seasons and feasts—would these things still have been the case if the fall did not occur? Were these intended to be part of the people of God regardless of the fall? And if so, what would they be looking back to or forward to?”Mike from South Africa (22:20): “Is the number seven a divine construct imported into the Israelite thinking? Or is it (or was it) an already established cultural idea that God just adopted to teach something that they would have understood if you spoke in their language?”Brianna from Wisconsin (32:35): “I have a question about the flood narrative, and what’s going on there with all the uses of time and sevens that keep getting repeated. I’m wondering if all the references to time are supposed to get mapped onto Israel’s calendar and the feast days? And if so, does that somehow tie into Noah and his name meaning “rest?” What are we meant to see there with all the reference to time and sevens and the idea that Noah is rest and bringing rest into the world.”John from Virginia (43:27): “You mention that the Exodus story participates with days one, two, and three of the creation account. I was wondering if there was anything following that that maps onto days four, five, and six that maps onto the new Eden.”Show musicDefender Instrumental by TentsShow Produced by Dan GummelPowered and Distributed by Simplecast.
11/21/201953 minutes, 51 seconds
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The Seven Festivals - 7th Day Rest E6

QUOTE“The Holy One, blessed be He, created seven ages, and of them all He chose the seventh age only, the six ages are for the going in and coming out (of God’s creatures) for war and peace. The seventh age is entirely Sabbath and rest in the life everlasting.” – Rabbi EliezerKEY TAKEAWAYSThe seven festivals or feasts in the Jewish sacred calendar are integral to understanding the theme of the seventh-day rest in the Bible.These feasts have symbolic meaning connecting back to the creation account in Genesis and the story of the Exodus. They are meant to act as a way to remember and teach.SHOW NOTESIn part 1 (0-16:10), Tim and Jon recap the conversation so far, including the story of God giving Moses the Ten Commandments and instructions for the tabernacle. Interestingly, Tim notes that he isn’t pointing out all the layers of seven in the Bible, just highlighting some of the significant ones. For example, Moses goes up and down the mountain to commune with God seven times in the whole story of the TaNaK.Tim moves into the next part of the story. God is now dwelling in the tabernacle, also known as the tent of meeting. Unfortunately, God’s presence is so intense that no one can go in.In part 2 (16:10-25:00), Tim expands on the theme of Sabbath in Exodus.Exodus 23:9-12 Do not oppress a foreigner; you yourselves know how it feels to be foreigners, because you were foreigners in Egypt. For six years you are to sow your fields and harvest the crops, but during the seventh year let the land lie unplowed and unused. Then the poor among your people may get food from it, and the wild animals may eat what is left. Do the same with your vineyard and your olive grove.Six days do your work, but on the seventh day do not work, so that your ox and your donkey may rest, and so that the slave born in your household and the foreigner living among you may be refreshed.Tim observes that Sabbath rest isn’t just for the Jews. It’s also rest for the servants, the land, and the animals. All of creation is called to participate in seventh-day rest.In part 3 (25:00-35:00), Tim looks at a passage from Deuteronomy 15. Deuteronomy 15:1-6At the end of every seven years you must cancel debts. This is how it is to be done: Every creditor shall cancel any loan they have made to a fellow Israelite. They shall not require payment from anyone among their own people, because the Lord’s time for canceling debts has been proclaimed. You may require payment from a foreigner, but you must cancel any debt your fellow Israelite owes you. However, there need be no poor people among you, for in the land the Lord your God is giving you to possess as your inheritance, he will richly bless you, if only you fully obey the Lord your God and are careful to follow all these commands I am giving you today. For the Lord your God will bless you as he has promised, and you will lend to many nations but will borrow from none. You will rule over many nations but none will rule over you.Cancelling debts would sometimes happen in the ancient world when a new ruler came into power as an act of political and social favor. What’s unique about the Jewish idea in Deuteronomy, Tim notes, is that this release from debts is meant to be observed independently of any kingship or political system.In part 4 (35:00-44:00), Tim goes back to Leviticus to trace out the appointed feasts.Leviticus 23:2-4The Lord said to Moses, “Speak to the Israelites and say to them: ‘These are my appointed festivals, the appointed festivals of the Lord, which you are to proclaim as sacred assemblies. There are six days when you may work, but the seventh day is a day of sabbath rest, a day of sacred assembly. You are not to do any work; wherever you live, it is a sabbath to the Lord.These are the Lord’s appointed festivals, the sacred assemblies you are to proclaim at their appointed times.’”Here’s a simple way to lay out the sabbath and the appointed festivals.1. SabbathThe seventh day of each week.Duration: one dayRestrictions: no work2. Passover & Unleavened BreadThe first feast of the year.Duration: one day plus seven daysRestrictions: no work on the first and seventh days3. FirstfruitsHeld the day after the seventh day of PassoverDuration: one day4. The Feast of Weeks (Pentecost)Seven times seven and one days after PassoverDuration: one dayRestrictions: no work5. TrumpetsFirst day of the seventh monthDuration: one dayRestrictions: no work6. Day of AtonementTenth day of the seventh monthDuration: one dayRestrictions: no work7. TabernaclesMiddle of the seventh month (7/15-7/21)Duration: seven daysRestrictions: no work on the first and seventh days(Numbers 5-7 are commonly known as "The Days of Awe")The Sabbath represented a burst of Eden rest into ordinary time. These seven feasts all participate and develop aspects of the meaning of the original Sabbath.Passover and Unleavened Bread: redemption from death (new creation) and commitment to simplicity and trust in God’s power to provide food in the wildernessFirstfruits and Weeks: celebrating the gift of produce from the landTrumpets: announcing the sabbatical (seventh) monthDay of Atonement: God’s renewing the holiness of his Eden presence among his compromised peopleTabernacles: provision for God’s people on their way to the Promised Land. They are to act like they are living in God’s tent for a Sabbath cycle. “And you will take the fruit of the beautiful tree, the branches of a palm, and branches of a tree of leaf and of poplar trees by a river, and you shall rejoice before Yahweh for seven days” (Leviticus 23:40). Israel is called to rest in a mini-Eden tent made of the fruit of a beautiful tree for a Sabbath cycle!The dates of these feasts float independently of the perpetual seventh-day cycle. Occasionally, when a feast falls on the Sabbath, it becomes extra special. For example, passover falls on the Sabbath during Jesus’ week of passion when he is crucified.In part 5 (44:00-47:45), Tim moves on and discusses the Feast of Firstfruits and the Feast of Weeks / Pentecost.In part 6 (47:45-end), Tim covers the last three festivals: the Festival of Trumpets, the Day of Atonement, and the Feast of Tabernacles.Tim notes that there are lots of overlapping calendars in the Hebrew Bible, and it can be difficult to keep them all straight. In modern times we have calendars like “the school year,” “the financial year,” “the sports year,” etc. All of these years and calendars overlay on our actual year in a different way. This is true of feasts in the Bible as well.These last few feasts are commonly regarded as “the days of awe and wonder” in modern Jewish life. The Festival of Trumpets is now known as Rosh Hashanah. This is would have been considered the Jewish New Year. The Day of Atonement is the next holiday where a symbolic goat takes Israel’s sins out of the camp. The Feast of Tabernacles is last. This feast is meant to reenact the Israelite wandering and journey in the wilderness. Israelites are expected to not work for seven days and camp out.Tim quotes from Pirke de Rabbi Eliezer.“The Holy One, blessed be He, created seven ages, and of them all He chose the seventh age only, the six ages are for the going in and coming out (of God’s creatures) for war and peace. The seventh age is entirely Sabbath and rest in the life everlasting.”Thank you to all our supporters! Have a question for us? Send it to [email protected] love reading your reviews of our show!Show Music:Defender Instrumental by TentsLost Love by Too NorthFor When It’s Warmer by Sleepy FishAmbedo by Too NorthShot in the Back of the Head by MobyShine by MobyShow Resources:Michael Morales, Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord, A biblical theology of the book of Leviticus.Quote from Rabbi Eliezer can be found in Samuel Bacchiochi, “Matthew 11:28-30: Jesus’ Rest and the Sabbath,” pp. 297-99. Show Produced by: Dan Gummel Powered and Distributed by Simplecast.
11/18/20191 hour, 7 minutes, 23 seconds
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The Cathedral in Time - 7th Day Rest E5

QUOTE"The Sabbath is to time what the tabernacle and temple are to space: a cathedral in time. On the seventh day, we experience in time what the temple and tabernacle represented in spaces, which is eternal life with God in a complete creation."KEY TAKEAWAYSThe building of the tabernacle in Exodus 40 has deep connections with the theme of seventh-day rest and the creation account in Genesis.The tabernacle is presented as a mini cosmos, brought into being by the seven acts of divine speech by God. When Moses builds this symbolic mini cosmos, seven times over he obeys the divine command.SHOW NOTES:In part 1 (0-8:30), Tim and Jon recap their conversation so far. They go over the story of the Passover and review how it reflects the creation account in Genesis.In part 2 (8:30-22:30), Tim transitions to the story of Israel collecting manna in the wilderness in Exodus 16.Exodus 16:4-35Then the Lord said to Moses, “Behold, I am about to rain bread from heaven for you, and the people shall go out and gather a day's portion every day, that I may test them, whether they will walk in my law or not. On the sixth day, when they prepare what they bring in, it will be twice as much as they gather daily.” So Moses and Aaron said to all the people of Israel, “At evening you shall know that it was the Lord who brought you out of the land of Egypt, and in the morning you shall see the glory of the Lord, because he has heard your grumbling against the Lord. For what are we, that you grumble against us?” And Moses said, “When the Lord gives you in the evening meat to eat and in the morning bread to the full, because the Lord has heard your grumbling that you grumble against him—what are we? Your grumbling is not against us but against the Lord.”Then Moses said to Aaron, “Say to the whole congregation of the people of Israel, ‘Come near before the Lord, for he has heard your grumbling.’” And as soon as Aaron spoke to the whole congregation of the people of Israel, they looked toward the wilderness, and behold, the glory of the Lord appeared in the cloud. And the Lord said to Moses, “I have heard the grumbling of the people of Israel. Say to them, ‘At twilight you shall eat meat, and in the morning you shall be filled with bread. Then you shall know that I am the Lord your God.’”In the evening quail came up and covered the camp, and in the morning dew lay around the camp. And when the dew had gone up, there was on the face of the wilderness a fine, flake-like thing, fine as frost on the ground. When the people of Israel saw it, they said to one another, “What is it? For they did not know what it was. And Moses said to them, “It is the bread that the Lord has given you to eat. This is what the Lord has commanded: ‘Gather of it, each one of you, as much as he can eat. You shall each take an omer, according to the number of the persons that each of you has in his tent.’” And the people of Israel did so. They gathered, some more, some less. But when they measured it with an omer, whoever gathered much had nothing left over, and whoever gathered little had no lack. Each of them gathered as much as he could eat. And Moses said to them, “Let no one leave any of it over till the morning.” But they did not listen to Moses. Some left part of it till the morning, and it bred worms and stank. And Moses was angry with them. Morning by morning they gathered it, each as much as he could eat; but when the sun grew hot, it melted.On the sixth day they gathered twice as much bread, two omers each. And when all the leaders of the congregation came and told Moses, he said to them, “This is what the Lord has commanded: ‘Tomorrow is a day of solemn rest, a holy Sabbath to the Lord; bake what you will bake and boil what you will boil, and all that is left over lay aside to be kept till the morning.’” So they laid it aside till the morning, as Moses commanded them, and it did not stink, and there were no worms in it. Moses said, “Eat it today, for today is a Sabbath to the Lord; today you will not find it in the field. Six days you shall gather it, but on the seventh day, which is a Sabbath, there will be none.”On the seventh day some of the people went out to gather, but they found none. And the Lord said to Moses, “How long will you refuse to keep my commandments and my laws? See! The Lord has given you the Sabbath; therefore on the sixth day he gives you bread for two days. Remain each of you in his place; let no one go out of his place on the seventh day.” So the people rested on the seventh day.Now the house of Israel called its name manna. It was like coriander seed, white, and the taste of it was like wafers made with honey. Moses said, “This is what the Lord has commanded: ‘Let an omer of it be kept throughout your generations, so that they may see the bread with which I fed you in the wilderness, when I brought you out of the land of Egypt.’” And Moses said to Aaron, “Take a jar, and put an omer of manna in it, and place it before the Lord to be kept throughout your generations.” As the Lord commanded Moses, so Aaron placed it before the testimony to be kept. The people of Israel ate the manna forty years, till they came to a habitable land. They ate the manna till they came to the border of the land of Canaan.Tim notes that manna was supposed to be a little taste of the new creation. Manna was a new work of creation that violated normal creation while also fitting within God’s ideal purpose for creation (i.e., within the seven-day scheme). Manna was a divine gift that came from proximity to the divine glory (Ex 16:9-10). This miraculous provision didn’t behave like normal food, and there was more than enough each day, no matter how much was gathered.Tim also shares that the rhythms of gathering and not gathering on the Sabbath is an imitation of God’s own patterns of work and rest in Genesis 1. Similarly, God announced “good” days one through six and “very good” on day seven. This parallels with Israel collecting manna on days one through six and “double manna” on day seven. Furthermore, on the seventh day God “rested” (took up residence in his temple), and on the seventh day Israel “rests” and Moses “rested” a perpetual sample of manna “before Yahweh” and “before the testimony.”Tim cites scholar Stephen Geller:“... manna is presented as a new work of creation that disrupts the established order of creation. In fact, there is a clear parallelism between the creation account in Gen 1-2:4 and Exod 16. In both passages there is a dichotomy between the first six days and the seventh day. In Gen 1, the work of each day is stated by God to be "good," a term that marks its completion. But on the sixth day the phrase "very good" marks the completion not just of the acts of creation on that day, but of the first six days as a whole. Genesis 2:1 states explicitly that "the heaven and earth were completed." Yet, to the perplex­ity of exegesis, the very next verse says that "God completed on the seventh day the work he did and ceased on the seventh day all work he did." The second of these two statements must be viewed as an explanation of the first: God completed his work by ceasing.”(Stephen Geller, “Exodus 16: A Literary and Theological Reading,” Interpretation vol. (2005), p. 13.)In part 3 (22:30-36:30), the guys dive into the actual Sabbath command as part of the Ten Commandments, which is given in seven Hebrew sentences. The Sabbath command in Exodus 20:8-11 is expressed in seven statements arranged in a chiastic symmetry. Tim says this is another fascinating layer of the theme of seventh-day rest in the Bible.Exodus 20:8-11A – Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy.B – Six days you will laborC – and do all your work,D – but the seventh day is a sabbath of the Lord your God;C’ – you shall not do any work,you or your son or your daughter, your male or your female servant,or your cattle or your sojourner who stays with you.B’ – For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth,the sea and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day;A’ – therefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day and made it holy.Tim cites scholar Leigh Trevaskis to make his point:“The sabbatical rest seems to remind Israel of her covenant obligations as YHWH’s new creation. Though this rest is more immediately connected to the exodus in these chapters, it has its roots in the creation story (Gen 2:1-3; cf. Exod 20:11) and by connecting Israel’s remembrance of her redemption from Egypt with the sabbatical rest, the exodus becomes infused with further theological significance: just as Gods seventh day rest in the creation story marks the emergence of his new creation, so does Israel’s sabbatical rest attest to her emergence as YHWH’s new creation through his act of redemption. And since her identity as a new creation is tied up with the covenant (cf. Exod 15:1-19; 19:4-5), Israel’s sabbatical rests… presumably recall her obligation to remain faithful to this covenant, encouraging her to live according to the Creators will.” (Leigh Trevaskis, “The Purpose of Leviticus 24 within its Literary Context,” 298-299.)Tim then walks through Exodus 24, which is the start of God giving the tabernacle instructions to Moses. This story is a crucial layer to understanding how the building of the tabernacle (the “tent of meeting”) weaves into the theme of seventh-day rest.Exodus 24:1-11Then he said to Moses, “Come up to the Lord, you and Aaron, Nadab, and Abihu, and seventy of the elders of Israel, and worship from afar. Moses alone shall come near to the Lord, but the others shall not come near, and the people shall not come up with him.”Moses came and told the people all the words of the Lord and all the rules. And all the people answered with one voice and said, “All the words that the Lord has spoken we will do.” And Moses wrote down all the words of the Lord. He rose early in the morning and built an altar at the foot of the mountain, and twelve pillars, according to the twelve tribes of Israel. And he sent young men of the people of Israel, who offered burnt offerings and sacrificed peace offerings of oxen to the Lord. And Moses took half of the blood and put it in basins, and half of the blood he threw against the altar. Then he took the Book of the Covenant and read it in the hearing of the people. And they said, “All that the Lord has spoken we will do, and we will be obedient.” And Moses took the blood and threw it on the people and said, “Behold the blood of the covenant that the Lord has made with you in accordance with all these words.”Then Moses and Aaron, Nadab, and Abihu, and seventy of the elders of Israel went up, and they saw the God of Israel. There was under his feet as it were a pavement of sapphire stone, like the very heaven for clearness. And he did not lay his hand on the chief men of the people of Israel; they beheld God, and ate and drank.In part 4 (36:30-49:50), Tim continues the story in Exodus 24.Exodus 24:12-18The Lord said to Moses, “Come up to me on the mountain and wait there, that I may give you the tablets of stone, with the law and the commandment, which I have written for their instruction.” So Moses rose with his assistant Joshua, and Moses went up into the mountain of God. And he said to the elders, “Wait here for us until we return to you. And behold, Aaron and Hur are with you. Whoever has a dispute, let him go to them.” Then Moses went up on the mountain, and the cloud covered the mountain. The glory of the Lord dwelt on Mount Sinai, and the cloud covered it six days. And on the seventh day he called to Moses out of the midst of the cloud. Now the appearance of the glory of the Lord was like a devouring fire on the top of the mountain in the sight of the people of Israel. Moses entered the cloud and went up on the mountain. And Moses was on the mountain forty days and forty nights.Tim notes that the theme of sixth and seventh day is now clearly established. God appears to Moses on the seventh day.Here in Exodus 25-31, God presents Moses with the plans for the tabernacle. These plans are dispensed in seven speeches by God.[1] “And YHWH spoke to Moses, saying…” [Exodus 25:1][2] “And YHWH spoke to Moses, saying…” [Exodus 30:11][3] “And YHWH spoke to Moses, saying…” [Exodus 30:17][4] “And YHWH spoke to Moses, saying…” [Exodus 30:22][5] “And YHWH spoke to Moses, saying…” [Exodus 30:34][6] “And YHWH spoke to Moses, saying…” [Exodus 31:1][7] “And YHWH spoke to Moses, saying…” [Exodus 31:12]The seventh and final act of speech covers the Sabbath.After this, in Exodus 40, the completion of the tabernacle is given with seven statements of Moses completing the work God commanded him.Exodus 40:17-18aAnd it came about in the beginning month, in the second year, on the first of the month, the tabernacle was set up (הוקם), and Moses set up (ותקם) the tabernacle…[1] “…just as Yahweh commanded Moses” [Exodus 40:19][2] “…just as Yahweh commanded Moses” [Exodus 40:21][3] “…just as Yahweh commanded Moses” [Exodus 40:23][4] “…just as Yahweh commanded Moses” [Exodus 40:25][5] “…just as Yahweh commanded Moses” [Exodus 40:27][6] “…just as Yahweh commanded Moses” [Exodus 40:29][7] “…just as Yahweh commanded Moses” [Exodus 40:32]“And Moses completed (ויכל) the work (המלאכה)” [Exodus 40:33b]Tim cites scholar Howard Wallace to make the following point:“The structuring of the narrative in Exodus 25-40 binds the Sabbath observance closely with the construction of the sanctuary. Both are tightly connected with the question of the presence of Yahweh with his people…. The Sabbath is a significant element in the celebration of the presence of Yahweh with his people. Just as the tabernacle was built along lines specified by divine decree, so too in the sequence is the human sabbath institution modeled on the divine pattern. Since the tabernacle, which is patterned on the divine plan, reveals the presence and shares in the role of the heavenly temple to proclaim the sovereignty of Israel’s God, so the Sabbath shares in the proclamation of the sovereignty of Yahweh.”(Howard Wallace, “Creation and Sabbath in Genesis 2:1-3,” 246.)Tim also shares a quote from Rabbi Abraham Heschel.“The sabbath is to time what the temple and tabernacle are to space. The sabbath is a cathedral in time. On the seventh day we experience in time what the tabernacle and temple represented as spaces which is eternal life, God in the complete creation.”(The Sabbath, Abraham Joshua Heschel)In part 5 (49:50-end), the guys finish up their conversation. Tim notes that the cliffhanger at the end of Exodus is that Moses and all of Israel have successfully built the tabernacle (or the tent of meeting) and God then comes to dwell in it, to meet with Israel. But when he does, his presence is too intense, and Moses is unable to go in. So what will happen? Find out next week when we turn to Numbers and Leviticus.Thank you to all our supporters! Show Resources:Howard Wallace, “Creation and Sabbath in Genesis 2:1-3”Abraham Joshua Heschel, The SabbathLeigh Trevaskis, “The Purpose of Leviticus 24 within its Literary Context”Stephen Geller, “Exodus 16: A Literary and Theological Reading” Find all our resources at www.thebibleproject.comShow Music:The Hymn of the Cherubim by TchaikovskyNature by KVFeather by WaywellSolace by Nomyn Show Produced by:Dan Gummel Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/11/201957 minutes, 8 seconds
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Sacred Time & The Feast of Flight - 7th Day Rest E4

QUOTE"Another layer of Genesis is that the first, the middle, and last day are all designed to show God creating structures of time. In the timing of the middle fourth day, God appoints the sun, moon and stars to rule over day and night, and they are to mark the moadim, the sacred feasts, the annual sacred feasts. So the whole sacred calendar of Israel that you’ll meet in Exodus and Leviticus is already baked into the story at the beginning of Genesis. (This is) sacred time."KEY TAKEAWAYSThe Jewish sacred feasts are an integral and overlooked theme in the Bible. They are built into the fabric of the original creation story in Genesis 1:14.Passover is considered to be the most important Jewish holiday. Many biblical themes flow into and out of the idea of the Passover.SHOW NOTESWelcome to our fourth episode discussing the theme of the seventh-day rest in the Bible. In this episode, Tim and Jon look at the Passover and Exodus stories and talk about their importance to the development of this theme.In part 1 (0-12:30), the guys quickly go over the conversation so far. Tim briefly covers the days of creation and notes how God sets up structures of time on days one, four, and seven. These structures are reflected in the Hebrew calendar.In part 2 (12:30-19:30), Tim begins to share broadly about the Hebrew sacred calendar. Tim notes that the Jewish calendar is designed to heavily reflect symbolic “seven” imagery.In part 3 (19:30-37:30), Tim briefly recaps the calling of Abraham that was discussed in the previous episode. Tim notes that Abraham believed that God would bring about an ultimate seventh day. A brief conversation follows about fasting in Christianity as well as a brief discussion on the differences between “hope” and “optimism.” Tim cites scholar Cornel West about the differences between optimism and Christian hope.In part 4 (37:30-43:00), Tim starts to talk about Passover, which originates in the book of Exodus. Tim says that Passover is the most important feast on the Jewish calendar. The Exodus story is presented in cosmic terms on analogy with the Creation story of Genesis 1.In part 5 (43:00-56:20), Tim explains the story of the Exodus and how it maps onto the Genesis story. The powers of evil destroy Israel (i.e. new humanity) through slavery (lit. “working” in Hebrew, עבדה), and through the waters of death. But God acts and rescues Israel. The famous story of the ten plagues are inversions of the ten creative words of God in Genesis 1. All of the plagues “de-create” Egypt back into chaotic darkness.Consider these examples:The Plague of Darkness
Genesis 1:2-3 …and darkness (חשך) was over the surface of the deep…. Then God said, “let there be light (יהי אור)….”Exodus 10:21, 23 …that there may be darkness (ויהי חשך) over the land of Egypt… but for all the sons of Israel, there was light (היה אור) in their dwellings.The Plague of FrogsExodus 7:28And the Nile will swarm (ושרץ) with frogs…Genesis 1:20 …let the waters swarm (שרץ) with every swarming (שרץ) creature…The Plague of LocustsExodus 10:5 [the locusts] will eat every tree (עץ) which sprouts (צמח) for you from the field (השדה).Exodus 10:15 …fruit of the tree…all vegetation in the tree and green thing (ירק) in the field…Genesis 1:29-30 I have given to you for food all vegetation… all the tree which has the fruit of the tree… every green thing (ירק)….Genesis 2:9 …and Yahweh sprouted (צמח) from the ground every tree (עץ)…
Pharaoh sends Israel out of Egypt at night (Exod 12:29, 31, 42) and Israel flees to the edge of the Reed Sea where Pharaoh’s army chases them for a night showdown (Exod 14:20). It’s at night that God parts the waters (Exod 14:21), and during the last watch of the night (Exod 14:24), the Egyptians falter in the midst of the sea, and at sunrise (Exod 14:27) the waters destroy the Egyptians while the Israelites flourish on dry land.Tim says that this story maps directly onto the creation narrative. The passage through the Reed Sea is all days 1-3 together in Genesis.In part 6 (56:20-end), Tim goes to Exodus 15 to discuss the first “worship song” in the Bible.Exodus 15:10-13, 17-18
You blew with your wind, the sea covered them;
They sank like lead in the mighty waters.
Who is like you among the gods, O Lord?
Who is like you, majestic in holiness,
Awesome in praises, working wonders?
You stretched out your right hand,
The earth swallowed them.
In your lovingkindness you have led the people whom you have redeemed;
In your strength you have guided them to your holy habitation.You will bring them and plant them in the mountain of your inheritance,
The place of your dwelling (שבתך / shibteka / Sabbath!), which you have made,
The sanctuary, O Lord, which your hands have established.
The Lord shall reign forever and ever.Tim notes that the English word “dwelling” in verse 17 is a wordplay on the word “sabbath,” because it is composed of the same letters.Tim then discusses more details about the Passover and why its importance in the Bible. The Passover is on the 14th (2 x 7) and is followed by a seven day festival of unleavened bread (15th – 21st), that begins and ends with a “super sabbath” rest.In Exodus 12:1-2, the new beginning given by God as he says, “beginning of the months, the beginning it is for you,” parallels with Genesis 1:1, “In the beginning….” Passover is compared to creation as a seven-day ritual the restarts the calendar, like a new creation.Tim then dives back into Exodus 12:14-16, 34, 39.Now this day will be a memorial to you, and you shall celebrate it as a feast to the Lord; throughout your generations you are to celebrate it as a permanent ordinance. Seven days you shall eat unleavened bread, but on the first day you shall remove leaven from your houses; for whoever eats anything leavened from the first day until the seventh day, that person shall be cut off from Israel. On the first day you shall have a holy assembly, and another holy assembly on the seventh day; no work at all shall be done on them, except what must be eaten by every person, that alone may be prepared by you.So the people took their dough before it was leavened, with their kneading bowls bound up in the clothes on their shoulders.They baked the dough which they had brought out of Egypt into cakes of unleavened bread. For it had not become leavened, since they were driven out of Egypt and could not delay, nor had they prepared any provisions for themselves.Tim makes the following observations:12:15 – “For seven days you are to put to rest (תשביתו) all leaven (שאר) from your houses.” For the resonance of “leaven” שאר with “remnant” שאר, continue reading for the comparison of Passover and the flood.12:16 – “on the first day it is a holy convocation, and on the seventh day it is a holy convocation… all work should not be done on them.” This parallels Genesis 2:1-4. The seventh day is holy, for God finished his work.13:6-7 – “Seven days you will eat unleavened bread (מצת) and on the seventh day it is a feast for YHWH; unleavened bread will be eaten (יאכל) for seven days, and leaven will not be seen for you for seven days.” This parallels with Genesis 1-3: There is a certain food provided (מן כל העך), and a certain food that is forbidden (the tree of knowing good and bad).Here's a quote Tim cites in his notes for this verse: “But why require eating unleavened bread as the special focus of the exodus memorial meal, the Passover? The answer is that unleavened bread was the unique food of the original exodus, the event God wanted his people to be sure not to forget. People everywhere normally eat leavened bread. It tastes better, is more pleasant to eat, is more filling. Leavened bread was the normal choice of the Israelites in Egypt too. But on the night they ran, there was no time for the usual niceties—a fast meal had to be eaten, and hastily made bread had to be consumed. The fact that a lamb or goat kid was roasted for the meat portion of the meal or that bitter herbs were eaten as a side dish was not nearly so special or unusual as the fact that the bread was unleavened, thus essentially forming sheets of cracker. Eating it at the memorial feast intentionally recalled the original departure in haste. Eating it for a solid week tended to fix the idea in one’s consciousness.” (Douglas K. Stuart, Exodus, vol. 2, The New American Commentary, 283)Consider these points:Passover is coordinated with the “wonder” of the parting of the waters and deliverance onto dry land (Exod 14), which parallels Genesis 1 when God parts the waters so that dry land can emerge.Passover is about Israel’s liberation from “slavery” (עבדה/עב׳׳ד), which parallels Genesis 1-2 about the creation of humanity as God’s co-rulers who “work” (עב׳׳ד) the land.Passover is a reversal of humanity’s exile when Israel is “banished” (גרשו, Ex 12:39) from Egypt, which parallels Genesis 3:22-24 when humanity is banished from Eden into the wilderness.Tim concludes by saying that Passover and the Exodus are a kind of “new creation” as enslaved humanity is liberated from the realm of exile, death, and darkness and led through the waters of death into the new Eden of the promised land, marked by the celebration of a seven-day ritual (in the month of Abib on the 14th-21st). The liberation brought about at Passover is a new creation. The liberation requires that humans not try to provide their own security or provision (bread) but eat only what God allows and provides. This is clearly in preparation for the manna.Thank you to all our supporters!Have a question? Record your question and send it to [email protected]. Tell us your name and where you’re from. And try to keep the question under 20-30 seconds. Thanks!Show MusicDefender Instrumental by TentsWhere Peace and Rest are Found by Beautiful EulogyAll Night by Unwritten StoriesMoon by LeMMinoSupporter Synth GrooveThe Pilgrim by GreyfloodShow Resources:Judith Hertog, “Prisoner Of Hope: Cornel West’s Quest For Justice”Richard H. Lowery, Sabbath and JubileeDouglas K. Stuart, Exodus, vol. 2, The New American CommentaryShow Produced by: Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast.
11/4/20191 hour, 7 minutes, 26 seconds
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Two Kinds of Work - 7th Day Rest E3

QUOTE“So once [the fall] happened, we go to Genesis 3, and all of a sudden the ground that was the source of humanity’s life as a gift from God—‘cursed is the ground because of you.’ So all of a sudden, we’ve lost the seventh-day ideal and not attained it.”KEY TAKEAWAYSAfter the fall, there was a change in the fundamental nature of humanity’s work. Before the fall, it was enjoyable by default. After the fall, work becomes a task done for survival.God calls Abraham in Genesis 12 with a seven line poem. This is a symbolic use of the number seven and meant to tie in with the Genesis creation narrative.In Genesis 2:15 a keyword is introduced to the story. That word is nuakh, “rested him” (וינחהו / nuakh) and it is meant to portray an act of full abiding residence. Humanity was meant to be fully present and abide in the garden that God created.SHOW NOTESWelcome to episode three in our series on the theme of the seventh-day rest in the Bible.In part 1 (0-21:45), Tim comments on Genesis 2:15.Genesis 2:15Then the Lord God took the human and ‘rested him’ (וינחהו / nuakh) into the garden of Eden to work it and keep it.God “rests” the human in the garden so that he can “work” it. Tim notes that this is the first appearance of the Hebrew word nuakh in the Bible. This becomes an important word in the theme of seventh-day rest. Tim says that this word can be understood as “to dwell,” or “to abide and rest in.” Humanity is to be fully present in the garden (Heb. nuakh = “to take up residence”).Tim also says that this abiding rest is conditional. Will humans obey God and not take of the tree of the knowledge of good and bad? Answer: no. So what happens? Humanity rebels and is exiled from the heaven and earth Eden mountain, sent to “work/labor” the ground.Genesis 3:17-19Cursed is the ground because of you;through painful toil you will eat food from itall the days of your life.It will produce thorns and thistles for you,and you will eat the plants of the field.By the sweat of your browyou will eat your fooduntil you return to the ground,since from it you were taken;for dust you areand to dust you will return.Tim says that this is a change in the nature of our work. The work is no longer enjoyable by default; instead, work becomes a task done for survival.In part 2 (21:45-33:20), Jon asks how this idea fits with God’s call for humanity to tend and maintain the garden. Wouldn’t ruling and subduing creation take work?Tim responds by talking about two different types of work. Humanity was created to work, but the original work they were destined for was fundamentally different from the post-fall, post-eden work. Tim quotes from Abraham Joshua Heschel, a famous 20th century Jewish rabbi and his book The Sabbath.“We are all infatuated with the splendor of space and the grandeur of the things of space. Thing is a category that lays heavy on our mind, tyrannizing all our thoughts. In our daily lives we attend primarily to that which are senses are spelling out for us. Reality to us is thinghood, consisting of substances that occupy space. Even God is perceived by most of us as a thing. The result of our thinginess is a blindness to all realities that fail to identify itself as a thing. This is obvious in our understanding of time, which being thingless and unsubstantial appears to us as having no reality. Indeed we know what to do with space but do not know what to do with time, except to make it subservient to space. Most of us seem to labor for the sake of things of space. As a result we suffer from a deeply rooted dread of time and stand aghast when compelled to look into its face. Time to us is sarcasm. A slick treacherous monster with a jaw like a furnace incinerating every moment of our lives. Shrinking therefore from facing time, we escape for shelter to things of space.” (Abraham Joshua Heschel, The Sabbath, prologue)In part 3 (33:20-40:45), Tim focuses on Psalm 90.Lord, you have been our dwelling placein all generations.Before the mountains were brought forth,or ever you had formed the earth and the world,from everlasting to everlasting you are God.You return man to dustand say, “Return, O children of man!”For a thousand years in your sightare but as yesterday when it is past,or as a watch in the night.You sweep them away as with a flood; they are like a dream,like grass that is renewed in the morning:in the morning it flourishes and is renewed;in the evening it fades and withers.For we are brought to an end by your anger;by your wrath we are dismayed.You have set our iniquities before you,our secret sins in the light of your presence.For all our days pass away under your wrath;we bring our years to an end like a sigh.The years of our life are seventy,or even by reason of strength eighty;yet their span is but toil and trouble;they are soon gone, and we fly away.Who considers the power of your anger,and your wrath according to the fear of you?So teach us to number our daysthat we may get a heart of wisdom.Return, O Lord! How long?Have pity on your servants!Satisfy us in the morning with your steadfast love,that we may rejoice and be glad all our days.Make us glad for as many days as you have afflicted us,and for as many years as we have seen evil.Let your work be shown to your servants,and your glorious power to their children.Let the favor of the Lord our God be upon us,and establish the work of our hands upon us;yes, establish the work of our hands!Tim notes that in verse 14, the English word “satisfy” is the Hebrew word for seven. So the writer is asking God for a completeness that only he can give.In part 4 (40:45-49:30), Tim looks at the calling of Abraham in Genesis 12. Tim says that this is a seven-lined poem, and there are five promises of blessing which match the five curses earlier in Genesis 3-11. Jon notes that the conversation is actually looking at new creation through the lens of the sabbath and seventh-day rest.In part 5 (49:30-55:45), Tim dives into a story about Abraham in Genesis 21.Genesis 21:22-34Now it came about at that time that Abimelech and Phicol, the commander of his army, spoke to Abraham, saying, “God is with you in all that you do; now therefore, swear to me here by God that you will not deal falsely with me or with my offspring or with my posterity, but according to the kindness that I have shown to you, you shall show to me and to the land in which you have sojourned.” Abraham said, “I swear it.”But Abraham complained to Abimelech because of the well of water which the servants of Abimelech had seized. And Abimelech said, “I do not know who has done this thing; you did not tell me, nor did I hear of it until today.” Abraham took sheep and oxen and gave them to Abimelech, and the two of them made a covenant. Then Abraham set seven ewe lambs of the flock by themselves. Abimelech said to Abraham, “What do these seven ewe lambs mean, which you have set by themselves?” He said, “You shall take these seven ewe lambs from my hand so that it may be a witness to me, that I dug this well.” Therefore he called that place Beersheba, because there the two of them took an oath. So they made a covenant at Beersheba; and Abimelech and Phicol, the commander of his army, arose and returned to the land of the Philistines. Abraham planted a tamarisk tree at Beersheba, and there he called on the name of the Lord, the Everlasting God. And Abraham sojourned in the land of the Philistines for many days.Tim notes that this story is symbolic on many levels. Tim notes that the Hebrew word sheba can be translated as both “seven” and “oath.” So the story represents Abraham making a “seven” oath with Abimelech, who symbolically represents the nations. This oath results in peace and abundance for all people involved. Tim and Jon both agree that once you start to look for it, the themes of seven, completeness, and seventh-day rest are all over the Bible.In part 6 (44:45-end), Tim and Jon recap the episode and preview the next part of the story, which is Israel’s enslavement in Egypt and the Exodus story.Show Music:Defender Instrumental by TentsOcean by KVBlue VHS by Lofi Type BeatLevitating by InventionMind Your Time by Me.SoThe Truth About Flight, Love and BB Guns by ForeknownShow Produced by:Dan GummelShow Resources:Abraham Joshua Heschel, The SabbathPowered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/28/20191 hour, 58 seconds
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The Significance of 7 - 7th Day Rest E2

QUOTE“Genesis 1 isn’t just telling you about what type of world you’re living in; it’s showing you, as a Israelite reader, that your life of worship rhythms are woven into the fabric of the universe.”KEY TAKEAWAYSThe idea of resting and the number seven are intimately connected in the Bible.In Genesis 1, the word or number "seven" has two key symbolic meanings: seven represents a full and complete world, and getting to seven is a linear journey from one to seven.The rhythm of practicing sabbath or resting every seventh day is one way that humans can imitate God and act like they are participating in the new creation.SHOW NOTESWelcome to our second episode tracing the theme of seventh-day rest in the Bible!In part 1 (0-18:30), Tim shares some of the numeric symbolism in Genesis 1. The opening line of Genesis 1 has seven words, and the central word, untranslated in English, is two Hebrew letters, the first and last letters of the Hebrew alphabet: aleph and taw.When one isolates the theme of time in Genesis 1, another design pattern emerges that provides a foundation for all of Israel’s rituals of sacred time.Tim points out that there are many other ways the number seven is symbolic in the Genesis narrative: there are seven words in Genesis 1:1, and fourteen words in Genesis 1:2. There are seven paragraphs in Genesis 1:1-2:3 marked by “evening and morning.” The concluding seventh paragraph in Genesis 2:1-3 begins three lines which have seven words each (Gen 2:2-3a).In part 2 (18:30-28:30), Tim summarizes a series of details about the literary design of Genesis ch. 1 from Umberto Cassuto's commentary on Genesis:"In view of the importance ascribed to the number seven generally, and particularly in the story of Creation, this number occurs again and again in the structure of our section. The following details are deserving of note:(a). After the introductory verse (1:1), the section is divided into seven paragraphs, each of which appertains to one of the seven days. An obvious indication of this division is to be seen in the recurring sentence, And there was evening and there was morning, such-and-such a day. Hence the Masoretes were right in placing an open paragraph [i.e. one that begins on a new line] after each of these verses. Other ways of dividing the section suggested by some modern scholars are unsatisfactory.(b–d). Each of the three nouns that occur in the first verse and express the basic concepts of the section, viz God [אֱלֹהִים ʾElōhīm] heavens [שָׁמַיִם šāmayim], earth [אֶרֶץ ʾereṣ], are repeated in the section a given number of times that is a multiple of seven: thus the name of God occurs thirty-five times, that is, five times seven (on the fact that the Divine Name, in one of its forms, occurs seventy times in the first four chapters, see below); earth is found twenty-one times, that is, three times seven; similarly heavens (or firmament, רָקִיעַ rāqīaʿ) appears twenty-one times.(e). The ten sayings with which, according to the Talmud, the world was created (Aboth v 1; in B. Rosh Hashana 32a and B. Megilla 21b only nine of them are enumerated, the one in 1:29, apparently, being omitted)—that is, the ten utterances of God beginning with the words, and … said—are clearly divisible into two groups: the first group contains seven Divine fiats enjoining the creation of the creatures, to wit, ‛Let there be light’, ‘Let there be a firmament’, ‘Let the waters be gathered together’, ‘Let the earth put forth vegetation’, ‘Let there be lights’, ‘Let the waters bring forth swarms’, ‘Let the earth bring forth’; the second group comprises three pronouncements that emphasize God’s concern for man’s welfare (three being the number of emphasis), namely, ‘Let us make man’ (not a command but an expression of the will to create man), ‘Be fruitful and multiply’, ‘Behold I have given unto you every plant yielding seed’. Thus we have here, too, a series of seven corresponding dicta.(f). The terms light and day are found, in all, seven times in the first paragraph, and there are seven references to light in the fourth paragraph.(g). Water is mentioned seven times in the course of paragraphs two and three.(h). In the fifth and sixth paragraphs forms of the word חַיָּה ḥayyā [rendered ‘living’ or ‘beasts’] occur seven times.(i). The expression it was good appears seven times (the seventh time—very good).(j). The first verse has seven words.(k). The second verse contains fourteen words—twice seven.(l). In the seventh paragraph, which deals with the seventh day, there occur the following three consecutive sentences (three for emphasis), each of which consists of seven words and contains in the middle the expression the seventh day:And on the seventh day God finished His work which He had done, and He rested on the seventh day from all His work whichHe had done.So God blessed the seventh day and hallowed it.(m). The words in the seventh paragraph total thirty-five—five times seven.To suppose that all this is a mere coincidence is not possible.§ 6. This numerical symmetry is, as it were, the golden thread that binds together all the parts of the section and serves as a convincing proof of its unity against the view of those—and they comprise the majority of modern commentators—who consider that our section is not a unity but was formed by the fusion of two different accounts, or as the result of the adaptation and elaboration of a shorter earlier version."U. Cassuto, A Commentary on the Book of Genesis: Part I, From Adam to Noah (Genesis I–VI 8), trans. Israel Abrahams (Jerusalem: The Magnes Press, The Hebrew University, 1998), pages 13–15.Tim says all of this numerical symbolism is completely intentional. The authors want us to learn that seven represents both a whole completed creation and a journey to that completeness.In part 3 (28:30-41:00), Jon asks why the number seven became so symbolic in ancient Hebrew culture. Tim says the origins of the number seven being associated with completeness is likely tied to the lunar calendar of moon cycles. The biblical Hebrew word for “month” is “moon” (חדש). Each month consisted of 29.5 days, and each month consisted of four 7.3-day cycles, making a “complete” cycle of time. However, the sabbath cycle is independent of the moon cycle, and sabbaths do not coincide with the new moon. It is patterned after creation, and stands outside of any natural cycle of time.Tim then makes an important note on Hebrew word play. Seven was symbolic in ancient near eastern and Israelite culture and literature. It communicated a sense of “fullness” or “completeness” (שבע “seven” is spelled with the same consonants as the word שבע “complete/full”). This makes sense of the pervasive appearance of “seven” patterns in the Bible. For more information on this, Tim cites Maurice H. Farbridge’s book, Studies in Biblical and Semitic Symbolism, 134-37.In part 4 (41:00-52:30), Jon asks what it means for God to rest?In response, Tim says there are two separate but related Hebrew concepts and words for rest.The Hebrew word shabat means “to cease from.” God ceases from his work because “it is finished” (Gen 2:1). Compare with Joshua 5:12, “The manna ceased (shabat) on that day….”The Hebrew word nuakh means “to take up residence.” Compare with Exodus 10:14, “The locusts came up over the land of Egypt and rested (nuakh) in all the land.” When God or people nuakh, it always involves settling into a place that is safe, secure, and stable. 2 Samuel 7:1 says, “Now when King David dwelt in his house, for Yahweh had provided rest from his enemies….”The drama of the story, Tim notes, is the question as to whether humans and God will nuakh together? All of this sets a foundation for later biblical stories of Israel entering in the Promised Land, a land of rest.In part 5 (52:30-end), Tim asks what it means that God blessed the seventh day?Tim cites scholar Mathilde Frey:“Set apart from all other days, the blessing of the seventh day establishes the seventh part of created time as a day when God grants his presence in the created world. It is then his presence that provides the blessing and the sanctification. The seventh day is blessed and established as the part of time that assures fruitfulness, future-orientation, continuity, and permanence for every aspect of life within the dimension of time. The seventh day is blessed by God’s presence for the sake of the created world, for all nature, and for all living beings.” (Mathilde Frey, The Sabbath in the Pentateuch, 45)Tim says in Genesis 1, the symbolism of seven is a view that the “seventh day” is the culmination of all history. Tim cites scholar Samuel H. Balentine.“Unlike the previous days, the seventh day is simply announced. There is no mention of evening or morning, no mention of a beginning or ending. The suggestion is that the primordial seventh day exists in perpetuity, a sacred day that cannot be abrogated by the limitations common to the rest of the created order.” (Samuel H. Balentine, The Torah’s Vision of Worship, 93)Tim also cites scholar Robert Lowry: “The seventh-day account does not end with the expected formula, “there was evening and morning,” that concluded days one through six. Breaking the pattern in this way emphasizes the uniqueness of the seventh day and opens the door to an eschatological interpretation. Literarily, the sun has not yet set on God’s Sabbath.” (Richard H. Lowery, Sabbath and Jubilee, 90)Show Music:Defender Instrumental by TentsOptimistic by Lo Fi Type BeatKame House by Lofi Hip Hop InstrumentalIt’s Ok to Not Be Ok by Highkey BeatsHometown by nymano x PandressResources:Maurice H. Farbridge, Studies in Biblical and Semitic SymbolismUmberto Cassuto, From Adam to Noah: A Commentary on the Book of GenesisMathilde Frey, The Sabbath in the PentateuchSamuel H. Balentine, The Torah’s Vision of WorshipRichard H. Lowery, Sabbath and JubileeShow Produced By:Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/21/20191 hour, 5 minutes, 9 seconds
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The Restless Craving for Rest - 7th Day Rest E1

SHOW DESCRIPTIONThe sabbath. Talking about it can be complicated and confusing, yet the biblical authors wrote about it a lot. So what’s it all about? The sabbath is more than an antiquated law. It’s about the design of time and the human quest for rest. The sabbath and seventh-day rest is one of the key themes that starts on page one of the Bible and weaves beautifully all the way through to the end.FAVORITE QUOTE“The seventh day is like a multifaceted gem. One of the main facets is the fabric of creation as leading toward a great goal where humans imitate God and join him in ceasing from work and labor. But there’s going to be another facet that’s all about being a slave to our labor. And so the seventh day is a time to celebrate our liberation from slavery so that we can rest with God.”KEY TAKEAWAYSThe theme of the sabbath or seventh-day rest is a key theme in the Bible that starts on page one and goes all the way through to the end.The word sabbath comes from the Hebrew word shabot, which means most simply “to stop” or “to cease from.”Keeping/observing/remembering the sabbath is one of the Ten Commandments. It sticks out as being a uniquely Jewish practice at the time in history when the commandments were given.SHOW NOTESWelcome to the first episode in our series on understanding seventh-day rest in the Bible!In part 1 (0-6:35), Tim outlines the theme in general. He says the seventh-day rest is actually a huge theme in the Bible, even more prominent in the Scriptures than other TBP videos. Tim calls it an “organizing main theme in the Bible.”In part 2 (6:35-23:45), Tim recounts a story from when he and Jon visited Jerusalem. They were both able to share a Sabbath meal with practicing Jews in Jerusalem. Tim shares that the Sabbath tradition is one of the longest running traditions in any culture in the world. Even the word shabat’s most basic meaning is “to stop.”In part 3 (23:45-33:00), Tim says this series isn’t really going to be about the practice of sabbath but about the theme and symbolism of sabbath and seventh-day rest in the Bible. This theme is rich and complex, woven from start to finish in the Scriptures. The practice of the Sabbath itself is only one piece of the underlying message the authors are trying to communicate.In part 4 (33:00-45:30), Tim and Jon discuss “keeping, observing, or remembering” the sabbath in the Ten Commandments. This command sticks out as a unique Jewish practice. The Jews are told to keep the sabbath for two different reasons according to two different passages:Exodus 20:8-11Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a sabbath of the Lord your God; in it you shall not do any work, you or your son or your daughter, your male or your female servant or your cattle or your sojourner who stays with you. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea and all that is in them, and rested (Heb. shabat) on the seventh day; therefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day and made it holy.Deuteronomy 5:12-15Keep the sabbath day to keep it holy, as the Lord your God commanded you. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a sabbath of the Lord your God; in it you shall not do any work, you or your son or your daughter or your male servant or your female servant or your ox or your donkey or any of your cattle or your sojourner who stays with you, so that your male servant and your female servant may rest (Heb. nuakh) as well as you. You shall remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt, and the Lord your God brought you out of there by a mighty hand and by an outstretched arm; therefore the Lord your God commanded you to observe the sabbath day.Tim notes that in the first passage, Jews are told to keep the sabbath because it is an act of participation in God’s presence and rule over creation. But in the second passage, keeping the sabbath is an act of implementing God’s presence and rule by the liberation from slavery. Tim says these two ways of viewing the practice of the sabbath are two of the core ways to think about the seventh-day rest theme in the bible.In part 5 (45:30-end), Tim cites scholar Matitiahu Tsevat about the biblical phrase “it is a sabbath of Yahweh” (שבת ליהוה), literally, “a sabbath that belongs to Yahweh.”“This phrase is so important, it’s easy to miss its centrality... Just as in the 7th year of release man desists from utilizing the land for his own business and benefit, so on the sabbath day he desists from using that day for his own affairs. And just äs the intervals in regard to the release year and the jubilee years are determined by the number seven, so too is the number seven determinative for that recurring day when man refrains from his own pursuits and sets it aside for God. In regular succession he breaks the natural flow of time, proclaiming, and that the break is made for the sake of the Lord. This meaning which we have ascertained from the laws finds support Isaiah 58: “If you restrain your foot on the sabbath so äs not to pursue your own affairs on My holy day…” Man normally is master of his time. He is free to dispose of it as he sees fit or as necessity bids him. The Israelite is duty-bound, however, once every seven days to assert by word and deed that God is the master of time. … one day out of seven the Israelite is to renounce dominion over his own time and recognize God's dominion over it. Simply: Every seventh day the Israelite renounces his autonomy and affirms God's dominion over him in the conclusion that every seventh day the Israelite is to renounce dominion over time, thereby renounce autonomy, and recognize God's dominion over time and thus over himself. Keeping the sabbath is acceptance of the kingdom and sovereignty of God.” (Matitiahu Tsevat, The Basic Meaning of the Biblical Sabbath, 453-455.)Tim says the structure of the sabbath is meant to be inconvenient. God is the master of all time, and he holds all the time that we think actually belongs to us.Show Music:Defender Instrumental by TentsRoyalty Free Middle Eastern MusicShabot Songs:Psalm 121 (Lai Lai Lai) by Joshua AaronL'maancha by Eitan KatzResources:http://joshua-aaron.com/http://www.eitankatz.com/Matitiahu Tsevat, The Basic Meaning of the Biblical SabbathShow Produced by:Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast
10/14/201956 minutes, 37 seconds
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Can I Get a Witness?

The word witness is a key word in the bible, and the theme of “witnessing” is a key theme in the bible that can be used to understand the whole story of the bible.Key TakeawaysThe word witness is a key word in the bible, and the theme of “witnessing” is a key theme in the bible that can be used to understand the whole story of the bible.The greek word μάρτυς (mártus) is used in the New Testament as the word for “witness” it is also the root word for ”martyr:”The word witness is used in a variety of different ways throughout the Bible. For example, God is described as being a witness. Israel is called to be a witness to the nations and Jesus says he is a witness about himself.Favorite Quotes“It’s weird how simple and how big of a responsibility being a witness is. God wants a group of witnesses who experience him and then talk about it.”Show NotesIn part 1, (0-7:45) Tim and Jon introduce the topic and also introduce Carissa Quinn a biblical scholar on staff with the bible project. Carisa is responsible for researching and writing the script for the upcoming video on witness. The group talks about the popular usages of the word witness. Jon toes that in a Christian context, “witness” is often meant to be an activity that someone will do to try and logically convince or debate somebody (a non believer) about Jesus and the truth of the bible.The group also notes that oftentimes ‘witness’ is best understood in a modern legal context.In part 2, (7:45-16:50) Carissa says the word witness occurs over 400 hundred times in the bible in a variety of forms. In hebrew the word ‘witness’ is basically (1) someone who sees something amazing or important--in Hebrew, this person is an עֵד (eid) and in Greek, a μάρτυς (mártus). And (2) if this person begins to share what they’ve seen, we call this ‘bearing witness’: in Hebrew עוּד (uwd) and in Greek μαρτυρέω (marturéo).Carissa shares the story of Ruth in Ruth 4:9, when Boaz buys land from Naomi’s family, he calls together witnesses to see the transaction, so that if there’s a later dispute about the land, they can bear witness about what they saw. Tim notes that this passage is somewhat related to Deut 25:9 a law about sandals and witnessing being used as a form of legal documentation.The group briefly discusses the role of a public notary in modern culture. They act as official witnesses to legal signings.In part 3, (16:50-24:50) Carissa goes to Psalm 27 and the theme of “false witnesses”. Carissa notes that God is referred to as a witness throughout the bible. For example in Genesis 31:49 ... “May the Lord watch between you and me when we are absent one from the other. 50 If you mistreat my daughters, or if you take wives besides my daughters, although no man is with us, see, God is witness between you and me.”In the New Testament God the Father is said to bear witness to the identity of Jesus. Jesus also says he bears witness to himself in John 8:17-18 “In your Law it is written that the testimony of two people is true. 18 I am the one who bears witness about myself, and the Father who sent me bears witness about me.”Carissa then notes that many times Paul uses a phrase like “God is my witness” for example in Romans 1:9 “For God is my witness, whom I serve with my spirit in the gospel of his Son, that without ceasing I mention you 10 always in my prayers, asking that somehow by God's will I may now at last succeed in coming to you.”In part 4 (24:50-42:45)Carissa continues the conversation by bringing up the fact that an object can be a witness in the bible. For example in Joshua 24: 27 And Joshua said to all the people, “Behold, this stone shall be a witness against us, for it has heard all the words of the Lord that he spoke to us. Therefore it shall be a witness against you, lest you deal falsely with your God.”Carissa then notes that the word “witness” in the bible can be used to trace the whole story of the bible. Tim says that the word “witness” is an interesting way to think about the image of god. People are created in God’s image to “witness” god and his creation to the rest of the world.Carissa says that israel is called to be a witness to the other nations in Exodus 19:4-6 “ ‘You yourselves have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles' wings and brought you to myself. 5 Now therefore, if you will indeed obey my voice and keep my covenant, you shall be my treasured possession among all peoples, for all the earth is mine; 6 and you shall be to me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation.”Carissa says that later in the bible the torah is referred to as a “witness” and is often called “the laws of the testimony”. Meaning the laws are testifying or witnessing the relationship between god and israel. Additionally, Moses writes a song in Deuteronomy 32 to bear witness to Israel about God.Carissa points out that in John 5, Jesus says the Torah points to him in John 5:39 “You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me.”In part 5 (42:45-49:20)Carissa notes the theme of the word witness in the prophets. For example 2 Chronicles 24:19 "Yet he sent prophets among them to bring them back to the Lord. These testified (witnessed) against them, but they would not pay attention.Carissa notes that to testify against or to witness against was one of the primary roles of prophets in the Old Testament. They were warning/ witnessing to Israel about what would happen to them if they didn’t follow god.Carissa also notes that Isiah 43:10-12 is a crucial passage to understand the role that the whole nation of Israel was to have in acting as God's witnesses.Isaiah 42:10 ““You are my witnesses,” declares the Lord, and my servant whom I have chosen,that you may know and believe meand understand that I am he.Before me no god was formed,nor shall there be any after me.11I, I am the Lord,and besides me there is no savior.12I declared and saved and proclaimed,when there was no strange god among you;and you are my witnesses,” declares the Lord, “and I am God.In the last part, (49:20-end)Carissa talks about Jesus. Jesus claims to be the “chief witness” from Isaiah 61. He was sent to open the eyes of Israel who are the blind witnesses to God and his creation. Tim notes how ironic it is that Jesus is the ultimate witness bearing witness to God's kingdom that gets him killed. Carissa note that the word “μάρτυς (mártus).” is the greek word for witness which is also the root word for martyr. So Jesus was a martus, and a martyr by staking his life on what he believes in.In Acts followers of Jesus are called to be “witnesses”. But often times in the New Testament being a witness is directly connected to verifying or believing in the resurrection of Jesus from the dead.Jon notes that witness in modern context is usually more about debating ore rationalizing Jesus and Christianity to a secular world. Carissa notes that to “bear witness” is a sign of someone's character. Jon then notes that thinking about being a witness in life is actually a really important calling or job. A witness has an important role to play and “bearing witness” is what we are called to do as christians. Not to debate or convince people about the truth of Jesus but to share are own powerful moments of God in our lives.Show Resources:Walter Kaiser, Mission in the Old Testament: Israel as a Light to the NationsShow Music Discover by C Y G NFills the Skies: Josh WhiteBlue Skies: Unwritten StoriesAnalogs: MobyThe Truth About Flight Love and BB Guns: Beautiful EulogyShow Produced by:Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast.
10/7/20191 hour, 4 minutes, 18 seconds
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The Obvious & Extravagant Claim of the Gospel - Gospel E4

Key Takeaways:All the gospels are essentially saying the same thing. Jesus is the Jewish Messiah and his life, death, and resurrection fulfills the Hebrew Scriptures.All four gospels climax with a detailed recounting of Jesus' death and resurrection. While this may seem like an obvious point to modern readers, this is not necessarily true for ancient readers when the Scriptures were formed.Modern readers of the gospels should make an effort to familiarize themselves with how ancient Greco-Roman biography and literature worked. The four gospels are not modern texts; therefore, readers should be sympathetic and strive to view them not through a modern lens, but in light of their historic context.Quotes: “The main mode that many Christians, especially Protestants, read the Bible in is the ‘lessons for my life’ approach to the Bible. The deeply held assumption is, ‘the Bible is a moral handbook and each story is giving me a life application lesson that I can apply to my life.’ And I don’t think that’s what the Gospel authors are trying to do.”"(The gospels are) tying in Jesus’ story as the fulfillment of the Hebrew Scripture storyline which is the story of Israel and all humanity. And then all of them are saying the story leads up to the moment of a Jewish wonder-worker’s execution. It’s a simple point. But that is their main point."In part 1 (0-11:30), Tim and Jon briefly recap the series so far. They discuss the earlier tips for reading the gospels more effectively and deeply. Tim says readers should always remember that the gospels are meant to be stories about Jesus, but they have been specifically selected to be persuasive stories about Jesus. The Gospel authors want the reader to believe that Jesus is the Messiah. Sometimes they make this intent obvious and explicit, but other times, they make the claims indirectly. Tim says this method of indirect communication and indirect claims about Jesus is the primary way that Gospel authors design their portraits of Jesus.In part 2 (11:30-22:00), Tim notes that many of the stories about Jesus, including the stories of miracles, sound unbelievable to many modern Western audiences. Whereas in other cultures, healings and miracles and those who performed them were considered an integral part of life and evidence of God or the gods’ work. Tim shares a helpful resource called The Lost Letters of Pergamum, which is a short historical novel set in ancient Roman culture during the early days of Christianity. The novel helps readers more accurately picture what the original claims of the gospel would have meant to the first followers of Christ.Tim then says most Western Protestants read these accounts through asking, “What’s the application of this gospel story to my life and how will it improve my life?” Tim says he doesn’t think this is the best way to read the gospels. Instead, readers should learn to read the gospels as intricate and complete portraits of Jesus Christ of Nazareth that are claiming that Jesus is the promised Jewish Messiah.In part 3 (22:00-32:00), Tim notes that every Gospel climaxes with Jesus’ death and resurrection. Tim then contrasts this with the Gospel of Thomas, which does not include Jesus’ death and resurrection narrative. To the gnostics who used the Gospel of Thomas, Jesus was a wise, divine teacher who dispensed knowledge to humanity to help them learn to be wise.Tim then says that a good example of the gospels climaxing with Jesus’ death and resurrection would be the Gospel of Mark. Most of the book highlights the final week of Jesus’ life and does a fast fly-by of Jesus’ earlier life leading up to the week of the Passover and crucifixion.Most stories, Tim observes, end with the good guy defeating the bad guy, thereby using force and violence to triumph. The Jesus story claims that Jesus triumphed by allowing himself to be killed by his enemies. He then was raised from the dead and gives his enemies an opportunity to enter into new life by believing in him.In part 5 (32:00-end), Tim and Jon discuss the differences between the gospels. Tim says that some of the variances between the stories in the gospels used to bother him. Why couldn’t all the stories be the same? Aren’t the discrepancies evidence that these stories and authors might be unreliable?However, Tim continues by sharing that over time, his perspective has changed. Now, he realizes that the Gospel authors are advancing a claim about Jesus, not recounting security camera footage of his life. The authors want the reader to understand that Jesus had a totally different way of seeing the world, so they highlight this in their own style. Tim says he would actually be highly suspicious if all the gospels’ stories are exactly identical. That would imply that the Jesus story was not authentic. It also should be taken into consideration that what many modern Christians may perceive to be untruths or discrepancies in the Bible were much more accepted by early Christians. Modern readers should attempt to understand the context and culture of how the gospels were formed instead of importing our own modern view of a biography onto an ancient text.Show Music:“Defender” instrumental by Tents“Nostalgic” by junior state“lacuna” by leavv“Beautiful Eulogy” by Beautiful EulogyShow Resources:The Lost Letters of Pergamum: A Story from the New Testament World by Bruce LongeneckerShow Produced by:Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast
9/30/201952 minutes, 16 seconds
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Why are there four accounts of the Gospel? - Gospel E3

Key takeaways:The four gospels all tell a unique perspective of the same story. They all claim Jesus is the Jewish Messiah who fulfills the Hebrew Scriptures.Mark is widely considered to be the oldest Gospel.The genealogies at the start of Matthew have hidden design patterns in them that unify the Old and New Testaments.The story of Zacharias and Elizabeth at the start of Luke is meant to layer onto the story of Abraham and Sarah in the Old Testament. This is a key design pattern of Luke. Luke likes to create the characters in his book based off Old Testament figures.Quote: “(The gospels) are constantly and from the first moment tying the Jesus story back into Hebrew scriptures. There isn’t a story or teaching about Jesus that isn’t packed with Old Testament allusion.” In part 1 (0-5:00), Tim and Jon briefly recap the last episode. Tim says he’s going to unpack four ways that readers can better understand and uncover themes in the gospels.In part 2 (5:00-14:00), Tim dives into advanced ways to read these accounts. One way to take your reading of the gospels to the next level is to get a Bible that shows when a Gospel is citing or quoting an Old Testament passage. For example, Tim focuses on the book of Mark. Most scholars view Mark as the oldest of the gospels.Mark 1 shares links to both Isaiah 40:3 and Malachi 4:5-6 in the first verses.Mark 1:1-3The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah, the Son of God, as it is written in Isaiah the prophet:“I will send my messenger ahead of you,who will prepare your way”—“a voice of one calling in the wilderness,‘Prepare the way for the Lord,make straight paths for him.’”Tim says that this should alert the reader to the fact that Mark is heavily influenced by the Old Testament. Mark is reading the Old Testament, and his Gospel is structured around and informed by the Hebrew Scriptures.In part 3 (14:00-22:30), Tim then looks at the start of Matthew. The book begins with a genealogy. This genealogy is broken into three movements of fourteen generations: fourteen from Abraham to David, fourteen from David to the exile, and fourteen from the exile to Jesus.In order to stick to this pattern, Tim notes, generations would have been left out. So why would Matthew use this pattern?There are several thoughts. One is that the number fourteen is the numerical value of the name “David.” So Matthew is disguising his claim that Jesus is a new and better David in this genealogy.Tim also mentions that four women are mentioned in this genealogy. Each of them are non-Jewish women. Again, why does Matthew do this? He wants you to know that Gentile women in the Old Testament played a crucial role in carrying on—and in some cases rescuing—the messianic seed.In part 4 (22:30-32:30), Tim dives into the opening of the Gospel of Luke. The story of Elizabeth and Zacharias is meant to map onto the story of Abraham and Sarah. Both couples are old and have no children or heirs. Luke then moves onto the introduction of Mary. Mary’s response to the angel’s proclamation is different than Zacharias’ response. So Luke uses a lot of character design to overlap Old Testament and New Testament characters in order to show a new act of God.In part 5 (32:30-47:30), Tim dives into the opening in the Gospel of John. There are themes of Genesis 1 (“In the beginning”) and Lady Wisdom from Proverbs 8 in the opening lines of John. Many modern Western readers find John's writing style to be the most approachable and easy to understand. John's links and callbacks to earlier Hebrew Scriptures are more obvious to the untrained eye than in the other gospels.In part 6 (47:30-end), Tim and Jon dive into Mathew 11.Matthew 11:2-6When John, who was in prison, heard about the deeds of the Messiah, he sent his disciples to ask him, “Are you the one who is to come, or should we expect someone else?”Jesus replied, “Go back and report to John what you hear and see: The blind receive sight, the lame walk, those who have leprosy are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, and the good news is proclaimed to the poor. Blessed is anyone who does not stumble on account of me.”Tim says that this passage is heavily influenced by Isaiah 35 because Jesus quotes from this passage to answer John's question about whether he is the Messiah or not.Isaiah 35:1-7The desert and the parched land will be glad;the wilderness will rejoice and blossom.Like the crocus, it will burst into bloom;it will rejoice greatly and shout for joy.The glory of Lebanon will be given to it,the splendor of Carmel and Sharon;they will see the glory of the Lord,the splendor of our God.Strengthen the feeble hands,steady the knees that give way;say to those with fearful hearts,“Be strong, do not fear;your God will come,he will come with vengeance;with divine retributionhe will come to save you.”Then will the eyes of the blind be openedand the ears of the deaf unstopped.Then will the lame leap like a deer,and the mute tongue shout for joy.Water will gush forth in the wildernessand streams in the desert.The burning sand will become a pool,the thirsty ground bubbling springs.In the haunts where jackals once lay,grass and reeds and papyrus will grow.Show Music:Defender Instrumental by TentsMind Your Time by Me.SoSubtle Break by Ghostrifter OfficialSerenity by JayJenAcquired in Heaven by Beautiful EulogyFor When It’s Warmer by SleepyfishEuk's First Race by David GummelShow Resources:What Are the Gospels?: A Comparison with Graeco-Roman Biography by Richard BurridgeReading the Gospels Wisely: A Narrative and Theological Introduction by Jonathan PenningtonA brief overview of Jewish history pre-Christ and during Roman rule.For more on the different scholarly views on the meaning and background of Lady Wisdom in Israelite history, see Michael Fox's Anchor Bible Commentary: Proverbs 1-9 on pages 331-345 and 352-359.Show Produced by:Dan GummelPowered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/23/20191 hour, 8 minutes, 44 seconds
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The Gospel is More Than You Think - Gospel E2

In part 1 (0-19:00), Tim and Jon give a brief historical overview of Israel at the time Jesus was born. Israel had been under hundreds of years of military occupation by different empires. At the time of Jesus, that empire is Rome. Tim notes that the entire Jewish people would have had a sense of expectation. The Hebrew Scriptures taught them that the glory of the Jewish kingdom would return and a messiah would rescue them. This mindset—though difficult for us to imagine—was that of an ancient Jew under Roman rule at the time when the gospels were written.In part 2 (19:00-25:00), Tim notes that for one to declare or be declared as “messiah” while under Roman rule would have been viewed as an act of politcal insurrrection and revolution.In part 3 (25:00-38:45), Tim outlines the history of the word gospel, which comes from the old English word “godspel” or *good tidings*. This word in Greek is εὐαγγέλιον and Tim notes that “the euangelion” is what Jesus is said to proclaim in the beginning of Mark. Mark 1:1 *The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah, the Son of God.* Tim then notes how Paul uses the same word at the start of Romans. Romans 1:2-4 *the gospel he promised beforehand through his prophets in the Holy Scriptures regarding his Son, who as to his earthly life was a descendant of David, and who through the Spirit of holiness was appointed the Son of God in power by his resurrection from the dead: Jesus Christ our Lord.* Tim also shared 1 Corinthians 15:1-8. *Now, brothers and sisters, I want to remind you of the gospel I preached to you, which you received and on which you have taken your stand. By this gospel you are saved, if you hold firmly to the word I preached to you. Otherwise, you have believed in vain. For what I received I passed on to you as of first importance: that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day according to the Scriptures, and that he appeared to Cephas,and then to the Twelve. After that, he appeared to more than five hundred of the brothers and sisters at the same time, most of whom are still living, though some have fallen asleep. Then he appeared to James, then to all the apostles, and last of all he appeared to me also, as to one abnormally born.* Tim notes that Paul doesn’t have a stock phrase or answer for “what is the gospel.” Instead he tweaks the message in both of these books and offers two complimentary answers. This example from Paul should make us cautious of trying to boil down the gospel to a simple formula. If Paul didn’t really do it that way, why should we? Instead we should try to learn how to articulate the whole story of the Jewish Scriptures and distill the gospel through that lens.In part 4 (38:45-44:45), Tim also brings up Paul’s speech to the Athenians in Acts 17: Acts 17:22-34 *Paul then stood up in the meeting of the Areopagus and said: “People of Athens! I see that in every way you are very religious. For as I walked around and looked carefully at your objects of worship, I even found an altar with this inscription: to an unknown god. So you are ignorant of the very thing you worship—and this is what I am going to proclaim to you.* *“The God who made the world and everything in it is the Lord of heaven and earth and does not live in temples built by human hands. And he is not served by human hands, as if he needed anything. Rather, he himself gives everyone life and breath and everything else. From one man he made all the nations, that they should inhabit the whole earth; and he marked out their appointed times in history and the boundaries of their lands. God did this so that they would seek him and perhaps reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from any one of us. ‘For in him we live and move and have our being.’ As some of your own poets have said, ‘We are his offspring.’* *“Therefore since we are God’s offspring, we should not think that the divine being is like gold or silver or stone—an image made by human design and skill. In the past God overlooked such ignorance, but now he commands all people everywhere to repent. For he has set a day when he will judge the world with justice by the man he has appointed. He has given proof of this to everyone by raising him from the dead.”* *When they heard about the resurrection of the dead, some of them sneered, but others said, “We want to hear you again on this subject.” At that, Paul left the Council. Some of the people became followers of Paul and believed. Among them was Dionysius, a member of the Areopagus, also a woman named Damaris, and a number of others.* Tim notes that also in this presentation, Paul does not bring up Christ’s atoning death explictly. The atoning death of Christ is part of the gospel, but it is not the whole. The larger story of the gospel is portrayed in the four books known as the Gospels. What is the larger story? It is about Jesus inaugurating the kingdom of God.In part 5 (44:45-end), Tim gives his own definitions of the four books known as "the Gospels." "The gospels are carefully designed theological biographies of Jesus of Nazareth. They focus on his announcement of the euangelion. They are not merely historical records. They are designed to advance a claim that will challenge the readers thinking and behavior, and you are going to be forced to make a decision about Jesus after reading the book. And what is the claim? That the crucified and risen Jesus of Nazareth is the Messiah of Israel and true Lord of the world." Tim closes with an insight from scholars Loveday Alexander and Richard Burridge, as well as a book called *Reading the Gospels Wisely* by Jonathan Pennington. Show Resources:* Richard Burridge: [*What are the Gospels? A Comparison with Graeco Roman Biography*](https://amzn.to/32DhKWK).* Loveday Alexander: [*The Preface to Luke’s Gospel*](https://amzn.to/2Lz4lcI).* Jonathan Pennington: [*Reading the Gospels Wisely*](http://amzn.to/2wOuw9n).* [A brief overview of Jewish history pre-Christ and during Roman rule.](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_history#The_Hasmonean_Kingdom_(110%E2%80%9363_BCE)) Show Music:* Defender Instrumental by Tents* Hello from Portland by Beautiful Euology* For When It’s Warmer by Sleepy Fish* Instrumentals of Mercy by Beautiful Eulogy* Chilldrone: Copyright free Show Produced by: Dan Gummel Powered and distributed by Simplecast.  
9/16/201955 minutes, 8 seconds
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What Does the Word "Gospel" Mean? Feat. N.T. Wright - Gospel E1

Welcome to a special episode that kicks off our series of How to Read the Gospels. In this episode, Tim sits down with Dr. N.T. Wright to discuss the historical meaning of the word “gospel.” In part 1 (0-21:20), Dr. Wright notes that word studies are great, but it’s important to understand how words derive their meaning and live in a narrative context. Alternaitve “gospels,” including the Gospel of Thomas, typically are a collection of good advice or wise sayings from Jesus about how to live a good life, whereas the whole “gospel” or good news is the story of Jesus being crowned king and Israel being used by God to bless all the nations. Tim shares an interesting historical ancedote: a birthday announcement from a historical source called the Calendar of Priene. It’s an old royal announcement from the Roman emporer Augustus Caesar, and it uses the Greek word for “gospel,” εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, meaning "good news." "Since Providence, which has ordered all things and is deeply interested in our life, has set in most perfect order by giving us Augustus, whom she filled with virtue that he might benefit humankind, sending him as a savior, both for us and for our descendants, that he might end war and arrange all things, and since he, Caesar, by his appearance (excelled even our anticipations), surpassing all previous benefactors, and not even leaving to posterity any hope of surpassing what he has done, and since the birthday of the god Augustus was the beginning of the good tidings for the world that came by reason of him.” (The Calendar of Priene, Caesar Birthday announcement) Dr. Wright says this historical announcement reveals a very interesting historical narrative. The Roman emporers continually decreed that they had brought peace and justice to the world through violent and political power. These emporers used the same language and vocubulary as the gospel authors when they proclaim Jesus of Nazareth as the one who brings true peace and justice to the world. In part 2 (21:20-27:10), Tim and Dr. Wright discuss that “news” is an ineffective modern word to describe the gospel. A better alternative in our day would be “announcement” or “proclamation.” Today, the word “news” is used most often to describe everyday occurences, whereas the historical word εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, was far less common and treated with importance. In part 3 (27:10-42:45), Tim and Dr. Wright dive into the Gospel of Mark and Matthew. Dr. Wright focuses on the Beatitudes in Matthew. Instead of it being just an ethical to-do list, the Beatitudes are meant to model what God’s kingdom actually looks like. They represent the corporate moral ethic of God’s kingdom, showing what a world looks like when God becomes king and showing how God's kingdom spreads throughout the world. Tim and Dr. Wright both cite Isaiah 53, one of the key bridges between the Old and New Testament in the Suffering Servant. They move on to discuss a book by Dr. Richard Hayes called, “Echoes of Scripture in the Gospels” and discuss the royal enactment portrayls in the gospels. Tim and Dr. Wright note that these are very obvious themes. Jesus is given a purple robe and crowned with a crown of thorns. These themes are meant to be picked up by the reader as evidence of the upside down nature of the kingdom that Jesus was enacting. He became king through suffering. In part 4 (42:45-56:00), Tim and Dr. Wright talk about Paul and his perspective of εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion. Tim reads from Romans 1:1-6: "Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God, which he promised beforehand through his prophets in the holy Scriptures, concerning his Son, who was descended from David according to the flesh and was declared to be the Son of God in power according to the Spirit of holiness by his resurrection from the dead, Jesus Christ our Lord, through whom we have received grace and apostleship to bring about the obedience of faith for the sake of his name among all the nations, including you who are called to belong to Jesus Christ." Tim also shares 1 Corinthians 15:1-11: “Now I would remind you, brothers, of the gospel I preached to you, which you received, in which you stand, and by which you are being saved, if you hold fast to the word I preached to you—unless you believed in vain. "For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. Then he appeared to more than five hundred brothers at one time, most of whom are still alive, though some have fallen asleep. Then he appeared to James, then to all the apostles. Last of all, as to one untimely born, he appeared also to me. For I am the least of the apostles, unworthy to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. But by the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace toward me was not in vain. On the contrary, I worked harder than any of them, though it was not I, but the grace of God that is with me. Whether then it was I or they, so we preach and so you believed.” Tim thinks this 1 Corinthians passage may be over-dominant in Western Christianity’s understanding in defining the gospel. Dr. Wright notes a historical view stemming from German and Lutheran interpretation that wants to see “the gospel” only as a salvation by faith that Christ died for our sins on the cross. This view, Dr. Wright asserts, shortchanges the story of the Hebrew Scriptures. While this is part of the meaning of the word “gospel,” the whole story of the Hebrew Scriptures involves the signficance of Jesus being the new and exalted human, the new Adam, through whom humanity can now realize their orginal destiny that was laid out for them in the Garden of Eden. In part 5 (56:00-end), Tim and Dr. Wright wrap up their time together by discussing how word studies are important but need to be tied into an informed understanding of the whole narrative of the Hebrew Bible. Show Produced by: Dan Gummel Show Music: Defender Instrumental by Tents Daydreams 2 by Chillhop Fills the Skies by Josh White Yesterday on Repeat by Vexento Show Resources: The Gospel of Thomas (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Thomas) The Calendar of Priene, Caesar Birthday Announcement The Suffering Servant Umberto Cassuto, From Adam to Noah: A Commentary on the Book of Genesis I-VI Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/9/20191 hour, 11 minutes, 18 seconds
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Generosity Q&R: Overpopulation, Cain's Sacrifice & Manna Hoarding - Generosity E5

Welcome to our Q+R for our series on Generosity. Tim and Jon respond on this episode to six questions. Thank you to everyone who submitted questions! Below are the questions with corresponding timestamps. Raphael from Austria (1:36): My question is, in this modern age with trending topics like overpopulation, climate change, and running out of resources in many parts of the Earth, how can we understand or apply the mindset of abundance and that God in a generous host? Thanks for everything you do and for helping me reshape my biblical paradigms so that I may now understand the biblical story in a whole new way. Nadia from the UK (11:27): My question is with Cain and Abel: isn't it because the Lord looked on Abel's offering more favorably because he brought the best, the fattened part of his flock and the firstborn of his flock? In comparison to what Cain brought, which was just some of the fruit; it doesn’t say it was the first fruits or the best of, it was just some, and therefore, God looked more favorably on Abel’s, which is why Cain’s was rejected. Thanks! Seth from Cincinnati (12:03): You guys have discussed the reasons for why God favored Abel over Cain. The author of Hebrews says, "By faith Abel offered to God a more acceptable sacrifice than Cain, through which he was commended as righteous, God commending him by accepting his gifts. And through his faith, though he died, he still speaks" (Hebrews 11:4). ...We can infer that by contrast that Cain's must not have been offered by faith. What do you think of this interpretation? Lauren from Indiana (30:00): I love the parable you have going and that we make choices based on fear that abundance will stop, and we need to hoard. That immediately took me to Exodus 16 and the manna that Moses told them to not leave any until morning. Of course, some people did anyway, and it was spoiled. To me, that's a really obvious example of your parable, but are we supposed to be mapping that onto Genesis specifically, or was that just a happy piece of serendipity? Nathaniel from New Orleans (35:56): You've focused on how the human self-protective instinct and greed will ruin the party for everyone. But I was curious as to how natural disasters in Scripture—whether they're portrayed as a time of punishment for the wicked or time of testing of the righteous, or or both—how those interact with the image of God as generous host. Thank you very much, and God bless. Secret from Wisconsin (48:00): My question was: is there a specific context that we should have in mind when Jesus tells the Young Rich Ruler to go sell all his possessions, and give them away? Just because I know that in some cases it's not very wise to give away all you have because then you become dependent upon other people to help you, and you can't really help people yourself in the way you could if you had those resources. Thank you guys so much. Show Music: Defender Instrumental by Tents Show Produced by: Dan Gummel Show Resources: Christopher J.H. Wright, Old Testament Ethics for the People of God Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
9/2/20191 hour, 1 minute, 52 seconds
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Jesus as the Ultimate Gift - Generosity E4

In this episode, Tim and Jon discuss the story of Jesus and how it relates to the theme of generosity. In part 1 (0-16:40), Tim notes that God’s gifts to humans, and specifically his gift of the Promised Land to Israel, are unconditioned, but not unconditional. The gift of the land places an obligation upon Israel: the gift is unconditioned (unmerited), but not unconditional (non-reciprocal). It is not given to Israel based on an evaluation of their worthiness, but it is given with a clear expectation of obligated response. Then Tim dives into Matthew 5:43-48 to make the point that the fundamental depiction of God in the New Testament is that of a generous gift giver whose generosity should effect a transformation of our lives. Matthew 5:43-48
 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven; for he causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.
 For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? If you greet only your brothers, what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same?
 Therefore you are to be complete, as your heavenly Father is complete.” In part 2 (16:40-33:40), Tim dives into more passages in the New Testament that build on this theme. John 3:16 God so love the world, that he gave his one and only Son, so that whoever believes in him would not perish but have eternal life. 1 John 3:1 See how great a love the Father has given on us, that we would be called children of God; and that is what we are. 1 John 5:11
 And the testimony is this, that God has given us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. Romans 8:31-32
 What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who is against us? He who did not spare his own Son but gave him over for us all, how will he not also with him freely gift us all things? James 1:17 Every good thing given and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shifting shadow. Tim says that the generosity Jesus dispenses exposes the heart of humanity, which is bent toward selfishness. Being generous in the way that Jesus is generous creates a different kind of security than economic security. It’s a security based on a community that truly loves each other, sharing freely with each other. In part 3 (33:40-45:15), Tim dives into 2 Corinthians 8. 2 Corinthians 8:1-11 
Now, brethren, we wish to make known to you the grace of God which has been given in the churches of Macedonia, that in a great ordeal of affliction their abundance of joy and their deep poverty overflowed in the wealth of their liberality.
 For I testify that according to their ability, and beyond their ability, they gave of their own accord, begging us with much urging for the grace of participation (Greek: koinonia) in the service of the saints, and this, not as we had expected, but they first gave themselves to the Lord and to us by the will of God.
 So we urged Titus that as he had previously made a beginning, so he would also complete in you this grace as well. But just as you abound in everything, in faith and utterance and knowledge and in all earnestness and in the love we inspired in you, see that you abound in this grace also.
 I am not speaking this as a command, but as proving through the earnestness of others the sincerity of your love also.
 For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that you through his poverty might become rich.
 I give my opinion in this matter, for this is to your advantage, who were the first to begin a year ago not only to do this, but also to desire to do it.
 But now finish doing it also, so that just as there was the readiness to desire it, so there may be also the completion of it by your ability. Tim notes that the word for grace is the same word for gift in Greek (charis, noun: “grace, gift” and charizomai, verb: “to give a gift, forgive”). In part 4 (45:15-end), the guys wrap up their conversation. Tim notes that the themes of scarcity and abundance or selfishness and generosity are woven from start to finish in the Bible. Why? Because it’s a fundamental part of our human existence. Thank you to all our supporters!
 Have a question for us? Send an audio file with your question around 20 seconds to [email protected]. Check out all our resources at www.thebibleproject.com Additional Resources: Paul and the Gift by John Barclay: https://amzn.to/2Znueja Show Music:
 Defender Instrumental by Tents 
Migration by goosetaf 
Murmuration by Blue Weds (feat. Shopan) Show Produced by:
 Dan Gummel Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/26/201956 minutes, 57 seconds
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The Abraham Experiment - Generosity E3

In this episode, Tim and Jon trace this theme through the Old Testament. In part 1 (0-19:45), the guys briefly recap their discussion so far. Tim notes that Eve’s reaction in Hebrew between the birth of Cain and the birth of Seth are decidedly different. Tim says that Eve takes an arrogant stance by naming Cain, seeming to place herself alongside God. However, she takes a humble stance when she names Seth, seeing that God has granted her a son. Tim quotes scholar Umberto Cassuto: “The first woman in her joy at giving birth to her first son, boasts of her generative power, which in her estimation approximates the divine creative power. The Lord formed the first man, and I have formed the second man. Literally, ‘I have created a man with the Lord,’ by which she means, ‘I stand together equally with the Creator in the rank of creators.’” (Umberto Cassuto, Commentary on the Book of Genesis: Part I - From Adam to Noah) Tim notes that in the Bible, there are many stories of parents who abuse the gifts that God gives them in the ability to reproduce and have children, or they take undue parental pride in the gift of children. In part 2 (19:45-25:45), Tim and Jon discuss the theme of God choosing one over another. Tim points out that God’s choosing of one over another is actually a desire to bless all through the exaltation of the one. God says Cain will be exalted if he only obeys. Instead, Cain chooses to bow to his sinful desires. In part 3 (25:45-32:30), Tim moves onto the story of the Tower of Babel. Humans were called to spread out and rule the earth. Instead of embracing that gift, the humans decide to build a towering city. In part 4 (32:30-44:15), Tim dives into the story of Abraham. God chooses one family, the family of Abraham. Tim says that the Promised Land is God’s “gift” to Abraham’s family: Genesis 12:1-3
 Now the Lord said to Abram,
 “Go forth from your country, And from your family
 And from your father’s house, 
To the land which I will show you;
 And I will make you a great nation,
 And I will bless you,
 And make your name great;
 And you shall be a blessing;
 And I will bless those who bless you, 
And the one who treats you as cursed, I will curse.
 And in you all the families of the earth will be blessed.” Genesis 12:7 “To your seed I will give this land.” So he built an altar there to Yahweh who appeared to him.” Jon points out that sometimes famines come along. Sometimes, there isn’t enough. This tension does exist in the Bible, Tim notes, between God’s abundance and the existence of chaos. God didn’t create a perfectly safe world. He created a world where humans were to learn to co-rule with him, creating order from chaos. In part 5 (44:15-end), Tim notes that God keeps giving the Promised Land to Israel, and they keep misusing the gift. He cites two passages from Deuteronomy. Deuteronomy 11:8-14 “You all shall therefore keep every commandment which I am commanding you today, so that you may be strong and go in and possess the land... so that you may prolong your days on the land which the Lord swore to your fathers to give to them and to their descendants, a land flowing with milk and honey. For the land, into which you are entering to possess it, is not like the land of Egypt from which you came, where you used to sow your seed and water it with your foot like a vegetable garden. But the land into which you are about to cross to possess it, a land of hills and valleys, drinks water from the rain of heaven, a land for which the Lord your God cares; the eyes of the Lord your God are always on it, from the beginning even to the end of the year. 
“It shall come about, if you listen obediently to my commandments which I am commanding you today, to love the Lord your God and to serve him with all your heart and all your soul, that he will give the rain for your land in its season, the barley and late rain, that you may gather in your grain and your new wine and your oil.” Tim then cites scholar Joshua Berman, saying that Israel’s economy was an “Exodus-style” economy: “A key theological claim at work in these laws is that of God’s identity as the liberator of slaves. He forms a people out of those who were deemed to be people of no standing at all by the political and economic leaders who oppressed them. The egalitarian streak within Pentateuchal law codes accords with the portrayal of the Exodus as the prime experience of Israel’s self-understanding. Indeed, no Israelite can lay claim to any greater status than another, because all emanate from the Exodus—a common seminal, liberating, and equalizing event… This notion of God’s sovereignty as creator and liberator animated the biblical laws aimed at preventing Israelites from descending into the cycle of poverty and debt.” (Joshua Berman, Created Equal: How the Bible Broke with Ancient Political Thought, 88) Deuteronomy 24:19-22 “When you are harvesting in your field and you overlook a sheaf, do not go back to get it. Leave it for the immigrant, the fatherless and the widow, so that the Lord your God may bless you in all the work of your hands. When you beat the olives from your trees, do not go over the branches a second time. Leave what remains for the immigrant, the fatherless and the widow. When you harvest the grapes in your vineyard, do not go over the vines again. Leave what remains for the foreigner, the fatherless and the widow. Remember that you were slaves in Egypt. That is why I command you to do this.” Thank you to all our supporters! Have a question for us? Send an audio recording around 30 seconds to our team at [email protected]. Show Music: Defender Instrumental by Tents Quietly by blnkspc_ Mind Your Time by Me.So The Pilgrim by Greyflood Show Resources: Umberto Cassuto, Commentary on the Book of Genesis: Part I - From Adam to Noah Joshua Berman, Created Equal: How the Bible Broke with Ancient Political Thought Show Produced by: Dan Gummel Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/19/20191 hour, 4 minutes, 5 seconds
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God as the Generous Host - Generosity E2

In part 1 (0-15:00), Tim presents God as an amazing and generous host to humanity. Tim then dives into Genesis and re-examines the stories through the lens of generosity. The biblical portrait of evil, Tim shares, begins with a desire for what is not rightly mine and then taking it for oneself. Genesis 3:1-6 Now the snake was more shrewd than any beast of the field which the Lord God had made. And he said to the woman, “Indeed, has God said, ‘You shall not eat from any tree of the garden’?” The woman said to the serpent, “From the fruit of the trees of the garden we may eat; but from the fruit of the tree which is in the middle of the garden, God has said, ‘You shall not eat from it or touch it, or you will die.’ ” The serpent said to the woman, “You surely will not die! For God knows that in the day you eat from it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.” When the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was desirable for making wise, she took from its fruit and ate; and she gave also to her husband with her, and he ate. Beginning in verse 1, Tim notes, “You shall not eat from any tree of the garden” is an act of subtly undermining God’s generosity. Again this subtlety is seen in verses 4-5: “You will not die. For God knows that in the day you eat from it, your eyes will be opened and you will be like elohim, knowing good and evil.” In other words, the serpent is portraying God as holding out on humanity, withholding knowledge and good things. Finally, in verse 6, the word “desirable” (Heb. nekhmad, “the object of covetous desire”) combines with the action “take.” Humans become aware that there is something they can desire and take, presumably for their own benefit. Tim and Jon hypothesize that the tree is placed in the middle of the garden to represent that the human choice to do what is wrong is always in the center of our lives. We are always only one or two decisions away from ruining our lives and the lives of many others. In part 2 (15:00-26:45), Tim notes that humans don’t know what to do with abundance. We bend abundance to hoard and act selfishly. Tim then pivots to the story of Cain and Abel. Jon explains that he feels God is more generous with Abel than with Cain. Tim says this seems to be an intentionally ambiguous gap in the narrative. Tim says he thinks Genesis is developing a theme of the ‘mystery of election.’ God does seem to choose or favor one person over another, but that doesn’t mean it’s at the complete expense of the other person. In Genesis 4, Cain’s jealous anger at his brother compels him to take life instead of give. The narrative tells us in 4:2 that Cain was “a worker of the ground” but denies his role as a “keeper of his brother.” This is why murder is such a heinous crime in the Scriptures: to take life gratuitously is to act as if it is yours to “take,” rather than recognizing that your role as a human is to “give” life and participate in its flourishing. In part 3 (26:45-end), Tim and Jon continue to discuss the Cain and Abel story and how the traits of “taking” continues in the following stories in Genesis. In Genesis 6, the sons of elohim “see” the daughters of humanity are “good” and they “take” what they want. Then in Genesis 11 in the story of Babylon, the people say, “let us build for ourselves a city and a tower, and it’s head will be in the skies, and we will make a name for ourselves.” In the story of Cain and Abel, Tim notes, God tells Cain that if he does good, he too will be exalted. Instead, Cain chooses to take his brother’s life, rejecting God’s generosity and claiming the life of his brother. Thank you to all our supporters! Find all our resources at www.thebibleproject.com Show Produced by: Dan Gummel, Tim Mackie Show Music: Defender Instrumental by Tents Spiral by KV Twin Moon by Ashley Shadow Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/12/201939 minutes, 54 seconds
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Abundance or Scarcity - Generosity E1

In this series, Tim and Jon trace the theme of generosity and abundance through the Scriptures. In part 1 (0-7:45), the guys quickly introduce the conversation. Tim explains that generosity is both a theme and a concept that is found throughout the Scriptures. In part 2 (7:45-32:10), Tim shares from a famous passage in the gospel accounts. 
Luke 12:22-34
 "And He said to His disciples, 'For this reason I tell you, don’t be anxious about your life, what you will eat; and don’t be anxious about your body, what clothes you put on. For life is more than food, and the body more than clothing. Ponder the ravens, for they don’t sow seed or reap a harvest; they have no storerooms or barns, and yet God feeds them; how much more valuable you are than the birds! And which of you by worrying can add an hour to his life’s span? And if you cannot do even a very little thing, why do you worry about other matters? Ponder the lilies, how they grow: they don’t toil or spin clothes; but I tell you, not even Solomon in all his glory clothed himself like one of these. But if God so clothes the grass in the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the furnace, how much more will He clothe you? You who trust God so little! And do not seek what you will eat and what you will drink, and don’t foster your anxiety. For all these things the nations of the world eagerly seek; and your Father knows that you need these things. But seek His kingdom, and these things will be granted to you. Do not be afraid, little flock, for your Father has chosen gladly to give you the kingdom. Sell your possessions and give to the poor; make yourselves money belts which do not wear out, an unfailing treasure in heaven, where no thief comes near nor moth destroys. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.'" Tim points out that freedom from anxiety is rooted in a conception of the universe, like a safe place where I’m welcomed by a generous host. The same overabundance we see in nature comes from a Creator who shows that same generosity towards us. This mindset frees us from a scarcity mentality, releasing us to freely give resources to others. Jesus observed this not primarily as a religious principle but as one written on the DNA of the universe. Jesus sees the birds and flowers and grass and notices God’s generosity and overabundant love. 
The words of Jesus sound almost irresponsible to Type A, hardworking people. Yet with these words, Jesus articulates a way of seeing the world rooted in the Hebrew Scriptures and their depiction of God’s generosity. Tim notes that often we’re the ones who need our eyes opened to see God’s generosity in creation. In part 3 (32:10-36:30), Tim points out Jesus’ view of creation, that God created a good world that always produces enough, as long as humans live in accordance with the image of God. In part 4 (36:30-53:20), Tim asks: What kind of tradition and culture did Jesus grown up in that allowed him to have this mindset? One passage Tim offers is Psalm 104:10-17 and 24-28: He sends forth springs in the valleys; They flow between the mountains; They give drink to every beast of the field; The wild donkeys quench their thirst. Beside them the birds of the heavens dwell; They lift up their voices among the branches. He waters the mountains from His upper chambers; The earth is satisfied with the fruit of His works. He causes the grass to grow for the cattle, And vegetation for the labor of man, So that he may bring forth food from the earth, And wine which makes man’s heart glad, So that he may make his face glisten with oil, And food which sustains man’s heart. The trees of the Lord drink their fill, The cedars of Lebanon which He planted, Where the birds build their nests, And the stork, whose home is the fir trees. O Lord, how many are Your works! In wisdom You have made them all; The earth is full of Your possessions. There is the sea, great and broad, In which are swarms without number, Animals both small and great. There the ships move along, And Leviathan, which You have formed to sport in it. They all wait for You To give them their food in due season. You give to them, they gather it up; You open Your hand, they are satisfied with good. 
Tim points out that this is a Psalm Jesus would have grown up hearing in synagogue. Jesus believed creation is an expression of the generous, creative love of God. Genesis 1-2 shows us that God brings order out of chaos (Gen. 1) and a garden out of a wasteland (Gen. 2). These God gives as a gift to humanity. One way of thinking of the biblical storyline, Tim points out, is as a story of giving and taking. Yahweh God creates a wonderful world, full of potential, and he gives it to humanity to rule with him through wisdom. Humanity then desires to rule on their own terms and takes creation for themselves. In part 5 (53:20-end), Tim points out the human problem, not only on a societal level, but on a heart level. By default, we act to benefit ourselves. In the midst of this, Tim notes, the Bible’s view on wealth is complex. Jesus talks about wealth and money more than most topics—a top-three subject of conversation. Scripture is suspicious about wealth, knowing how affluence and abundance can make humans indulgent and arrogant. Thank you to all our supporters! Find our resources at www.thebibleproject.com Show Produced by: Dan Gummel, Tim Mackie Show Music: • Defender Instrumental by Tents • Conquer by Beautiful Eulogy • Shot in the Back of the Head by Moby • Scream Pilots by Moby • Analogs by Moby Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
8/5/20191 hour, 8 minutes, 49 seconds
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Wisdom Q&R - Wisdom E7

Wisdom Q+R 
Welcome to our Q+R on the Wisdom Literature in the Bible! 
In this episode, Tim and Jon respond to seven questions. You can read those questions with their timestamps below. Toonna from Canada (1:55):
Hi, Tim and Jon. My name is Toonna and I am calling from Canada. I'm Nigerian, but I currently live in Canada. I just got done listening to the podcast of the tree of knowing good and bad. Towards the end of the podcast, I was really interested in the conversation around the fear of the Lord and wisdom, how Adam and Eve were afraid of God after they ate of the fruit of the tree of good and bad but not afraid before, enough to not eat of the fruit. So I was curious if you have any thoughts on how we as Christians today can be possessed or consumed by the fear of the Lord enough to not commit sin today. Thank you very much. Jan from Texas (21:10):
I was especially interested in your commentary on the role of the woman as the 'ezer, implying that she's someone provided for the adam to address the "not good" situation of his being alone and which then allows him to fulfill his mission "as designed" (so to speak). I'm curious, though, about how to reconcile this with Paul's statements in 1 Corinthians 7 regarding his wish that church members would remain unmarried (as he is). Typically, I've been taught that Paul was better able to fulfill his mission because of his single status, which seems a little at odds with the ideas discussed in these recent podcasts. So my question is: What's the best/most accurate way to handle Paul's teachings, especially viewed through the lens of the wisdom literature in particular? I feel like there's probably something my 21st-century Western mind is missing. Wesley from California (45:45):
Hi, Tim and Jon, this is Wesley from Chowchilla, California. In your video on the Books of Solomon, you mentioned that Ecclesiastes is like Solomon as an old man reflecting on his life. In 1 Kings 11, Solomon dies apostate as king. I've been reading Tremper Longman's New International Commentary on Ecclesiastes, and in it he argues that Solomon did not write Ecclesiastes but that Collette is taking on Solomon's persona to make his point. And he seems to abandon this persona after three chapters. Can I get your thoughts on this idea? Also, I just want to say that I love The Bible Project. Thank you for everything you guys do. Taylor from Tennessee (49:23):
Hey guys, this is Taylor from Knoxville, Tennessee. I'm trying to gain a better understanding of wisdom, and it appears that the opposite of wisdom is doing what is right in your own eyes. It seems that that's the underlying theme of the book of Judges, and I was curious to see if there was any correlation or relationship that the authors try to make there with wisdom. Brad from Wisconsin (53:10):
My question came up about midway through the series, and it has to do with David. Does he play any role in the Wisdom Literature of the Bible, or is the major theme of wisdom attributed to Solomon exclusively? I see Solomon's portrayal of wisdom to be a piece of what it means to be an image bearer. Does King David share a similar motif? Micah from Oregon (56:35):
Hi, my name is Micah Sharp. I'm from Newberg, Oregon. Here's my question. If we're switching from the wisdom literature to the classification of the books of Solomon, where does the book of Job now fit in the wider Hebrew Bible? Thank you. Kayleigh from South Africa (1:02:47):
My question is about the Song of Songs. I was wondering if there's a connection between the two lovers in the Song of Songs who never get to fully consummate their love for each other and the New Jerusalem as a bride of the Lamb in Revelation? Could this be, in a sense, when the two lovers get to completely unite with each other in Revelation? I'd love to hear your thoughts on this. Thank you to all our supporters! Find out more at www.thebibleproject.com Show Resources: Our video on How to Read the Books of Solomon: https://youtu.be/WJgt1vRkPbI An Obituary for Wisdom Literature by Will Kynes Show Music: Defender Instrumental by Tents Show Produced by: Dan Gummel Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/29/20191 hour, 12 minutes, 48 seconds
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Did Jesus Really Think He Was God? - Feat. Dr. Crispin Fletcher-Louis

Crispin points out that in modern academia, it is often assumed that Christ didn’t consider himself divine. Instead, academics consider that Christ’s divinity was later imposed on him by the early church. Crispin points to some weaknesses in this argument and offers some refreshing critiques. Included in his points are: • The high priest is a new Adam. • The high priest as “God’s image” is tied to the idea of the temple as a microcosm. • The high priest is, in a sense, “Israel.” • Because the high priest is a representative of Israel, he is also a royal figure, because one of the tribes of Israel is the royal line (the tribe of Judah). • The high priest is an office, not a person. About Dr. Fletcher-Louis: Dr. Crispin Fletcher-Louis is a biblical scholar and teacher. He studied at Keble College, Oxford as an undergraduate when E.P. Sanders and N.T. Wright were University lecturers, and for his doctorate, under Chris Rowland (on angelology in Luke’s Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles). He then taught in the Theology and Religious Studies departments of King’s College, London, Durham University, and Nottingham University. From 2004–2006 he served as Resident Theologian at St Mary’s Bryanston Sq., a thriving church in Central London. With growing demand for deeper theological teaching across the region, in 2006 he spearheaded the creation of Westminster Theological Centre (WTC). In July 2012 Crispin stepped down as Principal of WTC and is now engaged in research, writing, and the development of new teaching material. He continues to provide informal teaching to local churches and consultancy to businesses interested in the optimization of material and spiritual value creation. His research and teaching focuses on the overarching shape of the biblical story (its key themes and theological questions). In particular, he writes about the nature of our human identity and purpose, temple worship and spirituality, apocalyptic and Jewish mysticism, Jesus’ identity (Christology) and the Gospel accounts of his life. Crispin is currently engaged in a four-volume book writing project on Jesus and the origins of the earliest beliefs about him (Jesus Monotheism). The first volume (Jesus Monotheism. Volume 1. Christological Origins: The Emerging Consensus and Beyond) (hard copy: Eugene, Or: Wipf & Stock; digital copy: Whymanity) appeared in 2015. There is a blog dedicated to the Jesus Monotheism project. For more on Crispin’s academic work you can visit his webpage at academia.edu. Crispin is married to Mary and has two children, Emily and Reuben. Resources: • http://www.whymanity.com/ • http://www.crispinfl.com • http://jesusmonotheism.com/usd/ • https://www.amazon.com/Jesus-Monotheism-Christological-Emerging-Consensus/dp/1620328895 Show Produced by: Dan Gummel Show music: • Defender Instrumental by Tents • Acquired in Heaven by Beautiful Eulogy Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/22/20191 hour, 7 minutes, 42 seconds
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Solomon the Cynic & the Job You Never Knew - Wisdom E6

In part 1 (0-24:15), Tim and Jon discuss the book of Ecclesiastes. This book can most easily be described as a portrait of “foolish Solomon,” who looks back at his accomplishments as failure and hevel. Tim points out that the start of the book begins by creating a “Solomon-like” persona. Ecclesiastes 1:1 “The words of the preacher son of David, king in Jerusalem...” (NASB, ESV, KJV) “The words of the teacher, son of David, king in Jerusalem...” (NIV, NRSV) However, there is a translation problem: This word does not mean “teacher” in the original Hebrew. Hebrew noun (קהלת (qoheleth, from the verb qahal (קהל ,(meaning “to assemble, convene.” The Hebrew word is Qoheleth—the one who holds or convenes an assembly, i.e. the “leader of the assembly” (Heb. qahal). So this word is best understood as an assembler or convener. The word is also used in 1 Kings 8:1, “Then Solomon assembled the elders of Israel and all the heads of the tribes... to bring up the ark of the covenant of the Lord from the city of David, which is Zion. All the men of Israel assembled themselves to King Solomon at the feast.” Tim’s point is that there are multiple leaders who assemble or convene Israel in the Bible. Who holds assemblies in Israel’s story? • Moses (Exod 35:1; Lev 8:1-3) • David (1 Chron 13:5; 15:3; 28:1) • Solomon (1 Kings 8:1; 2 Chron 5:2-3) • Rehoboam (Solomon’s son, 1 Kings 12:21; 2 Chron 11:1) • Asa (2 Chron 15:9-10) • Jehoshaphat (2 Chron 20:3-5) • Hezekiah (2 Chron 30:12-13) Tim cites scholar Jennie Barbour for additional clarification: “The name Qoheleth ‘the one who convenes the assembly’ is a label with royal associations— after Moses, only kings summon all-Israelite assemblies, and those associations take in more kings than just Solomon. Qoheleth’s name casts him as a royal archetype, not an ‘everyman’ so much as an ‘everyking.’” (Jenny Barbour, The Story of Israel in the Book of Qoheleth, p. 25-26) Any generation of Jerusalem’s kings could be called “son of David,” and the author tips his hat in Ecclesiastes 2:9, “I increased more than all who preceded me in Jerusalem.” (And the only person who reigned before him in Jerusalem was his father David.) Tim explains that the jaded king-author of Ecclesiastes brings a realism in light of Genesis 3, framing the world as life “under the sun,” or life outside of Eden. This king is realizing the curse of Genesis 3: painful toil and dust to dust. Tim further points out that Ecclesiastes offers a Solomon-like profile of the wealthy sons of David, who discovered that riches, honor, power, and women do not bring the life of Eden. Further, while many people assume that the descriptions solely describe the life of Solomon, Tim points out that they also map very closely onto the life of Hezekiah. Take a look at these two passages: Ecclesiastes 2:4-8 I made great my works: I built houses for myself, I planted vineyards for myself; I made gardens and parks for myself and I planted in them all kinds of fruit trees; I made ponds of water for myself from which to irrigate a forest of growing trees. I bought male and female slaves and I had homeborn slaves. Also I possessed flocks and herds more abundant than all who preceded me in Jerusalem. Also, I collected for myself silver and gold and the treasure of kings and provinces. I provided for myself male and female singers and the pleasures of men—many concubines. Hezekiah in 2 Chronicles 32:27-30 Now Hezekiah had immense riches and honor; and he made for himself treasuries for silver, gold, precious stones, spices, shields and all kinds of valuable articles, collection-houses also for the produce of grain, wine and oil, pens for all kinds of cattle and sheepfolds for the flocks. He made cities for himself and acquired flocks and herds in abundance, for God had given him very great wealth. It was Hezekiah who stopped the upper outlet of the waters of Gihon and directed them to the west side of the city of David. And Hezekiah prospered in all his works. Tim cites Jennie Barbour again: “In all of these ways [building projects, riches, royal treasuries, pools, singers] the royal boast in Eccles. 2:4-10 displays a king’s achievements in terms that show an author of the Second Temple period reading an interpreting the earlier stories of Israel’s kings...the writer has pulled together texts and motifs from Israel’s histories...to show that the paradigm king, Solomon, set the mould that was continually replicated through the rest of Israel’s monarchy down to the exile.” (Jennie Barbour, The Story of Israel in the Book of Qoheleth, 23-24) In part 2 (24:15- 31:45), Jon asks how the narrative frame of Ecclesiastes being about all of Israel’s kings—not just about Solomon—affects someone’s reading? Tim says he thinks it makes the story more universal. All rulers and all humans struggle with the same things that Solomon and other rulers have felt throughout history. In part 3 (31:45-50:15), Tim and Jon turn their attention to the book of Job. Tim notes that he’s recently learned of some new and fascinating layers to the book. Tim notes that Job is positioned as a new type of Adam. He actually is portrayed as being righteous and upright. So he’s an ideal wise person who has prospered during his life. Tim focuses on the beginning and end of the book. Specifically the ending of the book, Tim finds new insights to ponder. Tim notes that Job is portrayed as the righteous sufferer. Everything that has happened to him is unfair. Then Tim dives into Job 42:7-10: “And it came about after Yahweh had spoken these words to Job, and Yahweh said to Eliphaz the Temanite, “My anger is kindled against you and against your two friends, because you have not spoken of Me what is right as My servant Job has. “And now, take for yourselves seven bulls and seven rams, and go to My servant Job, and offer up a burnt offering for yourselves, and My servant Job will pray for you. For I will lift up his face so that I may not commit an outrage with you, because you have not spoken of Me what is right, as My servant Job has.” So Eliphaz the Temanite and Bildad the Shuhite and Zophar the Naamathite went and they did as Yahweh told them; and the Lord lifted the face of Job. And Yahweh restored the fortunes of Job while he prayed on behalf of his companions, and Yahweh added to everything that belonged to Job, two-fold.” The operative phrase Tim focuses on is “while he prayed.” Tim says this is a better translation of the original Hebrew phrase. Tim notes that it’s as if Job’s righteous suffering has uniquely positioned him to intercede on behalf of his friends to God. In part 4, (50:15-60:00) Tim shares a few quotes from scholar David Clines regarding Job’s intercession in 42:10. “[W]e must remember that Job has not yet been restored when the friends bring their request to him for his prayer. He is presumably still on the ash-heap. He has no inkling that Yahweh intends to reverse his fortunes. All he knows is that he is still suffering at Yahweh’s hand, and, if it is difficult for the friends to acknowledge the divine judgment against them, it must be no less difficult for Job to accept this second-hand instruction to offer prayer for people he must be totally disenchanted with; he certainly owes them nothing... Is this yet another ‘test’ that Job must undergo before he is restored? “The wording of Job 42:10 makes it seem as if Job’s restoration is dependent on his prayer on their behalf, as if his last trial of all will be to take his stand on the side of his ‘torturer- comforters.’ It is true that this prayer is the first selfless act that Job has performed since his misfortunes overtook him—not that we much begrudge him the self-centeredness that has dominated his speech throughout the book. Perhaps his renewed orientation to the needs of others is the first sign that he has abandoned his inward-looking mourning and is ready to accept consolation. In any case, in the very act of offering his prayer on the friends’ behalf his own restoration is said to take effect: the Hebrew says, “Yahweh restored the fortunes of Job while he was praying for his friends” (not, as most versions, “when (or after) he had prayed for his friends”).” David J. A. Clines, Job 38–42, vol. 18B, Word Biblical Commentary (Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, 2011), 1235. Tim notes that the point of the story of Job is that he suffers unfairly, but the righteous sufferer is someone that God elevates to a place of authority, someone who God listens to when they intercede for others. In part 5 (60:00-end), Tim and Jon briefly recap the series as a whole. Thank you to all our supporters! Send us your questions for our Wisdom Q+R! You can email your audio question to [email protected]. Show Produced by: Dan Gummel, Tim Mackie Show music: Defender Instrumental by Tents Sunshine by Seneca B Surf Report by Cloudchord Soul Food Horns levitating by intention_ In Your Heart by Distant.Io Show Resources: Jennie Barbour, The Story of Israel in the Book of Qoheleth. David J. A. Clines, Job 38–42, vol. 18B, Word Biblical Commentary (Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, 2011). The Bible Project video: How to Read the Wisdom Books of the Bible (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJgt1vRkPbI) Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/15/20191 hour, 5 minutes, 29 seconds
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Destined for Glory - Feat. Dr. Haley Jacob

Welcome to this special episode of The Bible Project podcast! In this episode, Tim and Jon sit down with theologian and scholar Dr. Haley Goranson Jacob and discuss her book, Conformed to the Image of His Son: Reconsidering Paul's Theology of Glory in Romans. Haley is an assistant professor of Theology at Whitworth University in Spokane, Washington. The guys and Haley discuss different lenses used to understand Paul’s theology around the word “glory” and different ideas of what it means to become Christlike. Thank you to all of our supporters! Show Resources: Haley's book: https://www.ivpress.com/conformed-to-the-image-of-his-son Haley’s bio: https://www.whitworth.edu/cms/academics/theology/newsletter/profiles/haley-goranson/ Show Produced by: Dan Gummel Show Music: Defender Instrumental, Tents Powered and distributed by Simplecast
7/11/201957 minutes, 30 seconds
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Song of Songs: Semi-Erotic Love Poetry - Wisdom E5

In part 1(0-15:50), the guys discuss the first major question about this book: Is Song of Songs truly wisdom literature? Tim notes that there are multiple levels of interpretation. The most obvious one views Song of Songs as semi-erotic love poetry. While this isn’t wrong, Tim notes that a deeper reading can metaphorically map the man and woman’s sexual love for one another onto the human pursuit and quest for wisdom. Jon says that this view of interpreting Song of Songs is new to him. The reason, Tim notes, is because modern biblical scholarship often tends to see only what it wants to see. Tim adds that multiple historical scholars note the double and triple meanings throughout the book. In part 2 (15:50-33:30), the guys dive into the book. Tim outlines a few basic facts about the book:  • The poems go back and forth between a man and woman: The man is called “king” (1:4, 12) and “shepherd” (1:7). • The name “Solomon” is never marked as a speaker, and the main question is whether the lover (“my beloved”), who is called “king” and “shepherd,” is Solomon or a distinct figure. Notice the word “beloved” (dod, דוד), spelled with the same letters as “David” (דוד), who was both a king and shepherd (whereas Solomon was only a king). • The woman is called “whom I love” and “the Shulamite” (which is the feminine of Solomon’s name. It would be similar in English to “Daniel” and “Danielle”). Tim cites Roland Murphy: “On one level, the [Song of Songs] is a collection of love songs. However, as edited [to be part of the Hebrew Bible], do these poems have a wisdom-character on another level of understanding? First, there is the fact that ancient Jewish tradition...attributed this work to Solomon (Song 1:1)... it was mean to be read as a work in the Solomonic wisdom tradition… [T]here is an affinity between wisdom and eros in the wisdom literature. The quest for wisdom is a quest for the beloved…. The language and imagery used to describe the pursuit of Lady Wisdom [in Proverbs 1-9] are drawn from the experience of love. The Song of Songs speaks of love between a man and a woman...it is by that very fact open to a wisdom interpretation. Wisdom is to be “found” (Prov 3:13; 8:17, 35), just as one “finds” a good wife (Prov 18:22; 31:10).... [Both] Wisdom and a wife are called “favor from the Lord” (Prov 8:35 and 18:22). The sage advises the youth to “obtain Wisdom,” to love and embrace her (Prov 4:6-8). The youth is to say, “Wisdom, you are my sister” (Prov 7:4), just as the beloved in the Song of Songs is called “my sister (Song 4:9-5:1)... It is precisely the link between eros and wisdom that opens the Song of Songs to another level of understanding. While it is not ‘wisdom literature,’ its echoes reach beyond human sexual love to remind one of the love of Lady Wisdom…” (Roland Murphy, The Tree of Life: An Exploration of Biblical Wisdom Literature, pp. 106-107.) In part 3 (33:30-47:00), Jon notes with this interpretation that the female character is the “divine” character. In most popular interpretations, Solomon is closer to the Christ figure, and the woman is as the Church—making the male the “divine” character. Tim then dives into the literary design of the book. The Song is designed as a symmetry (see the work of Cheryl Exum and William Shea). The Literary Macrostructure of Song of Songs: 1:2-2:7 Mutual Love
B. 2:8-17 Coming and Going C. 3:1-5 Dream 1: Lost and Found D. 3:6-11 Praise of Groom 1
E. 4:1-7 Praise of Bride 1
F. 4:8-15 Praise of Bride 2 G. 4:16 Invitation by Bride
G. Acceptance and Invitation by Groom and Divine Approbation C. 5:2-8 Dream 2: Found and Lost D. 5:9-6:3 Praise of Groom 2 E. 6:4-12 Praise of Bride 3 F. 7:1 Praise of Bride 4 B. 7:11-8:2 Going and Coming
8:3-14 Mutual Love (Chart by Richard M. Davidson) Tim points out that the first half explores the engagement, passion, and constant desire and pursuit of the lovers, though their embrace is cut short multiple times. The second half mirrors the first, but this time it depicts the royal wedding of Solomon and his Solomon-ess bride. The beloved is described in precisely the language of Lady Wisdom in Proverbs 1-9, the God-given wife in Proverbs 5, and the woman of valor in Proverbs 31 (see Claudia Camp, Wisdom and the Feminine in the Book of Proverbs). Verses like this can show how the corresponding language maps onto each other. Lady Wisdom in Proverbs

Proverbs 4:5-9
“Acquire wisdom! Acquire understanding!
Do not forget nor turn away from the words of my mouth.
Do not forsake her, and she will guard you;
Love her, and she will watch over you.
The beginning of wisdom is: Acquire wisdom;
And with all your acquiring, get understanding.
Prize her, and she will exalt you;
She will honor you if you embrace her.
She will place on your head a garland of grace;
She will present you with a crown of beauty.”
 The Beloved in Song of Songs Song 2:3-4, 6
“Like an apple tree among the trees of the forest,
So is my beloved among the young men.
In his shade I took great delight and sat down,
And his fruit was sweet to my taste.
He has brought me to his banquet hall,
And his banner over me is love….
Let his left hand be under my head
And his right hand embrace me.” Song 3:11
“Go forth, O daughters of Zion,
And gaze on King Solomon with the crown
With which his mother has crowned him
On the day of his wedding,
And on the day of his gladness of heart.” Tim notes that conversely, the beloved is also described in the language of the wayward woman in Proverbs 1-9. 
Wayward woman of Proverbs 1-9 
Proverbs 5:3 “For the lips of the strange woman drip with honey (נפת תטפנה שפתי זרה), and her mouth (חך) is smoother than oil.” 
Proverbs 7:6, 8
“The strange woman... the foreign woman whose words are smooth… A man passes through the street (שוק), and takes the way (דרך) to her house. 
Proverbs 7:13, 15, 17
“She grabs him and kisses him… ‘Therefore I have come out to meet you, to seek your presence earnestly, and I have found you…. I have sprinkled my bed with myrrh, aloe, and cinnamon.’” Compare those verses with the beloved in Song of Songs. 
Song 4:11 “O bride, your lips drip with honey (נפת תטפנה שפתותיך), honey and fat are under your tongue…”
 Song 3:2
“I arose and went around in the city, in the streets and squares, I sought the one my being loves…”
 Songs 3:1, 4
“On my bed at night, I sought the one my being loves, I sought him but could not find him… No sooner did I pass by them, then I found the one my being loves, and grabbed him and I did not let go….” Songs 1:16 “Behold, your beauty my companion...behold your beauty my beloved, so lovely, indeed our couch is luxuriant.” What is the point? It’s as if the beloved represented the healing of the wayward woman into one ultimate lover. The ideal Solomon is converted from a lover of many women into a lover of one, reversing the fall of Adam and Eve, Yahweh and Israel, Solomon and his many wives. Lady Wisdom (who we met in Proverbs) is finally embraced by the son of David. She is constantly searching for her lover (as Lady Wisdom searches in Prov. 1-9). In part 4 (47:00-52:30), Jon comments that to him, the human sexual drive is confusing, especially when viewed in a Christian lens. How do you map a biological longing for sex onto a book like Song of Songs? 
Tim says that the desire is sexual, but it’s also more than sexual. It’s a desire to know and be known., to become one with something and someone. It’s a desire for unity. Humanity’s desire for sex, Tim compares, is analogous to our desire for wisdom and unity. In part 5 (52:30-end), Tim cites scholar Peter Leithart as a helpful resource to learn more about Song of Songs. Tim closes the episode with a quote from scholar Ellen Davis: 
“Loss of intimacy is exactly what happened in Eden. Eden was the place where God was most intimate with humanity. Witness God “taking a walk in the garden in the breezy part of the day” (Gen. 3:8), obviously expecting to have the humans for company, and calling out—“Where are you?”—when they do not appear. There is good reason to imagine that God intended to impart wisdom to humanity on those walks, little by little. But when Eve and Adam disregarded God and tried the direct route to “knowledge of good and evil,” the immediate result was not literal death. Rather, it was distrust breaking into the relationship between God and humanity. It was blame erupting between man and woman (Gen. 3:12) and the onset of a long-term imbalance of power between them (Gen. 3:16). It was a curse on the fertile soil and enmity between the woman’s seed and the snake’s (Gen. 3:15, 17).... The exile from Eden represents the loss of intimacy in three primary spheres of relationship: between God and humanity, between woman and man, and between human and nonhuman creation. Correspondingly, the Song uses language to evoke a vision of healing in all three areas. More accurately, it reuses language from other parts of Scripture; verbal echoes explicitly connect the garden of the lovers with the two earlier gardens, that of Eden and of Israel’s temple.” (Ellen Davis, “Reading the Song of Songs Iconographically,” pg. 179) Thank you to all our supporters! Show Resources:  • Peter Leithart Podcasts on Song of Songs (https://www.theopolispodcast.com/episodes) • Ellen Davis, “Reading the Song of Songs Iconographically” • Claudia Camp, Wisdom and the Feminine in the Book of Proverbs • Cheryl Exum, Song of Songs: A Commentary • Roland Murphy, The Tree of Life: An Exploration of Biblical Wisdom Literature Show Music:  • Defender Instrumental by Tents • Identity by B-Side • albatros by plusma • faces by knowmadic • Aerocity by Cold Weather Kids • Some music brought to you by the generous folks at chillhop music. Chillhop.com Show Produced by: Dan Gummel, Jon Collins Powered and distributed by Simplecast.
7/8/20191 hour, 4 minutes, 42 seconds
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Proverbs: Lady Wisdom & Lady Folly - Wisdom E4

In part 1 (start-17:45), the guys briefly recap the series so far. Jon summarizes by saying that the overarching theme is the human calling to rule, as outlined in the Genesis and garden of Eden narrative. The question is, will humans rule wisely or foolishly? In part 2 (17:45-27:00), Tim and Jon discuss how Proverbs lays out two paths, which are the same two paths outlined in Genesis. A person can either choose to live wisely, depicted as listening to “Lady Wisdom,” or a person can choose to live foolishly, depicted as listening to “Lady Folly.” Early in Proverbs, the “Solomon” narrator warns the “seed of David” about how to live in the fear of Yahweh and discover true wisdom. The wise and righteous man embraces Lady Wisdom (Proverbs 1, 3, 8, 9). The goal of finding “a woman of valor” (Prov. 5, 31) avoids the wicked and violent man, avoids Lady Folly (Prov. 9), and avoids the “wayward woman” (characterized as an adulteress). Tim notes that there are four speeches each that talk about Lady Wisdom and Lady Folly, for a total of eight speeches. The components of these speeches are designed to mirror each other. In part 3 (27:00-39:00), Tim outlines Proverbs 9, which is an example of the two women mirroring each other. Proverbs 9:1-6 "Wisdom has built her house, She has hewn out her seven pillars; She has prepared her food, she has mixed her wine; She has also set her table; She has sent out her maidens, she calls From the tops of the high places of the city: ‘Whoever is naive, let him turn in here!’ To him who lacks understanding she says, ‘Come, eat of my bread And drink of the wine I have mixed. ‘Forsake your folly and live, And proceed in the way of understanding.’” Proverbs 9:13-18 “The woman of folly is boisterous, She is naive and knows nothing. She sits at the doorway