Winamp Logo
BC Today from CBC Radio British Columbia Cover
BC Today from CBC Radio British Columbia Profile

BC Today from CBC Radio British Columbia

English, Newspapers, 1 season, 318 episodes, 4 days, 6 hours, 14 minutes
About
BC Today is where British Columbians connect on issues facing their lives and their community. Every week day at noon PT and 1pm MT, BC Today host Michelle Eliot delves into the top story for the province.
Episode Artwork

COVID-19 cases spike; Nelson resident in Morocco; Remembering Kuljeet Kaila; and how university students are facing the rising cost of living

As COVID-19 case numbers climb in B.C., we hear from the Provincial Health Officer, Dr Bonnie Henry, on the precautions needed in the province. We also hear from a Nelson resident who arrived in Morocco just four hours before Friday's devastating earthquake. Then, we remember our dear friend and colleague, Kuljeet Kaila, who died from cancer on Sunday. Her brother, Kulvir spoke to us. And lastly, we discuss the rising cost of living for post-secondary students with the B.C. Federation of Students. Their chairperson, and their researcher, join us on our Monday program.
1/1/151 minutes, 2 seconds
Episode Artwork

Premier speaks out on Chinatown stabbings; new COVID-19 vaccine on the way

This past weekend's triple stabbing in Chinatown is drawing outrage from Premier David Eby. The man arrested had been on a day pass from a forensic psychiatric hospital. We'll hear how Eby and the opposition are tackling this incident and the issue of crime. And on our open line, we ask for your thoughts as the province caps rental increases at 3.5%.Is that too much, or too little, for you? We take your calls. And in the second half of our Tuesday show, Health Canada has approved the updated Moderna Covid-19 vaccine. Two medical experts join us to answer your questions.
1/1/148 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC United MLA leaves the party; Surrey hospital opening delayed; how students with disabilities are excluded

Our Wednesday show begins with an interview with MLA Bruce Banman, who today crossed the floor from the BC United Party to the BC Conservatives. On the open line, we talk about the delayed opening of a new Surrey hospital, now pushed back another three years. We discuss what that means for patients. And in the second half of the show: a new report finds little improvement in addressing the exclusion of kids with complex care needs in schools. We hear your experiences, and discuss what's needed to provide a better learning environment.
1/1/150 minutes, 25 seconds
Episode Artwork

Latest on B.C. wildfires; Vancouver expands density bylaw; Brian Minter Friday

Province ends wildfire-related state of emergency, but hundreds of fires are still burning across the province. And, Vancouver has expanded its housing density bylaw but critics say more needs to be done. Next, expert gardener Brian Minter takes your gardening questions.
1/1/149 minutes, 34 seconds
Episode Artwork

Update on Libya; Vancouver's fee hikes; the role of music in our lives

The flooding in Libya has killed at least 5-thousand people, with the number expected to grow. We'll speak with a BC man who was born and raised in Derna. And, Vancouver city council hikes short term rental license fees nearly ten times, to one thousand dollars. Councillor Sarah Kirby Young joins us. And we'll end the show with music education. What difference has learning music made for you?
1/1/151 minutes, 7 seconds
Episode Artwork

Drug decriminalization amendment and federal government accuses India of being involved in murder of Canadian citizen

Today is the first day for an amendment to the province's decriminalization and safe supply pilot. We speak with CBC Vancouver Municipal Affairs reporter Justin McElroy about the "Decriminalization and Public Use" discussion at today's annual Union of B.C. Municipalities' convention and check in with Guy Felicella, Harm Reduction and Recovery Advocate, and Peer Clinical Advisor for the BC Centre on Substance Use. We also brought you breaking news from Ottawa where Prime Minister Trudeau announced that Canadian national security have evidence that India was behind the assassination of Canadian citizen Hardeep Singh Nijjar on June 18 in Surrey, B.C.
1/1/152 minutes, 49 seconds
Episode Artwork

Prime Minister's "bombshell" statement linking India to killing of prominent Sikh Canadian

Explosive allegations by Canada's Prime Minister are reverberating around the world. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says there is credible information the government of India was involved in the killing of a prominent B.C. Sikh leader. We will help you understand this story: its long and complex history, what it means to the Indian diaspora, and its impact on the future of Canada-India relations
1/1/150 minutes, 23 seconds
Episode Artwork

Country-wide protests around gender identity education in schools; Alzheimer's Awareness Month

Protests against gender identity education in schools are taking place across the country today. And they are facing counter protests supporting that education. We'll discuss what IS in the SOGI curriculum. Next, it is Alzheimer's Awareness Month. How can we empower people with dementia?
1/1/150 minutes, 31 seconds
Episode Artwork

India suspending visa applications in Canada; One-on-one about the courageous story of Harry and Valerie Jerome

India is suspending visa applications in Canada as the rift between the two countries grows wider. How does this affect British Columbians planning to travel to that country? Next, the courageous story of Harry and Valerie Jerome. They are much-celebrated for their impact on sports and track and field in Canada. But they also faced horrible racism along the way. Valerie tells us about the book she wrote about their story.
1/1/150 minutes, 39 seconds
Episode Artwork

Ukrainian President in Ottawa; the Premier addresses Union of BC Municipalitles; Strange pets on our pet column

In our first half we hear more about Ukrainian Volodymyr Zenenskyy's address to the House of Commons in Ottawa. We'll also break down Premier David Eby's promises at the annual Union of BC Municipalities. Next, our pets column is back and we're asking about your more unusual pets. Your rabbits, your turtles, your odd snake. What are the challenges when caring for a unique pet?
1/1/148 minutes, 30 seconds
Episode Artwork

Growing calls for the Speaker of the House to resign; New technology for monitoring diabetes care

There are calls for the Speaker of the House to resign, after he invited a Ukrainian war veteran to Parliament, who turns out to have been aligned with a Nazi war unit. Is Anthony Rota's apology enough? Next, new technology to monitor glucose for diabetes patients is now covered in BC. What difference will that make for you?
1/1/145 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. sets new housing targets for 10 municipalities; heading outdoors in the fall

The province turns up the pressure on 10 municipalities to build more housing. Altogether, 60 thousand new units by 2028. Are these targets too hard to meet? Or, are they not enough? Next, heading outdoors! what are your favourite ways to enjoy the beautiful fall weather?
1/1/148 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Are for-profit long-term-care facilities falling short?; AI changing the world of tech jobs

The Speaker of the House is stepping down after inviting to Parliament a Ukrainian veteran who it turns out was aligned with a Nazi unit during the war. On the open line, are for-profit long term care facilities falling short on the amount of personal care? Next, tech jobs are undergoing a massive shift, thanks to AI. What skills do you need to make it?
1/1/146 minutes, 56 seconds
Episode Artwork

Marking Truth and Reconciliation Day; Minter Friday

This weekend is Truth and Reconciliation Day across Canada. We hear about the return of a totem pole that was stolen from the Nisga'a Nation nearly a century ago, how we can make progress towards the 94 calls to action that were issued eight years ago, and hear what you're doing to mark the day. Next, we take your calls with gardening expert, Brian Minter.
1/1/150 minutes, 51 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. gives an update on masking and vaccines

B.C.'s Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix are speaking to discuss COVID-19 masking and fall vaccination.
1/1/150 minutes, 55 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. legislature back for fall session; Have you been ghosted?

The B.C. legislature is back in session today. And the makeup looks a little different, as the BC Conservatives take official status. What impact will the party have on debate? Next, we'll talk about ghosting. No, not the Halloween costume kind, but the not-calling or texting kind.
1/1/149 minutes, 17 seconds
Episode Artwork

More provincial legislation on illicit drug use in public spaces and how food costs are impacting your Thanksgiving

B.C. Premier David Eby announced more measures to limit illicit drug use in public spaces. Our guests Garth Mullins, organizer with Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU) and host of the "Crackdown" podcast; and Smithers Mayor Gladys Atrill talk about the impacts the new legislation may have. And in our second half, Deputy Minister Crystia Freeland announced new plans to reduce food prices. Our guest Chef TJ Conwi from Ono Vancouver, and founder of LunchLAB, and our callers gave us tips and tricks to deal with high food prices when preparing for the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday feasting.
1/1/150 minutes, 20 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C.'s disaster response; Manitoba's historic election; live from the regimental funeral for fallen Constable Rick O'Brien

Wildfire response was top of mind for the province during the first day of the fall legislative session yesterday, with the government introducing sweeping changes. What was your experience this summer? Next, a big national story is the Manitoba election, where Wab Kinew will become the first First Nations provincial premier. And, we go live to a regimental funeral for fallen Constable Rick O'Brien.
1/1/150 minutes, 57 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Ferries faces another busy travel weekend for Thanksgiving; BC Today pet column

BC Ferries faces another busy travel weekend for Thanksgiving...this comes after the province announces planned fines for missed sailings due to staff shortages. Next, our pet column is back, and we talk protecting your pet from coyotes and cold weather.
1/1/148 minutes, 33 seconds
Episode Artwork

Reaction to budget housing plan | Funding for national disability benefit

We hear reaction to the federal housing plan, and the government's budget pledge to "unlock" 3.9 million homes by 2031. We speak with Alexandra Flynn, associate professor, UBC Peter A. Allard School of Law. And, Tuesday's federal budget laid the groundwork for a national disability benefit, but the funding falls well short of what advocates were seeking. We hear from Michelle Hewitt, chair of Disability Without Poverty.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Casualties grow in Israel and Gazal; Eviction protections; How to read nutrition labels

The death doll from the Hamas Israel continues to rise, we hear the latest. And An original story from CBC's Kiran Singh on "bad faith evictions." Next we talk to a registered dietician about how to read nutrition labels.
1/1/150 minutes, 22 seconds
Episode Artwork

Update on Israel-Hamas Conflict; B.C. launches fall vaccines; heat pumps

We hear the the latest on the conflict between Israel and Hamas. Here at home, BC's fall vaccines against COVID and influenza begin today. The BC Centre for Disease Control takes your calls. And, can heat pumps cut your energy cost and your carbon footprint?
1/1/149 minutes, 36 seconds
Episode Artwork

Impact of conflict and war on survivors; Grizzly bear sightings in B.C.; Cybersecurity awareness month

The current violence and horror that continues in Israel and Gaza is deeply rooted in the region's history. We'll talk about the lifetime impact of historical trauma. Next, there are more sightings of grizzly bears in B.C. And in our second half, it's cybersecurity awareness month, we hear how you can protect yourself.
1/1/151 minutes, 2 seconds
Episode Artwork

Israel-Hamas latest; calls to halt standardized tests; fall gardening questions

Amy Bell is our host today. We begin with a new development in a lengthy battle, as the City of Surrey says it's filing a petition in the B.C. Supreme Court, challenging the province's order to transition away from the RCMP to a municipal police force. Also today, Grade 4 and 7 students across B.C. are being asked to take the Foundational Skills Assessment test. The Government says it can give them info on which schools need more support, but teachers associations are pushing back. Finally today, Brian Minter joins us to take all your gardening questions.
1/1/150 minutes, 51 seconds
Episode Artwork

Province cracks down on Airbnb rentals; reducing food waste

We begin today with CBC's Provincial Affairs Reporter Meera Bains bringing us the latest on B.C.'s new legislation designed to help municipalities regulate short-term rentals, and our callers weighed in with their thoughts. We switched gears in the second half to talk with content creator and "Plant You" author Carleigh Bodrug about turning food waste into delicious meals.
1/1/149 minutes, 6 seconds
Episode Artwork

Reaction in B.C. as Israel-Hamas war enters day 11

The war between Israel and Hamas is in its 11th day. We begin with Kyle Matthews, the executive director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies at Concordia University, followed by Jon Allen, senior fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto, and a former Canadian ambassador to Israel. Finally, Vancouver psychiatrist Dr. Diane McIntosh discusses how news out of Israel and Gaza affect people mentally and emotionally.
1/1/150 minutes, 27 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C.'s first strong storm of the fall, dealing with the rain; how to prepare for earthquakes

With B.C.'s first major rainstorm this fall, we get the latest from CBC Reporter Yasmin Gandham in Squamish about rainfall warnings there, a provincial weather update from CBC Climate and Science Specialist Darius Mahdavi and learn how inclement weather impacts those with disabilities with guest Jocelyn Maffi, associate director, Spinal Cord Injury B.C. In our second half, we have an update on the Feb. 7 earthquake in Syria and Turkey from U.B.C. professor of civil engineering professor Tony Yang. And we discuss how prepared we are in the province ahead of tomorrow's Shake Out B.C. event.
1/1/151 minutes, 9 seconds
Episode Artwork

Pedestrian safety in B.C; and learning about mushroom picking

We check in with Vision Zero Vancouver volunteer Jade Buchanan on what's needed for road safety after the death of a 12-year-old cyclist in a tragic road accident in Pitt Meadows yesterday. In our second half, we talks about mushroom picking season with Vancouver Mycological Society Treasurer Tom Balog, and founding member Paul Kroeger. Their society's 42nd annual mushroom show takes place on Sunday at VanDusen Botanical Gardens.
1/1/149 minutes, 20 seconds
Episode Artwork

Update on the Middle East conflict; Changes to pets in rentals legislation; and Christine Sinclair's impending retirement

As two American-Israeli hostages are released and United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres has arrived at the Rafah border today to plead for humanitarian aid to get through to the Palestinian territories, we check in on the lastest developments in the Israel-Hamas conflict with Carleton University political science professor Mira Sucharov. Meghann Cant, BC SPCA's manager of companion animal welfare science and policy joins us to discuss the onoging issue of finding rental housing as a pet owner. And in our last segment, Shireen Ahmed, senior contributor for CBC Sports analyses what's known about soccer star Christine Sinclair's impending retirement.
1/1/151 minutes, 4 seconds
Episode Artwork

Live music drama; new fast-track provincial legislation; and getting ready for Halloween

We explore the fall out from Lil Yachty's concert cancellation in Vancouver with pop culture journalist Kelsey Barnes; B.C. Premier David Eby introduces promised legislation to remove barriers for qualified foreign professionals. We speak with David Lee, Director of Employment, Language, and Social Enterprise at MOSAIC for more. And in our last half hour, we take your calls on your Halloween memories and talk with Chef Francisco Higareda, Ophelia's Executive Chef about Dia de Los Muertos food and traditions.
1/1/150 minutes, 18 seconds
Episode Artwork

Housing supply and real estate investment

We dig into the complexities of what we're facing in B.C. for housing affordability and new legislation designed to control short-term rentals and convert it to long-term rentals stock. Our first guest, Statistics Canada's senior analyst Joshua Gordon, looks at the stats behind ownership in B.C. Our second guest, Robert Patterson, lawyer and tenant advocate with Tenant Resource & Advisory Centre (TRAC) discusses the impact of different kinds of ownership on tenants. And our third guest, Mark Ting, partner with Foundation Wealth and CBC's On the Coast's personal finance columnist takes a look at how high interest rates and recent legislation is affecting owners and investors.
1/1/150 minutes, 23 seconds
Episode Artwork

Hurricane Otis' impact; surging need for food banks; and the rise in gender-based violence

Bunaby resident Claudia Camilo joins us to talk about what she and her family are experiencing after Hurricane Otis battered Acapulco and much of the Guerrero province, including her hometown of Chilpancingo, Mexico. Visits to food banks in B.C. have skyrocketed and demand remains high, we check in with Paul Legace, coordinator and poverty law advocate for the Prince Rupert unemployment action centre. In our last segment, we check in with Angela-Marie MacDougall, executive director, Battered Women's Support Society on the need for a coordinated response to gender-based violence. And we read your e-mails about yesterday's topic of real estate investment.
1/1/150 minutes, 56 seconds
Episode Artwork

Restaurants are struggling; and it's the time of year for your favourite horror movies

The Restaurants Canada's 2023 Foodservice Facts report shows that half of restaurant owners are operating at a loss or just breaking even. We check in with Amelie Nguyen, co-founder of Anh and Chi Restaurant in Vancouver about what she's experiencing and what she sees in the industry. And for our second half, we get into the Halloween spirit with your favourite horror movies. Guest Rachel Fox, program director at the Rio Theatre gives her favourites and our callers also gave us some excellent titles.
1/1/149 minutes, 23 seconds
Episode Artwork

Love or hate the fireworks; Brian Minter's gardening tips

With Halloween just around the corner, fireworks are on many minds. While they traditionally have been used to celebrate this time of year, many municipalities have banned--or are in the process of banning them due to safety, noise adn environmental concerns. We speak with Dave Meers, assistant chief, community safety division with the Vancouver Fire Department about how the ban in Vancouver has reduced injuries and damage over the past two years. And Elizabeth Melnick from Elizabeth's Wildlife Rescue joins us to talk about fireworks' impact on pets, farm animals and wildlife. In the second half, our gardening columnist Brian Minter joins us to talk about preparing our gardens for cooler weather, and takes your gardening questions.
1/1/150 minutes, 2 seconds
Episode Artwork

Baby Bumps and Road Humps: Family Supports and Your Halloween Costumes

The second in our week-long series on the challenges of raising a young family in B.C. looks at the supports that are available for new parents--and those that are lacking. We were joined by Ruth Skutezky, Registered Clinical Counsellor, Illuminate Counselling, and Chizor Vasquez, social worker with Sage Mental Health. For the second half, we talked about costume ideas with Kirsten McGhie, Head of Wardrobe, Arts Club Theatre Company, and had some great suggestions from our callers including picnic tables, spiders and a drunk elk in Banff (that won 3rd prize).
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Baby Bumps and Road Humps: Housing Crisis

We kick off our week-long series looking at the challenges of young families in B.C. Today we speak with Nathan Lauster, U.B.C.'s Department of Sociology associate professor, and author of "The Death and Life of the Single-Family House: Lessons from Vancouver on Building a Livable City", and we take your great questions and comments about the housing crisis.
1/1/150 minutes, 33 seconds
Episode Artwork

Baby Bumps and Road Humps: Climate Change

Today in our week-long series on raising young families in this province, we explore the impact of climate change on parenting decisions. Our guests include Shannon Christensen, Founder and National Director of Mamas for Mamas; Severn Cullis-Suzuki, executive director, David Suzuki Foundation; Meghan Wise, Coordinator at UBC’s Climate HUB, and Kai Chan, professor, UBC’s Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. And your excellent calls made it a thoughtful,
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Taylor Swift concert, small business challenges and Baby Bumps and Speed Humps: passing on cultural traditions

We hear from Mackenzie Byers, a Taylor Swift super fan, about the news that Vancouver will have three Eras tour concerts in 2024; talk about the concerns of small businesses with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business' policy analyst Emily Boston; and explore how best to pass on cultural traditions in our continuing series Baby Bumps and Speed Humps with guests Sammy Jo Rumbaua, community organizer with Tulayan Filipinx and Diaspora Society; Crystal Behn, Indigenous Programmer at the Two Rivers Gallery and Andrea Canales, Director of Children and Youth Services, Lower Mainland Neighbourhood House Society.
1/1/150 minutes, 29 seconds
Episode Artwork

Air Canada says it violated disability regulations in its treatment of B.C. passenger; What pets are best for kids?

A disabled Air Canada passenger went public this week with an experience he called dehumanizing. Rodney Hodgins had to drag himself down the aisle to get off the plane, with no help from airline staff. The story has made headlines and sparked debate in the House of Commons. Air Canada has apologized. But as more stories like this emerge, we speak to an advocate for people with disabilities, and hear from our listeners. And in the second half of our Friday program, we bring you the final part of our series, Baby Bumps and Road Humps. We discuss the role pets play in the lives of families, and learn about the pets that make for the best companions for kids. You can email the program any time at [email protected].
1/1/150 minutes, 10 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C.'s poisoned drug supply and confronting mental health stigma within family and friends

We ask where we are with the poisoned drug epidemic after the provincial mental health and addictions ministry rejected the B.C. Coroners Service's death review panel recommendation to expand safe supply. Our guest B.C.'s Chief Coroner Lisa Lapointe addresses the report and takes questions. Our second half looks at one of the common themes in this year's 27th Vancouver Asian Film Festival: mental health and stigma within the Asian diaspora. Our guests Sidartha Murjani - VAFF Director Feature Films Programming, and Tanya Jade, director of the film "Wallpaper" speak about the issue, and our callers weigh in on how to tackle the stigma around mental wellness.
1/1/152 minutes, 36 seconds
Episode Artwork

Sports behaviour and cozy soups

Controversy erupted after a comment about a referee made by Vancouver Whitecaps' coach Vanni Sartini last Saturday. We speak with Jennifer Walinga, Olympic rower, Professor in Communications and Culture at Royal Roads University about the controversy and take your calls. In our second half, our guest is Evan Paul, President - LoLo Soup Co, The Soup Meister’s Nephew, talking about his late uncle's beloved soup restaurant, his favourite soups and calls from our listeners with theirs, including a Battle of the Broth in Rossland, B.C. in its fifth year.
1/1/152 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Living wage for 2023 and the use of artificial intelligence in the arts

Skyrocketing costs this year have led to an increase in B.C.'s Living Wage to cover the high costs of rent, food and other essentials, Our guest is Anastasia French, Living Wage for Families BC provincial manager and co-author of the 2023 Living Wage report. In our second half, we discuss the use of artificial intelligence in the arts, including the new Beatles' song "Now and Then". Our guests are University of British Columbia PhD student Guanzhong Du, and Arne Eigenfeldt, Professor and Associate Dean of Simon Fraser University's Music and Sound program.
1/1/152 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Human Rights Commissioner Speaks Out; Intimate Partner Violence and Keira's Law

With hate incidents on the rise during the Israeli-Hamas war, B.C.'s Human Rights Commissioner Kasari Govender joins us to discuss what can be done. We continue our series on intimate partner violence with a look at what supports are needed in our family court system. We speak with mother and advocate Jennifer Kagan-Viater about her work on "Keira's Law", a law requiring judges to receive mandatory domestic abuse and coercive control training to consider when making decisions. We also spoke with B.C.'s Attorney General Niki Sharma about the lack of this training in B.C. and how she plans on making changes to the system. Also in the show, CBC reporter Joel Ballard on the end to the actors' strike in Hollywood with his interview with Creative B.C.'s CEO Prem Gill; and CBC's host and reporter Lien Yeung takes us to the scene of a Burnaby bus crash and tells us what the investigation is showing.
1/1/151 minutes, 14 seconds
Episode Artwork

Marking Remembrance Day; Minter Friday

Tomorrow is November 11th, Remembrance Day. We ask who you wear a poppy for, and talk about supports veterans need today. Next, Gardening Expert Brian Minter takes your questions.
1/1/149 minutes, 11 seconds
Episode Artwork

Carbon tax politics and social media finds hidden CBC gem

Debate over the federal carbon tax has come to B.C. We hear from BC United MLA Dan Davies, Peace River North, Rural and Social Development Critic whose party wants to cut the tax. We also hear from U.B.C. Professor of Political Science Kathryn Harrison who specializes in climate and environmental politics. In our second half we meet 90-year-old internet sensation Kathy Brady, a retired dietician whose 1957 CBC video on making pizzas has gone viral (https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1402818181). She is accompanied by her daughter-in-law Debbie Butt who found the video on social media.
1/1/152 minutes, 49 seconds
Episode Artwork

Missing high-risk offender arrested; A look at B.C.'s nursing shortage

Our Tuesday show opens with the news that high-risk offender Randall Hopley has been arrested by Vancouver police. We discuss the circumstances that led to the 10-day search for him, and invite listeners to ask their questions about B.C.'s correctional system. In our second half, we examine Canada's practice of recruiting nurses from overseas, and the impact that has other jurisdictions.
1/1/150 minutes, 5 seconds
Episode Artwork

Debating density in established neighbourhoods; new documentary "Keepers of the Land"

After Vancouver city council voted against a motion brought forward by OneCity's Christine Boyle for city staff to explore policies that would increase density in the Shaughnessy neighbourhood, we hear from A.B.C. councillor Rebecca Bligh who voted against it. Then we discussed the larger issue of how to combat the affordable housing crisis with the challenges of rezoning "tony" neighbourhoods with Thom Armstrong, CEO, Co-op Housing Federation BC, and Jens von Bergmann, Data Scientist, Mountain Math, and co-author of the C.M.H.C.'s "Metro Vancouver Zoning Project". In our last segment we speak with Chief Douglas Neasloss, elected Chief councillor of Kitasoo Xai'xais Nation, and co-director/producer of the Keepers of the Land documentary screening at the Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival.
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Vernon's last walk-in clinic closes; Victoria MP leads change in federal bill on coercive control; B.C. tourism's hidden gems

Paul Adams CBC Reporter Brady Strachan brings us the latest on the closure of the Sterling Centre Walk-In Clinic, Vernon's last walk-in clinic today. We discuss the issue with Paul Adams, Executive Director BC Rural Health Network, and Kath Kitts, Communications Officer, BC Nurses' Union. In our second half, we check in with Victoria NDP MP Laurel Collins, who has introduced a private members' bill in Parliament to amend the Criminal Code to include controlling and coercive conduct. Then, we talk with Vancouver Island University professor of recreation and tourism Jenn Houtby-Ferguson about the internet hoopla over New Westminster being chosen as a prize destination on The Price is Right. She gives us her tips on New Westminster and other destinations in B.C. to visit, and we get your recommendations as well.
1/1/152 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

Surrey police transition debate and fostering pets

B.C.'s Solicitor General Mike Farnworth has suspended the Surrey Police Board, and appointed former Abbotsford chief constable Mike Serr as the administrator. We speak with Minister Farnworth, and with Peter German, the lawyer retained by the City of Surrey who leads the B.C. Supreme Court petition questioning the province's jurisdiction in the transition. In our second half, we discuss fostering with our guest is Lindsay Baker, B.C. SPCA's senior manager of volunteer resources, and your calls.
1/1/152 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Ottawa is promising to do more on the housing crisis, including billions for affordable units

First we hear from Surrey Mayor Brenda Locke who isn't backing down on the policing issue. Next, a full hour on affordable housing, and what you want from the federal government.
1/1/150 minutes, 44 seconds
Episode Artwork

Canada's inflation rate has cooled - but not by much; What's missing in B.C. to support those going through grief?

Canada's inflation rate has cooled, but the cost of living remains high. We're asking how inflation and affordability are affecting you. Next, a new report highlights what supports are needed for people going through grief.
1/1/150 minutes, 33 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. Labour Minister tables legislation to protect gig workers; Ottawa plans to bring relief for mortgage holders

B.C. Labour Minister Harry Bains has tabled legislation to protect gig workers, we ask him what he's pushing for. Next, the federal government says it plans to bring relief to mortgage holders, and soften the blow of rising interest rates.
1/1/150 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

Surrey schools considering creative solutions to ovecrowding; Thrifty Christmas shopping

Surrey schools are facing a major overcrowding problem. Parents, students, and teachers are being asked to consider creative solutions like hybrid work and different school hours. Next, the holiday season is coming up, and we talk about thrift shopping for yourself and loved ones.
1/1/150 minutes, 19 seconds
Episode Artwork

Opinions are divided over a bill that would limit city jurisdiction on homeless encampments; Minter Friday

B.C. is looking to push forward legislation that would limit how municipalities can respond to homeless encampments. But cities and advocates have issues with the bill. Next, expert gardener Brian Minter takes your gardening questions.
1/1/149 minutes, 49 seconds
Episode Artwork

Officials urge parents to educate kids on online risks; How to protect yourself from rental scams

After the tragic death of a 12-year-old boy in Prince George, police are urging parents to talk to their children about online risks. We hear from experts about the potential red flags online. Next, How to protect yourself from rental scams.
1/1/150 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

What's your holiday spending limit; New nation-wide mental health crisis line launches later this week

First, we hear about a dangerous situation around a wolf-dog on Vancouver Island. Next, it's Cyber Monday and the height of holiday shopping. What's your spending limit, and how can people budget when everything seems so expensive? In our second half, a new, 988 mental health crisis hotline launches across Canada.
1/1/149 minutes, 59 seconds
Episode Artwork

One year since 'snowmageddon' hit Metro Vancouver; Sugar free baking; Vancouver International Black Film Festival

It's been a year since a brutal snow storm hit Metro Vancouver and caused traffic to grind to a halt overnight. People's 30 minute commutes turned into a 12 hour ordeal. We'll hear ideas on how to prevent this in the future. Next, a strike at Rogers Sugar refinery has some turning to alternative baking methods. Finally, Vancouver International Black Film Festival begins this week.
1/1/150 minutes, 15 seconds
Episode Artwork

COP28 begins in Dubai; Exploring slang words

COP28 begins today in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, we get perspectives from Mary Stuart, organizer, Climate Justice Victoria whose group installed a massive ice sculpture in front of the B.C. legislature today to bring attention to our province's role in climate change. We spoke with a former European Union diplomat and climate policy advisor Radoslav Dimitrov, about his views. He's now a political science professor at Simon Fraser University. Merriam Webster's Word of the Year is "authentic", and in second place is the slang term "Rizz". North by Northwest's Word Guy Jonathan Berkowitz joins us to discuss slang terms in all their glory. And, we hear your low to no-sugar recipes e-mailed to us from yesterday's show.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Weather warnings and grief over the holidays

Environment Canada has issued warnings about heavy rainfall and high ocean levels have been issued for the Saanich Peninsula, the Southern Gulf Islands and parts of Metro Vancouver. We check in on the risks and storm advice with Fraser Valley Current's managing editor Tyler Olsen and with CBC's Climate and Science Specialist Darius Mahdavi. In our second half, our topic is coping with death and grief during the holiday season. We're joined by Margaret Flectcher, registered clinical counsellor with Lumara Counselling and Lisa Hartley, ceremony officiant.
1/1/152 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Soccer great Christine Sinclair retires today; Board games extravaganza

International soccer star, and the pride of Burnaby, Christine Sinclair is retiring from international soccer tonight after her last game. We speak about her future with the Christine Sinclair Foundation with collaborator Andrea Shaw, TTG Canada founder and managing partner. And we explore her legacy with Burnaby Football Club's Kim Bull, senior staff coach, female team; and Madelin Mah, coach and social media manager. In our second segment we celebrate board games with your calls and our guest Bill Heaton, Co-owner of Interactivity Board Game Cafe in Victoria.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Vancouver mayor moves to disband Parks Board; and celebrating the legacy of Norman Lear

Vancouver Mayor Ken Sim announced that he is moving forward with a plan to disband the independently elected Vancouver Parks and Recreation Board. We talk with Vancouver city councillor Pete Fry, and our Municipal Affairs reporter Justin McElroy. In our second half we pay tribute to legacy of American screenwriter and producer Norman Lear. Our listeners share their memories of watching his groundbreaking shows like "All in the Family" and "M.A.S.H." and our guest Toph Marshall, professor at U.B.C.'s Faculty of Arts discusses his legacy and impact on the shows of today.
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Food prices expected to rise even more next year

Canada's Food Price Report 2024 was released today, predicting that food prices will increase by 2.5 - 4% next year, or by $700 for a family of four. One of the study's authors, University of British Columbia's Food and Resource Economics professor Richard Barichello, joins us to discuss. We then hear from CBC Business Reporter Sophia Harris who investigated shrinkflation and found some disturbing examples at Loblaws. In our second half, we talk about strategies for eating healthily with Fatima da Silva, Nourish Cowichan's co-founder and executive director, and Mary L'Abbe, nutritional sciences professor emeritus at the University of Toronto and a director for the World Health Organization on nutrition policy for chronic disease prevention.
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Grocery store digital marketing and Brian Minter

So many of our audience members responded to yesterday's segment on the barriers to grocery stores' specials posed by digital apps and flyers, we begin with your e-mails and calls. We discussed the issue with our guest Andrew Sixsmith, Simon Fraser University gerentology professor and the Science and Technology for Aging Research (STAR) Institute Director. In our second half, we take your gardening questions for our gardening columnist Brian Minter.
1/1/152 minutes, 41 seconds
Episode Artwork

Ottawa releases new dental care plan; What are your favourite winder outdoor activities?

The federal government has announced details of its national dental care plan, the $13 billion insurance plan will prioritize kids and seniors. What else do you want to see?; Next, B.C. is a haven for outdoor enthusiasts, even in the winter. What are your favourite cold weather sports?
1/1/149 minutes, 58 seconds
Episode Artwork

How to navigate negative customers during the holidays; What's your favourite crossword or word puzzle?

Some businesses report increased aggressive behaviour from customers during the holiday season. We're asking, is the customer always right? Next, what's your favourite crossword or word puzzle?
1/1/150 minutes, 19 seconds
Episode Artwork

Canada votes in the UN for a ceasefire in Israel-Hamas war; Does perception of crime match the reality?; Remembering Andre Braugher

We start with Canada's vote supporting a UN General Assembly call for a ceasefire in the Israel-Hamas war. Will this make a difference in the conflict? Next, crime has been one of the biggest stories of the year. Does reality match the perception?; Finally, beloved actor Andre Braugher, known as Captain Raymond Holt in 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine,' has died at the age of 61. We hear about his legacy
1/1/150 minutes, 8 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Coroners Service issues warning on illicit drugs; Luongo honoured by Canucks; Housing density and affordability

We start with a public warning issued by the BC Coroners Service after a recent rise in toxic drug deaths. Next, former Canucks goalie is being honoured by the Vancouver team tonight, and is being inducted into the Ring of Honour. In our second half we talk about the B.C. government's attempts to solve the housing crisis...does densification lead to affordability?
1/1/150 minutes, 26 seconds
Episode Artwork

What's bringing you joy this holiday season?; Do you dress up your pets for the holidays?

The holidays are right around the corner, and despite all the cheer going around, it has still been a long and difficult year for some. We're asking what are the little things that are bringing you joy? Next, it's our regular pet column. We want to know if you dress your animal up, and how to make sure they're enjoying it too.
1/1/150 minutes, 20 seconds
Episode Artwork

How to avoid travel chaos; What are your favourite Christmas movies?

First we hear from a driving instructor and airline travel consultant on tips to avoid holiday travel mishaps this year. Next, what are the holiday movies you watch every year? We talk about all the Christmas classics, and why they never get old.
1/1/150 minutes, 7 seconds
Episode Artwork

New federal targets on electric vehicle sales; What's your favourite booke you received as a gift?

Ottawa has set new targets to increase electric vehicle sales in Canada. Are they realistic? Next, we hear all about the best books to give - and receive - as gifts.
1/1/150 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

What's the future of Canada-India relations?; What's the best gift you've given or received?

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says there's been a "tonal shift" from Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi since the U.S. reported an alleged murder plot. What's next for international relations? Next, we talk about the art of making and choosing gifts. What's the best gift you've given or received?
1/1/150 minutes, 8 seconds
Episode Artwork

Why are so many British Columbians moving to Alberta?; Holiday baking

New Statistics Canada numbers are out - and they show B.C. has had a migration loss to other provinces. In particular to Alberta. We dig into that story. Next, A B.C. MP is taking a 45-hundred km train ride home to Smithers, we'll find out why. Finally, What's baked good is the go-to in your family?
1/1/150 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Christmas Card on the Air

Our listeners send holiday greetings to loved ones and strangers around the province--and around the world.
1/1/152 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

Food waste solutions for the food chain; and finding your joy after retirement

Award-winning entrepreneur and FoodMesh's CEO and co-founder Jessica Regan shares how companies can make a significant difference in reducing food waste while contributing to food security. In the second half, CBC journalist Cathy Browne talks about her documentary "Better Late" where she explores emerging trends in senior culture: https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-141-cbc-radio-specials/clip/16031825-better-late
1/1/152 minutes, 22 seconds
Episode Artwork

Celebrating B.C.'s heroes

We meet exceptional British Columbians making the world a better place. Candace Knoll, Jr. Black Achievement Society president, tells us what motivates her with her work. Former CFL player and current coach and manager of Game Ready Fitness Will Loftus joins us to tell us about his work as a coach, mentor and volunteer. And trailblazer musician Lee Aaron has a fascinating conversation with guest host Amy Bell about her journey through the male-dominated rock music world of the 1980's and 1990's--inspiring other musicians and blazing a new path for herself in today's music environment.
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Highlights of 2023 and journaling

In our final show of 2023, guest host Amy Bell and The Early Edition's director Laurence Watt review some of the tops stories from 2023. In our second half Amy talks with happiness consultant and East Kootenay Caregiver Netword facilitator Marianne Agnew Whitehouse about the practice of journaling. And we're end the show with our CBC News social media editor Maurice Katz as he outlines the top ranked memes of 2023.
1/1/152 minutes, 39 seconds
Episode Artwork

New year's financial outlook and how to "Let it Go" with author Charlene Knight

In our first half, guest host Dan Burritt talks about personal finance with Mark Kalinowski, financial educator, Credit Counselling Society in Calgary and Mark Ting, On the Coast's financial columnist and partner with Foundation Wealth. In our second half, award-winning B.C. author Chelene Knight joins us to talk about her new book "Let it Go: Free Yourself from Old Beliefs and Find a New Path to Joy", and how to make resolutions that will bring more joy to your life.
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. property assessment and homeowner rebate; And our historic bridges, ferries and tunnels

It's time for B.C.'s 2024 property assessment, our CBC Vancouver Municipal Affairs Reporter Justin McElroy takes us through the highlights with guest host Amy Bell. Then Michael Geller, SFU Centre for Sustainable Development adjunct professor and principal with The Geller Group takes on the provincial homeowner rebate. In our second half, author Derek Hayes tells us about his book "Incredible Crossings: The History and Art of the Bridges, Tunnels and Inland Ferries that Connect British Columbia".
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Mid-winter check-in on precipitation; Tips for decluttering to start off the new year

Drought levels and low snow pack are concerning many areas of the province this year. We check in with our CBC Nanaimo reporter Claire Palmer on Mount Washington on snow conditions there, and hear from McBride Mayor Gene Runtz on what the village is facing with level 5 drought conditions. In our second hour, professional organizer Linda Chu, Out of Chaos, gives us tips for decluttering, and we get some great suggestions from our audience as well.
1/1/152 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

Slower holiday season for restaurants; and Minter Friday with your gardening questions

Sommelier Shiva Reddy (and On the Coast's food and wine columnist) joined us to talk about a popular Reddit thread by restaurant workers--and customers--about a slower than normal holiday season for some restaurants. In our second half, master gardener Brian Minter takes your questions about overwintering amaryllis, dealing with blight and grubs, and much more.
1/1/152 minutes, 31 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. braces for wintry spell | What to know about mortgages in 2024

Much of B.C. is bracing for snow, rain and strong winds today and tomorrow. We hear from CBC Reporter Joel Ballard at Simon Fraser University on Burnaby Mountain; check in on winter driving with Mitch Verge, Skaha Ford's service manager in Penticton; and get a weather update from CBC Vancouver's Climate and science specialist Darius Mahdavi. In our second segment we get a different forecast, that of interest rates and mortgages in 2024. We speak with Desjardins's Chief Economist and Strategist Jimmy Jean, and mortgage professional Katy Mackenzie with The Mortgage Group.
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Storm affects travel and power | Province updates cervical cancer screening

The wild winter weather continues to impact the province. BC Ferries had to cancel at least one sailing due to high winds, and numerous outages on Vancouver Island, the Lower Mainland and the Sunshine Coast due to the storm had B.C. Hydro crews busy. But the skiers were happy with the new snow according to our guest Tuppy Hoehn, head coaching team, Caledonia Nordic Ski Club. In our second segment, our guest Peter Milobar, B.C. United MLA for Kamloops-North Thompson, outlines his concern with cancer care in B.C. And we explore the announcement of a new cervical cancer screening process in B.C. with family doctor Dr. Maryam Zeineddin, Ambleside Medical Care.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Call for more Metro Vancouver transit funds | How to handle traumatic news events

Metro Vancouver mayors are hoping to build support for a new campaign that calls for increased transit funding. Chair of the Mayors' Council for Regional Transportation, and Mayor of Port Coquitlam Brad West joins Michelle to talk about their request for public support. In our second half, we speak with Chief Jason Brolund, West Kelowna Fire Rescue, and Dr. Jillian Roberts; registered psychologist and author, about how to process difficult and traumatic stories that are in the news.
1/1/152 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

Coastal B.C. set for Arctic blast | Do you plan to cut your phone use in 2024?

Coastal B.C. is set for an Arctic blast, with outflow winds forecast to make temperatures feel as low as –30 Celsius. We check in with CBC reporters Andrew Kurjata in Prince George and Joel Ballard in New Westminster. Brian Twaites, paramedic public information officer with B.C. Emergency Health Services chats with Michelle about how to keep safe during extreme cold. In our second half, B.C. United's leader has called for a ban on cellphone use in classrooms. We speak with CBC technology columnist Manjula Selvarajah and take your thoughtful calls on the subject.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

How to protect your home, car and pets from the cold

We cover the deep freeze that has settled across B.C. Brent Watson, Vision Heating Plumbing and Cooling owner gives advice to avoid damage to your home. Leah Gillanders, owner of Leah's Automotive answers your cold weather automotive questions. Dewdney Animal Hospital's Dr. Adrian Walton explains how to keep your pets safe and warm.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Record cold in B.C. | CEBA repayment deadline | Cutting personal carbon emissions

We start off the show with CBC's Climate and Science Specialist Darius Mahdavi who gives us an early look at the heavy snow forecast for some parts of B.C. as record cold continues to grip other regions. In our second story, we check in with Dan Kelly, president and chief operating officer of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business as the clock ticks down to the Jan. 18th CEBA deadline. And in our third segment, Canada Research Chair and UBC behavioural scientist Jiaying Zhao leads us on a riveting discussion on happy climate hacks to make our world a better place.
1/1/152 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

Snowfall warnings across most of province | Oak Bay grapples with housing mandate

CBC Science and Climate Specialist Darius Mahdavi brings us the latest weather forecast as most of B.C. comes under a snowfall warning, with up to 20 cm expected in southern areas. Darren Miller, owner of Insurance Restoration Pro gives us tips on avoiding water damage from burst pipes. We check in with the provincial Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure's Janelle Staite, deputy regional director, South Coast division on preparations for roads and highways in advance of the stormy weather. CBC reporter Belle Puri brings us the story of the community of Oak Bay grappling with the provincial mandate to add 664 new housing units by 2028. And, we talk about the challenges of multi-unit housing with Eric Protzer Senior Research Fellow, Growth Lab, at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government.
1/1/152 minutes, 43 seconds
Episode Artwork

Snow blankets southwest B.C. | How vandalism affects small businesses

Many schools closed, commute slow as snow blankets southwest B.C. We check in with CBC reporters Baneet Braich in Abbotsford, Janella Hamilton in Surrey and our Science and Climate Specialist Darius Mahdavi. In our second half, we explore the impact on communities with more reports of vandalism and break-ins. Township of Langley Mayor Eric Woodward joins us to discuss his community's approach, and UBC Okanagan sociology professor Bonar Buffam talks about the roots of crime and different ways to deal with it.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today, Jan. 18: Second snow day for many schools | What's needed to fix Ministry of Child and Family Development?

Snow day 2.0: Classes cancelled again in southwest B.C. as more snow, freezing rain approaches. We check in with design and accessibility consultant Tanelle Bolt on how snow and ice on sidewalks affect people with mobility issues. We're joined by Surrey School District spokesperson Ritinder Matthew on the decision to close schools for the second day in a row this week. And in our second half, we ask what needs to change at the Ministry of Children and Family Development? Our guests are Mary TeeGee, chair of the Indigenous Child and Family Services Directors Forum, and Gordie Hogg, former Minister of Children and Family Development.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Should cities invest more in snow response? | Caring for plants in the snow

From street clearing to public transit, is it time for the province and municipalities to invest more in their response to snow? We speak with UBC Okanagan engineering professor Gordon Lovegrove about that very issue. We are also joined by New Westminster councillor Daniel Fontaine who, along with Surrey city councillor Linda Annis, is calling on Metro Vancouver and the province to hold a snow summit. In our second week, gardening columnist Brian Minter answers your questions and explains how to care for plants during cold weather
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Metro Vancouver bus strike | 2-year cap on student permits | Cycling vacations

Our CBC reporter Michelle Ghoussoub updates us as buses halted in Metro Vancouver as transit workers go on strike. As the federal government announces 2-year cap on student permits, we are joined by provincial Minister of Post Secondary Education Selina Robinson, and Simon Fraser University School of Public Policy's assistant professor on race and equity Ali Bhagat. And, Vancouver tour operator Robbin Mckinney shares tips for travelling the world by bike.
1/1/152 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Heli-skiing crash | Transit strike explained | Cost of depression treatment

The latest on the heli-skiing crash north of Terrace, we speak with aviation safety expert John Gradek, lecturer and the coordinator of the Aviation Management Program at McGill University. Our CBC Vancouver Municipal Affairs Reporter Justin McElroy explains what's behind the transit strike in Metro Vancouver. And we chat with Sonya Cressman, adjunct professor with Simon Fraser University's Faculty of Health Sciences about her research into the cost of getting treatment for depression, and take your thoughtful calls on the subject.
1/1/152 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

2023 drug deaths report published | Working multiple jobs to make ends meet

We cover Lisa Lapointe B.C.'s Chief Coroner's update on the number of deaths from unregulated drugs in 2023, with at least 2,511 lives lost, the highest number ever recorded. In our second segment, we're joined by CBC journalist Sarah Antle from St. John's, Nfld, whose series "The Grind" tells the stories of people who have to work multiple jobs. As British Columbians struggle with high costs, we also talk with Sylvia Fuller, professor of sociology at UBC about what we're facing in this province. And our callers let us know how they are being impacted.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Next steps in tackling drug crisis | Heli-skiing industry association says safety is paramount | Let kids take risks, pediatricians say

B.C. is marking another grim milestone with a record number of deaths from unregulated drugs in 2023. Sarah Blyth, Executive Director of the Overdose Prevention Society in Vancouver. We'll discuss what direction the province needs to take in 2024. Ross Cloutier, Executive Director, HeliCat Canada, speaks with us about what the heli-skiing industry is feeling after the deadly crash north of Terrace on Monday, Jan. 23. He also talks about the measures the industry takes to ensure safety. And we were joined by Dr. Mariana Brussoni, professor and director of Human Early Learning Partnership with UBC's faculty of medicine to talk about how to mitigate risks in play and get more kids outdoors. Pediatricians say it's time to pop the bubble wrap and let kids play outdoors. We'll hear from parents on our open line.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Protecting kids from online harm | UN court rules on Israel | Pet care Q&A

B.C. Premier David Eby introduces three initiatives to keep children safe on-line. Our guest Kristen Thomasen, UBC law professor at UBC with an expertise in AI and law takes us through the changes. UN court stops short of ordering ceasefire in Gaza, but rules Israel must take measures to prevent genocide. And veterinarian Dr. Lauren Adelman answers your pet care questions.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Rainfall update | Should schools ban cellphones? | Low-cost workouts

Heavy rain is expected to return across parts of B.C.on Monday and continue through Thursday. CBC reporter Michelle Gomez takes us to the Sumas Prairie, and our science and climate specialist Darius Mahdavi gives us an update on where we are, and what to expect. B.C. is looking to ban cellphones in schools in September. Prince George District Teachers Federation President Daryl Beauregard joins us to discuss the pro's and con's of this decision. And, CBC business columnist Rubina Ahmed-Haq and JF Esculier, MoveMed psysiotherapist chat with us on how to work out on a budget.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

High avalanche risk | More on the international student cap | Honey recipes

Heavy rain and warm air raises avalanche risk in B.C. We speak with Tyson Rettie, Avalanche Canada avalanche forecaster, and Sandra Riches, executive director, BC AdventureSmart about how to stay safe in the beautiful outdoors. B.C. is cracking down on private colleges after Ottawa announced a cap on international student permits, we talk with Jindi Singh, National Director of Khalsa Aid Canada and Michel Turcotte, executive director, Camosun College Student Society to understand how international students are feeling. And for our last half hour, Chef Ned Bell joins us to talk about cooking with honey after Creston apiary Honey Bee Zen wins big in the American Honey Show in New Orleans.
1/1/152 minutes, 49 seconds
Episode Artwork

New rental support for B.C. | Heli-skiing safety | More on intimate images act

The province announces new funding for the B.C. rent bank, we take your calls on if it's enough support. The Helicopter Association of Canada's president and CEO Trevor Mitchell joins us for a follow-up on the Jan. 22nd heli-skiing crash near Terrace. And, as B.C.'s Intimate Images Act is law this week, we are joined by data privacy and cybersecurity lawyer, Claire Feltrin, from Deloitte Legal Canada to discuss what parents, educators and social media do to prevent abuse of youth?
1/1/152 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

Apology to Doukhobors | Poll shows Canadians fear job loss | Safer supply update

CBC's Brady Strachan gives us an overview of what to expect today when B.C.'s Attorney General makes a formal apology today. She's apologizing on behalf of the provincial government to the Sons of Freedom, part of the Doukhobor community, whose children were taken from them in the 1950's as punishment. A new Angus Reid poll has found half of Canadians under 55 fear losing their jobs. Angus Reid research associate Jon Roe joins us to look at how people are feeling. And finally, we cover the update on the prescribed safe supply program with Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, Dr. Alexis Crabtree, BC Centre for Disease Control; and Dr. Alice Virani, Provincial Health Services Authority.
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Doukhobor survivor responds to B.C. apology | Safer supply | Brian Minter

We hear from Elizabeth Hlookoff, author, and one of the hundreds of Doukhobor children forcibly removed from their homes by the B.C. government in the 1950s. She tells us about her experience in the New Denver School, the impact it had on her life, and responds to hearing an official apology from the province. We hear from Guy Felicella, peer clinical adviser at the B-C Centre on Substance Use on the provincial health officer's report on safer supply. And, it's Brian Minter Friday! We take all of your gardening questions.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Trans Mountain pipeline sale | Rural homelessness in B.C.

The long-promised sale of the troubled TMX pipeline project could prove difficult for Ottawa. We get a report from CBC business reporter Kyle Bakx, and hear from our audience on the project and its $34 billion price tag.Then we hear about a new 3-year study looking at the impact of homelessness in Castlegar, Trail and Nelson from project manager and researcher Jayme Jones, Selkirk Innovates, Selkirk College.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Minister under fire for comments about Middle East | Are you trying Dry February?

Minister under fire for comments about Middle East Haroon Khan, Director, Al Masjid Al Jamia mosque, Stewart Prest, lecturer in political science, UBC. Our panel of experts discuss Dry February: Tim Naimi, director of the University of Victoria’s Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research; Ciana Van Dusen from the Canadian Cancer Society, and Racquel Foran, co-owner of Booze Free Bevvies in Port Coquitlam.
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Reaction to Selina Robinson stepping down | How romance scammers trick victims

Our guests Ezra Shanken, CEO of the Jewish Federation of Vancouver, and Rabbi Dan Moscovitz, Senior Rabbi of Temple Sholom in Vancouver share their views on NDP MLA Selina Robinson stepping down as B.C. cabinet minister over comments on the Middle East. Then, we speak with CBC Go Public reporter Erica Johnson, and Neesha Hoti, Better Business Bureau's director of marketing and communications discuss romance scammers. Erica Johnson called out a scammer and ended up getting an insightful interview about his motives.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today, Feb. 7: How to talk to kids about online safety | Celebrating Black Canadian authors

After charges were laid against a man in Nigeria over the death of a Surrey teenager in a case of sextortion, we discuss the disturbing trend and how to protect children online with our guests Jesse Miller, founder of Mediated Reality, and registered clinical counsellor Jennifer Hollinshead. We celebrate Black History Month with celebrated author Tea Mutonji, whose book "Shut Up, You're Pretty" is a finalist for Canada Reads this year, and CBC journalist Matt Allen who was the guest host of a special screening of CBC documentary series "Black Life, Untold Stories."
1/1/152 minutes, 44 seconds
Episode Artwork

Premier slams Bell Media cuts | Low snowpacks | CBC pottery series debuts

- Premier David Eby has criticized Bell Media's parent company after another round of layoffs, the sale of 45 radio stations and planned cuts to CTV News and Bloomberg. We speak with Barry Link, chair of Langara's journalism program about the impact this will have on local journalism. CBC's science specialist Darius Mahdavi gives us an update on the province's snowpacks. Reports show that every basin is well below its seasonal average. And, we meet Emily Carr University faculty and artist Brendan Tang, one of the judges on The Great Canadian Pottery Throw Down: https://gem.cbc.ca/the-great-canadian-pottery-throw-down.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Sparse snowpack fuels drought fears | Lunar New Year | The role of assistance dogs

Sparse snowpack levels across B.C. are raising fears of severe drought this year. We speak with B.C.'s Minister of Land, Water, and Resource Stewardship Nathan Cullen, Regional Chief Terry Teegee, B.C. Assembly of First Nations, and Erica Gies, author of "Water Always Wins", independent journalist and National Geographic Explorer. We meet Charlie, an assistance dog in training, and talk with Pacific Assistance Dogs Society's Tara Doherty, Director of Communications, about how certified assistance dogs provide support to people with disabilities.
1/1/152 minutes, 12 seconds
Episode Artwork

Plan to build more rental homes for middle-income residents | Men's mental health

The province has unveiled its latest plan under the B.C. Builds program, which will see hundreds of rental homes built and provided to middle-income earners. Our guest Stephanie Allen, principal with Adinkra Strategies, and housing and community development consultant, gives us her evaluation of the program. Men make up the majority of toxic-drug deaths. What's needed to support men struggling with mental health and addiction? We speak with Kurt Kashuba, Carpenters Regional Council and Dr. John Ogrodniczuk, UBC psychiatry professor and founder of HeadsUp Guys.
1/1/152 minutes, 43 seconds
Episode Artwork

$733M agreement for seniors' care | Teaching young athletes about consent

B.C.Health Minister Adrian Dix and federal Health Minister Mark Holland announced a $733 million agreement for seniors health are. We review the agreement with Isobel Mackenzie, B.C.'s seniors' advocate. We get an update from CBC news reporter Chad Pawson on Richmond city council's vote tonight on a plan for a supervised consumption site. And, our guests Ninu Kang, executive director, Ending Violence BC, and Jamie Taras, Director Community Partnerships for the BC Lions Football Club discuss teaching young sports stars about respect and consent.
1/1/152 minutes, 34 seconds
Episode Artwork

Richmond drug consumption site | Making Valentine's dinner

Richmond city council motion over a supervised consumption site causes confusion and commotion. Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie joins us for an update. Chef Dez gives us tips for preparing a romantic Valentine's Day dinner.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today, Feb. 15: New funding to address family violence | Celebrating Black-owned businesses

B.C. Attorney General Niki Sharma joins us to announce new funding of $29.1 million over 3 years to expand access to legal aid services for people experiencing family violence. We also talk with Kim Hawkins, executive director of Rise Women's Legal Centre to talk about the impact of this funded and what more is needed. And, we talk about how to support Black-owned businesses and entrepreneurs with Candace Lauren, Black Entrepreneurs and Businesses of Canada Society, and entrepreneur Deress Asghedom.
1/1/152 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

Police officer's role dooms charges in $30M drug bust | Brian Minter Friday

A massive drug case in Victoria has collapsed, with a B.C. Supreme Court judgement claiming Victoria police officers misled prosecutors and defence lawyers. Our guest Wade Deisman, criminology professor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, walks us through the fallout, and how this impacts public confidence and police morale. And, it's Minter Friday! BC Today's gardening columnist, Brian Minter, takes your questions on pruning, insects and moss.
1/1/152 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

Renters report lower quality of life, report finds | Budgeting as a couple

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Premier David Eby announced new federal funding of $2 billion for new housing in B.C. We hear from Thom Armstrong, CEO, Co-operative Housing Federation of BC about the announcement. Then, we have Murray Baker; Financial Empowerment Manager, from Family Services of Greater Vancouver to discuss a recent Statistics Canada report that renters report a lower quality of life than homeowners; We talk about budgeting and talking about money in a relationship with digital content creators Steph Gordon and Den Mathu (Steph & Dev).
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Is B.C.'s wine industry in trouble? | For Better or For Worse author's new book

Uncorking the B.C.-Alberta wine wars: Okanagan Wine Club manager Lindsay Kaisaris joins us to discuss how smaller wineries are caught in the middle between the provinces' latest skirmishes. In our second half, we speak with ground-breaking cartoonist and writer Lynn Johnston about her celebrated "For Better or For Worse" syndicated comic strip and how she created a new universe with Alottabots for her new children's book series.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Budget day special: province projects record-high $7.9 billion deficit

An extended edition of BC Today will bring you full coverage of the 2024 provincial budget announcement in Victoria. Join host Michelle Eliot as we hear from stakeholders and callers from across the province on what their priorities are. After Finance Minister Katrine Conroy presents the budget, Michelle Eliot will be joined by panelists Mo Amir, podcast host of This is Vancolour, and Gerald Baier, a UBC political scientist to break it all down. We'll hear what the priorities are: from healthcare, housing, climate chage, affordability and more.
1/1/11 hour, 51 minutes, 13 seconds
Episode Artwork

How costly is it to travel within Canada? | Dealing with the price of pet care

Budget airline Lynx Air is ceasing operations. With few long-distance alternatives to flying, how costly is it to travel within Canada? Our guest Mckenzie McMillan, The Travel Group travel consultant, walks us through why Canada is so challenging for budget airlines. In our pet segment, we explore the cost of keeping pets healthy with Kathy Powelson, PAWS for Hope BC executive director.
1/1/152 minutes, 39 seconds
Episode Artwork

Flipping-tax legislation coming in spring | Child poverty rate increasing: report

Province says home-flipping tax legislation will be introduced this spring. Our guests Brendon Ogmundson, Chief Economist, BC Real Estate Association, and David Hutniak, CEO, Landlord BC, talk about the impact this may have on creating more affordable housing. Child poverty rates are increasing in B.C., our guest Adrienne Montani, the First Call Child and Youth Advocacy Society discusses their new report..
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Vancouver report warns 4,700 could be homeless | Protecting kids from online harm

A new report by the Carnegie Housing Project says up to 1,500 more shelter beds are needed in Vancouver to address shortfalls and prevent the number of homeless people from increasing. Carnegie Housing Project manager Devin O'Leary tells us more about their recommendations. https://www.carnegiehousingproject.ca/And, as the federal government unveils its online harms bill, Tiana Sharifi, the CEO of the Exploitation Education Institute joins us to answer questions from parents and caregivers about keeping kids safe online. https://www.exploitationeducation.org/free-resources
1/1/152 minutes, 49 seconds
Episode Artwork

Impact of comedy show's mocking of victims of Robert Pickton

The fallout continues after Alberta comedy act Danger Cats took their Robert Pickton t-shirts off their sales website and cancelled their upcoming appearances in Alberta, Texas and in New Westminster at Rick Bronson's House of Comedy BC. The t-shirt mocked victims of serial killer Robert Pickton, and their set included disparaging remarks about residential school survivors. Our guests today included New Westminster city councillor Daniel Fontaine with a reaction from his community, and Sue Brown, director and lawyer for Justice for Girls. Our thanks to our audience for their thoughtful and insightful calls, emails and texts about the topic.
1/1/152 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

Ottawa unveils national pharmacare plan; IVF coverage coming to B.C.

Federal Health Minister Mark Holland has released the long-awaited details for a national pharmacare plan. We talk to a family physician who thinks the legislation doesn't go far enough. Next, amid an increase in demand for IVF treatment, the province will soon pay for one round of treatment. We hear why this is important to people in B.C.
1/1/150 minutes, 6 seconds
Episode Artwork

Your memories of Brian Mulroney; Brian Minter Friday

Brian Mulroney, one of Canda's most consequential prime ministers, has died at the age of 84. We hear your memories of the political icon, including one listener who received an unexpected letter. Next, Brian Minter joins us to take your gardening questions.
1/1/149 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

Some municipalities push back against short-term rental rules; Would you split the cost of a home with friends or family?

The principal residence requirement for short-term rentals comes into effect May 1, limiting them to homeowner's principal residence plus one secondary suite or accessory dwelling unit. But some municipalities say the new rules won't work for their cities. Next, we talk about alternative ways to own a home, including splitting the cost with friends or family. Is this a good option?
1/1/151 minutes, 5 seconds
Episode Artwork

It's Super Tuesday, a critical day in U.S. politics; Has the province made enough progress on $10-a-day childcare?

It's Super Tuesday, a critical day in U.S. politics. And the election in November is shaping up to be a Biden-Trump rematch. How are you feeling about politics south of the border? How will the election impact Canadians? Next, the provincial government is facing criticism over a lack of progress on $10-a-day childcare, should this be an election issue?
1/1/149 minutes, 8 seconds
Episode Artwork

Outrage follows revalations over affordable housing program abuse;

People and politicians across B.C. are expressing outrage following revelations Tuesday that at least 13 people allegedly lied to access below-market price units in Victoria. We hear your reactions to this story and ask how the province can avoid this situation in the future. Next, another local council in B.C. has been mired in public divisiveness. Why do we seem to keep seeing this at a local level?
1/1/149 minutes, 29 seconds
Episode Artwork

Selina Robinson on why she's leaving the NDP caucus; The push to get more women in the trades

Selina Robinson has left the B.C. NDP, citing antisemitism among some of its members. The former cabinet minister says she felt unsupported as a Jewish woman in the governing party. She joins us to explain her experience. And we talk with a political scientist about the role of international events in local politics. Next, ahead of International Women's Day we hear about the pusyh get get more women in the trades.
1/1/149 minutes, 44 seconds
Episode Artwork

On International Women's Day, what does feminism mean to you?; What's your all-time favourite Oscar-winning movie?

It's International Women's Day across the globe, we ask what being a feminist means to you, and what work we still need to do in B.C. to achieve gender equity. Next, it's Oscar weekend! We hear about the current favourites to win, and take your calls on the best Oscar winning or nominated flims of all time.
1/1/149 minutes, 13 seconds
Episode Artwork

Safer supply and the drug trade | Why do we still have daylight time?

Safe supply is under criticism after police in Prince George make a major drug bust that included unknown quantities of safe supply. We speak with Juls Budau, former frontline worker and OPS manager in Prince George, and B.C. United MLA Elenore Sturko, shadow critic Mental Health and Addictions. And, it's the first workday after the switch to daylight savings time. We're joined by CBC journalist Nicole Oud, and Adela Tsuen, owner of sleepy baby coach about the impacts.
1/1/152 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

How have recent temperatures affected you? | U.S. considers another TikTok ban

From ski hills to Okanagan fruit farms, people have been feeling the effects of this winter's unseasonably warm climate. Sukhpaul Bal, B.C. Cherry Association president, and Brian Thomas, B.C. Cattlemen's Association president, give guest host Dan Burritt an overview of how producers are doing as we transition to spring. Then, the U.S. is considering another TikTok ban. Jesse Miller, founder of Mediated Reality, breaks down the controversy and how it may impact Canadians.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Should B.C. keep gifted-student programs? | First steps in pharmacare plan

Parents in Vancouver are protesting the suspension of an early entry university program for gifted students. We speak with a graduate of the program, Rachel Lin, who is now a PhD candidate with UBC's department of educational and counselling psychology, and Paul Shaker, SFU professor emeritus and former dean of Education. Our callers make the arguments that these programs are important in B.C. schools. Then, our guests Diabetes B.C. Medical Director Dr. Tom Elliott, and Michelle Hewitt, Chair, of Disability without Poverty discuss Ottawa's first steps in a national pharmacare program would cover contraception and diabetes.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Backlogs in breast cancer screening | Varying views on short-term rental rules

CBC Reporter Michell Ghoussoub brings us the latest on B.C.'s breast cancer screening system challenges. Our guest Dr. Paula Gordon, Clinical professor, UBC Radiology department; and Dense Breasts Canada Medical Advisor, talks about the systemic issues causing delays. And, as cities and towns contemplate their response to new provincial short-term rental rules, we speak with short-term rental owner Julia Payne, and Doug King, Together Against Poverty Society executive director.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Your favourite spring break memories | Spring gardening with Brian Minter

Students across B.C. are celebrating two weeks of spring break. We want to know what your plans are and what your favourite spring break memories are. Margaret Gallagher, host of CBC's North by Northwest, joins us from Powell River as she takes her show on the road for a special broadcast.Next, BC Today gardening columnist Brian Minter joins us to talk about spring planting ahead of the warm weather and answers your questions.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Top issues in B.C. this election year | Online video-game safety

The B.C. NDP is still the top choice ahead of the provincial election in October, despite some heavy criticism, according to a new Angus Reid Institute poll. Shachi Kurl, Angus Reid Institute's president, joins us to discuss. And, following recent provincial legislation that aims to protect young people from online harms, we discuss the risks involved in online video games with guest Tiana Sharifi; CEO, Exploitation Education Institute, and talk about their new educational platform: https://www.thepreventionproject.ca/.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today, March. 19: Preparing for drought and wildfire season | Favourite spots on Vancouver Island

It's the first day of spring, and while some people are enjoying the sunshine, government officials are already planning for the upcoming drought and wildfire season. Our guests are Kai Chen, UBC professor with the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, and Andréanne Doyon, associate professor and director of SFU's Resource and Environmental Management Planning Program.CBC's new podcast, This is Vancouver Island, is all about the joys, quirks and frustrations of Island life. Host Kathryn Marlow joins us to talk about all things Vancouver Island.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

More EV charging stations | World Happiness Report | Decluttering and heirlooms

B.C. aims to add 500 public charging stations to the province's electric highway. Margareta Dovgal, energy and climate analyst breaks it down with us. The 2024 World Happiness Report is out, and happiness is trending down in the West — especially for young people. The report's co-editor, John Helliwell, professor emeritus, UBC's Vancouver School of Economics joins us to discuss this year's report. And, Linda Chu, professional organizer, Out of Chaos, discusses spring cleaning and family heirlooms.
1/1/152 minutes, 31 seconds
Episode Artwork

Are pensions keeping up with the cost of living? | World Down Syndrome Day

Seniors are rallying in several communities across B.C. to bring attention to what they call 'shrinking' pensions that are not keeping pace with inflation and the rising cost of living. CBC reporter Michelle Gomez reports from the rally in White Rock, and we heard from Ramona Kaptyn, BC's chief advocacy and communications officer for the Canadian Association of Retired Persons (CARP). And, on U.N.'s World Down Syndrome Day, Canadian actress Madison Tevlin talks about starring in the international campaign challenging stereotypes that create barriers. We were also joined by Tamara Taggart, president of Down Syndrome B.C. to talk about the significance of this day and the work needed to recognize the abilities of people with Down Syndrome.
1/1/151 minutes, 19 seconds
Episode Artwork

On World Water Day, what does water access mean to you? | Travelling with pets

It's World Water Day. As we hear about threats to our water systems from climate change, Dave Zehnder, Kootenay-area rancher and Kat Hartwig, Living Lakes Canada Executive Director. In our regular pet segment, we're joined by Sarah Shapiro-Ward, professional dog trainer with When Hounds Fly to talk about travelling with your pet.
1/1/153 minutes, 19 seconds
Episode Artwork

CRAB Park update | 2024 Junos | Call in with your best 'fun facts'

Our CBC reporter Jon Hernandez reports on the Vancouver Park Board's attempt today to temporarily move at the city’s CRAB Park to temporarily move ahead of a cleanup. After the 2024 Junos last night, we're talk about all the best moments with the Snotty Nose Rez Kids' Darren "Young D" Metz and singer-songwriter Dan Mangan. And, CBC's Climate and Science Specialist Darius Mahdavi shares fun facts from the animal, science and astronomy world.
1/1/152 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Baltimore bridge collapse | What are the struggles and successes of B.C. youth?

Baltimore's Key Bridge collapsed in Baltimore, we get the latest update. The B.C. Adolescent Health Survey has been conducted every five years for the last three decades. The 2023 report was released, we discuss with McCreary Centre Society's executive director Annie Smith, and with clinical counsellor Lawrence Sheppard, regular mental health columnist with The Early Edition.
1/1/152 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

Be 'bear aware' this year | Is there a health-care worker you'd like to thank?

Bears are starting to emerge from their dens as we move into spring. We hear your bear stories, and talk with Gabriela De Romeri, WildSafe BC communications coordinator to give us some tips on co-existing with our bear neighbours. And, we bring you the heart-warming story of Erica Staving from Kelowna, who recently underwent emergency surgery. She wrote to CBC about how she wants to thank her neurosurgeon, Dr. Michael Tso, and other Kelowna General Hospital staff so we reunited them on the program. And we received an overwhelming number of calls and e-mails from people wanting to thank their doctors, nurses and health care staff. Thank you for sharing your stories with us.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Ottawa's 'renters’ bill of rights' | Ask an astronaut your space questions

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is in Vancouver this week, and he’s promising a ‘renters’ bill of rights.’ We dig into the housing measures and how they will help people in B.C. with guest Rebecca Love, volunteer of Vancouver Tenants Union, and your calls. Canadian astronaut Jeremy Hansen joins us ahead of his 2025 trip to the moon to talk about life as an astronaut and to answer your questions about space.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Province proposes new rental protections | Novel explores life of child with ADHD

The province says new proposals will support renters and landlords who play by the rules. Our CBC provincial affairs reporter Meera Bains gives us an update, and we hear our viewers' experiences. Then, B.C. author Chris Read debuts her new novel, "Queen Jean is in Trouble Again". Set in West Vancouver, the novel explores the life of a fifth grader with ADHD. She is joined by Dr. Gurdeep Parhar, Clinical Professor, UBC Faculty of Medicine and Medical Director of the Adult ADHD Centre to talk about childhood and adult diagnoses.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Taiwan earthquake | Meeting B.C.'s growing energy need | Addiction recovery homes

We speak with Honn Kao, a Victoria-based seismologist who studied in Taiwan shares his perspective and insight into the deadly earthquake that struck the island. And, we get an insider's perspective of a B.C. Hydro announcement about increasing energy supply in the province, our guest is Colleen Giroux-Schmidt, Clean Energy BC's board chair, and VP, Corporate Relations with clean energy company Innergex. Then, Cheryl Diebel, Director, New Roads Therapeutic Recovery Centre, shares how they're helping people accessing addiction treatment in B.C.
1/1/152 minutes, 44 seconds
Episode Artwork

Calls for Quesnel mayor to step down | What is B.C.'s best bird?

Calls are growing louder for the mayor of Quesnel to step down after his wife handed out copies of this controversial book. CBC reporter Betsy Trumpener brings us the latest, and our guest Sean Carleton, Assistant Professor, History and Indigenous Studies at the University of Manitoba, gives us insight into the diffreence between critical dialogue and denialism. Then, we talk about a contest to decide B.C.'s best bird with wildlife conservationist and filmmaker Connel Bradwell and hear our callers' favourites.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Why do people choose to leave B.C.? | Brian Minter takes your gardening questions

68,000 people left B.C. for other provinces last year, with most of them moving to Alberta. Our viewers share why they think that's happening. And, our gardening columnist Brian Minter answers your gardening questions
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

The solar eclipse and live coverage of the moment of totality in Canada

We watch the total solar eclipse unfold live as it tracks across parts of Canada on this special edition of BC Today. Our guests are Aaron and Julian Falkin, father-son duo watching the eclipse in Cleveland, OH, and Joanna Woo, Lecturer, SFU Dept of Physics.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Alleged drug use at hospitals | Being single in B.C.

B.C. United is alleging open drug use and dealing at a Vancouver hospital. But a physician at St. Paul's says that's a "false narrative." Adriane Gear, B.C. Nurses Union president shares her perspective.As the number of single people grows in Canada, Our guests Yuthike Girme, SFU, Associate Professor of Psychology and CBC News TikTok Producer, Ashley Fraser discuss what it's like being single in B.C. with our callers weighing in on the pros and cons.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Stricter rules for tent cities | Civil discourse and polarization

Stricter rules on homeless encampments were passed by the Vancouver Park Board on Monday, despite concerns from advocates. We hear from Vancouver park board commissioner Angela Haer, and hear from callers on how encampments are being handled in their parts of the province. Then 51 prominent Canadians have written an open letter asking political leaders to "address urgently the rise of incivility." Our guests Aftab Erfan, executive director, Morris J Wosk Centre for Dialogue, and Jennie Barron, executive director at the Mir Centre for Peace discuss ways to improve civil discourse.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Surrey rejects $250M for police transition | Eid al-Fitr | Online gambling

As Surrey rejects $250 million from the province to aid the city's police transition, we ask viewers for their advice for Surrey Mayor Brenda Locke and B.C. Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth and get analysis from Hamish Telford, Associate Professor, Political Science, University of the Fraser Valley. The celebration of Eid al-Fitr, marking the end of Ramadan, draws Vancouver's Muslim community to B.C. Place Stadium.And our guests Bryce Taylor, recovering gambling addict, and Adrienne Cossom, Registered Clinical Social Worker with Gambling Support BC, and host of the Fold Em podcast talk about the growth of online gambling — and discuss when a hobby turns into an addiction--and what to do about it.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Killer whale rescue underway | Pet adoption in B.C.

The Ehattesaht First Nation says the rescue of a trapped killer whale calf is underway near Zeballos. We get the latest updates on the operation from CBC reporter , and we hear from Donna Sandstrom, executive director, The Whale Trail; and "Orca Rescue!" author, and Eric Pelkey, heriditary chief of the Tsawout of the WSANEC Nation; and Community Engagement Coordinator with their Leadership Council.We hear how pet adoptions — including so-called foster fails — are a part of life for many families in B.C., with Pamela Saddler, founder of Broken Promises Rescue and Adrienne McBride, Senior Director, Community Animal Centres, BC SPCA.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Sombre 8th anniversary of poisoned drug crisis | TED Talks' 10th anniversary

It's been 8 years since the province declared a public health emergency on the toxic drug supply, and more than 14,000 people have died in the province since it was declared in 2016. We hear from you about how the crisis has impacted you, your loved ones and community. Then, we hear from CBC reporter Chad Pawson from the site of the 10th annniversary TED Talks, and UBC psychology professor Elizabeth Dunn on her massively-viewed TED Talk "Helping others makes us happier--but it matters how we do it."
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

'Generational fairness' in the federal budget | Resiliency for teens

As the federal government prepares for this afternoon's budget, we discuss 'generational fairness' with Sanjay Jeram, senior lecturer in political science at Simon Fraser University. And, ahead of a UBC event on the topic, we speak to pediatrician Dr. Dzung Vo about how teens can develop resiliency and cope with the stressors of the modern world.
1/1/152 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Canada adds more jobs but sees gaps in employment; taking your pet calls; and Beyoncé

Canada's labour market added 40-thousand jobs last month. But there are still gaps in employment. Next, our pets column is back, and today we get advice on how to find the best pet services. Plus, gearing up for the big Beyoncé concert in Vancouver.
48 minutes, 24 seconds
Episode Artwork

The Bank of Canada holds key interest rates; How do you manage day-to-day stress?

No increase to the Bank of Canada's key interest rate today. It's some relief for mortgage holders, but is it enough? Next, we go to the Shuswap where residents are starting their slow return after wildfires tore through the area. Finally, it's back-to-school and back-to-work...how do you manage daily stress?
49 minutes, 37 seconds
Episode Artwork

Conservative Party convention begins today; Are kids sports becoming unaffordable?

The Conservative Party of Canada is leading big in the polls and today, they meet in Quebec for a convention to discuss policies. What do you think of the party's lead? Next, we hear Bank of Canada governor Tiff Macklem take questions from reporters. Finally, we talk all about kids sports, and whether they're becoming unaffordable.
50 minutes, 35 seconds
Episode Artwork

Back-to-school anxiety; Managing AI in schools

First, it's the first day back at school for kids across the province. We'll talk about back-to-school anxieties and about some districts still impacted by wildfire evacuation orders. Next, does artificial intelligence belong in the classroom? How can students and teachers navigate AI?
49 minutes, 55 seconds
Episode Artwork

Why British Columbians are home-sharing; what to know about beekeeping

Today is Overdose Awareness Day. And as British Columbians mourn the loss of more than 1,400 deaths since January, we'll hear from some people about their fight to survive. And on the open line, a new poll suggests co-ownership is growing as Canadians try to overcome high housing prices. We find out about the benefits, and the pitfalls? And later in the show, we learn about the joy, the art, and the science of beekeeping.
49 minutes, 21 seconds
Episode Artwork

Premier calls for halt to interest-rate hikes; your fall gardening questions

Premier David Eby says he needs to speak out on issues that affect British Columbians, and that's why he's written an open letter to the Bank of Canada, urging it to recognize the impact of interest rate hikes, and to hold off. It's prompted a debate about whether he was correct to try to influence the Bank of Canada's rate hike decision next week. And in the second half of our show, fall means renewal and it's time for our gardens to undergo a refresh. Brian Minter joins us with some tips, and to take your questions.
49 minutes, 15 seconds
Episode Artwork

Flood warnings in southeastern B.C.; Back-to-school costs; Foraging

In our first half, wildfire season is still going but now there are warnings of possible flooding in the southeast. And, adding up the costs of back to school shopping. Next, to forage for edible and nutritious plants you may not actually have to go very far...
49 minutes, 35 seconds
Episode Artwork

North Shuswap update; Drake concert unexpectedly cancelled; B.C. teacher shortage

We'll hear from the regional district for the North Shuswap about the difficult road ahead after significant loss of structures. And, fans of Drake had to "just hold on, and go home" last night after his concert was cancelled at the last minute. Next, with back to school right around the corner, how big a problem is the teacher shortage in BC?
49 minutes, 19 seconds
Episode Artwork

Latest on wildfires in B.C.; What are your mortgage questions?

We bring you the latest on the wildfire situation across the province, and talk about what the road ahead looks like for communities in the Central Okanagan and Shuswap. Next, we're joined by a mortgage specialist to talk about how you can manage your money.
50 minutes, 28 seconds
Episode Artwork

Trudeau tours Central Okanagan; what the coming weeks will bring for wildfires

Dan Burritt is our host today. Better news for thousands of people forced from their homes by wildfires in B.C. as evacuation orders are lifting in West Kelowna, Kelowna, and Lake Country. Cooler weather is helping, but thousands of people in the Shuswap area still cannot go home. We get the latest details as of noon PDT on Friday, and bring you the latest from the Prime Minister's visit to wildfire zones. Plus, what is the impact of wildfires on pets and animals? We get expert advice from a veterinarian.
50 minutes, 42 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today Special Programming: BC Wildfires Part One

We hear from officials and experts on the wildfires in British Columbia. In this hour we hear from Fire Ecologist Kira Hoffman and others.
52 minutes, 35 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today Special Programming: Central Okanagan wildfire Part Two

Part One of BC Today special programming with our reporters, callers and local officials updating as the emergency situation unfolds today in the Central Okanagan region. Hosted by CBC's Dan Burritt and Belle Puri.
52 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today Special Programming: Central Okanagan wildfire evacuation Part Three

Part Three of BC Today special programming with our reporters, callers and local officials updating as the emergency situation unfolds today in the Central Okanagan region. Evacuations for West Kelowna, Westbank First Nation and parts of Kelowna, including the Okanagan campus of the University of British Columbia. Hosted by CBC's Lien Yeung.
57 minutes, 29 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today Special Programming: BC Wildfires Part Two

We hear from officials and experts on the wildfires in British Columbia. In this hour we hear from a wine grower impacted by wildfires, and others.
53 minutes, 9 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today Special Programming: Central Okanagan wildfire evacuation Part Two

Part Two of BC Today special programming with our reporters, callers and local officials updating as the emergency situation unfolds today in the Central Okanagan region. Evacuations for West Kelowna, Westbank First Nation and parts of Kelowna, including the Okanagan campus of the University of British Columbia. Hosted by CBC's Lien Yeung.
53 minutes, 57 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today Special Programming: Central Okanagan wildfire Part One

Part One of BC Today special programming with our reporters, callers and local officials updating as the emergency situation unfolds today in the Central Okanagan region. In part one, we broadcast the Province's press conference on wildfires across BC. Hosted by CBC's Dan Burritt and Belle Puri.
54 minutes, 4 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today Special Programming: Central Okanagan wildfire Part Three

Part Three of BC Today special programming with our reporters, callers and local officials updating as the emergency situation unfolds today in the Central Okanagan region. We hear from a doctor and expert on the health impacts of wildfire smoke. Hosted by CBC's Dan Burritt and Belle Puri.
53 minutes, 44 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Today Special Programming: BC Wildfires Part Three

We hear from officials and experts on the wildfires in British Columbia. In this hour we hear from UBC Sociologist Mary-Ann Murphy on the emotional and psychological toll of wildfire evacuation. We also heard from you, on the phones.
53 minutes, 11 seconds
Episode Artwork

Wildfire evacuation updates in BC and Northwest Territories; 2 year anniversary for Taliban takeover of Afghanistan

The change in weather today is expected to deepen wildfire challenges--the heat wave's drying conditions followed by a coming cold front's gusty winds and dry lightning. Our reporters Brady Strachan and Yvette Brend reported from the field, CBC meteorologist Darius Mahdavi forecasted what to expect, and guest Michael Mehta, Environmental Studies Professor, Thompson Rivers University discussed the challenges and limitations of B.C.'s emergency reporting. And guest Emma Roberts told us of her wildfire evacuee experience. Also, rallies took place around B.C. to mark the 2 year anniversary of the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan. Guest Lauryn Oates, Executive Director for Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan gave us an update on the situation.
50 minutes, 56 seconds
Episode Artwork

Special Emergency Programming: Central Okanagan wildfire evacuation Part Two

Part Two of BC Today special programming with our reporters, callers and local officials updating as the emergency situation unfolds today in the Central Okanagan region. Evacuations for West Kelowna, Westbank First Nation and parts of Kelowna, including the Okanagan campus of the University of British Columbia. Hosted by CBC's Lien Yeung.
53 minutes, 57 seconds
Episode Artwork

Special Emergency Programming: Central Okanagan wildfire evacuation Part One

Part One of BC Today special programming with our reporters, callers and local officials updating as the emergency situation unfolds today in the Central Okanagan region. Evacuations for West Kelowna, Westbank First Nation and parts of Kelowna, including the Okanagan campus of the University of British Columbia. Hosted by CBC's Lien Yeung and Chris Walker.
54 minutes, 47 seconds
Episode Artwork

Special Emergency Programming: Central Okanagan wildfire evacuation Part Three

Part Three of BC Today special programming with our reporters, callers and local officials updating as the emergency situation unfolds today in the Central Okanagan region. Evacuations for West Kelowna, Westbank First Nation and parts of Kelowna, including the Okanagan campus of the University of British Columbia. Hosted by CBC's Lien Yeung.
57 minutes, 29 seconds
Episode Artwork

Working in hot environments; and your thoughts on cashiers or self-checkouts

As our climate gets hotter, risks increase for working in hot environments. We take your questions and tips, and talk with experts Dr. Melanie Gorman Ng, Health and Exposure Scientist with the B-C Construction Safety Alliance and Suzana Prpic, WorkSafe BC's Senior Manager of Prevention Field Services. And in our second half, we explore the issue of cashiers vs. self check-out with David Ian Gray, founder of Dig360, a retail advisory headquartered in Vancouver.
50 minutes, 22 seconds
Episode Artwork

Understanding climate change anxiety; celebrating tomato season!

As heat alerts and wildfire evacuations become the norm, climate change anxiety is becoming recognized as a relatively new mental health challenge, we talk with Britt Wray, Director of Stanford Medicine’s Initiative on Climate Change and Mental Health; author of "Generation Dread" and take your calls. We switch gears for the second half to celebrate tomato season with Vish Mayekar, Head chef at Pepino’s Spaghetti House and Karen Barnaby, chef, cookbook author and product development at Goodly Foods.
50 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

Designing cooler homes; and teaching your kids about managing money.

Starting out this week with a chat about how to have cooler homes--what you can do now, and what designers are thinking about for the future with our guest Dr. Adam Rysanek, Assistant Professor with UBC's School of Architecture. And in our second segment, personal finance expert and CBC contributor Rubina Ahmed Haq joined us to talk about how to teach financial literacy to children.
50 minutes, 12 seconds
Episode Artwork

Advice for upcoming B.C. heatwave; and your questions answered on your feline friends

We hear from Upkar Singh-Tatlay, Executive Director, Engaged Communities Canada Society and Sarah B. Henderson, Scientific Director, Environmental Health Services, BC Centre for Disease Control on advice to deal with the upcoming heat wave. We also received great advice from callers. And in the second segment, we take your questions on cats with our guest Julie Posluns, Associate Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist, creator of Cat School.
48 minutes, 53 seconds
Episode Artwork

Devastating fire hits Maui; Commemorating Robbie Robertson

We'll hear from Travellers returning home to B.C. after a devastating wildfire tore through Maui, destroying most of the town of Lahaina. Next, we commemorate legendary musician Robbie Robertson of The Band.
51 minutes, 10 seconds
Episode Artwork

Reports of nasty raccoon attacks in Vancouver; Encouraging "brown" lawns; commemorating a fallen wildfire fighter

Some Vancouver residents have reported some pretty nasty raccoon encounters. We'll ask what we can do to prevent conflicts. Next, the rain may help our lawns, but for the most part, they have gone dry. How we can encourage alternatives to the manicured green lawns. Finally, we go live to the memorial procession in Penticton commemorating a fallen firefighter.
50 minutes, 19 seconds
Episode Artwork

Why is it so hard to find a wheelchair accessible taxi?; How to cut back your food waste

Coquitlam's mayor says one resident had to wait hours for a wheelchair accessible taxi. What's your experience? Next, food waste is a huge problem, what are your tips for using up your leftovers and food scraps?
49 minutes, 6 seconds
Episode Artwork

Long weekend camping tips and tricks; Brian Minter Friday

Amid news of B.C. Ferries travel issues and busy roads, many people are still on their way out camping this weekend. We're asking for your camping stories. Next, master gardener Brian Minter joins us to talk about how to get your garden prepared for winter.
52 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Taylor Swift is coming to Toronto...but not Vancouver; Why are food prices so high?

Taylor Swift is taking her Eras tour to Toronto...should she come to Vancouver too? Next, why are food prices still so high, and are they affecting you?
49 minutes, 49 seconds
Episode Artwork

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Sophie Gregoire separating; The great pickleball debate

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his wife, Sophie Gregoire have announced their separation.  So how much of a role does a politicians family plan in their popularity? Next, we talk about pickleball - are you a big fan or have you gone sour on the game?
50 minutes, 58 seconds
Episode Artwork

Meta ending news content for Canadian users; How to manage your debt

Meta has just announced it's blocking news content for Canadian users of Facebook and Instagram. Next, are you worried about your debt? How can you avoid and manage it? We'll talk about financial literacy.
49 minutes, 54 seconds
Episode Artwork

Urban fire danger; Dog behaviour expert takes your questions

Startling video from the North Vancouver fire department demonstrates how quickly a backyard fire can ignite from just one discarded cigarette butt. Next, our pets segment is back and we take your questions about puppy behaviour.
50 minutes, 8 seconds
Episode Artwork

Cabinet Shuffle: Canada Women's FIFA victory; Wedding etiquette

Some big names are out and some new ones are in after a major cabinet shuffle today in Ottawa Then over to the FIFA Women's World Cup where Canada showed its strength today, winning 2-1 over Ireland. Next, dip into wedding do's and don'ts.
50 minutes, 16 seconds
Episode Artwork

July set to become the hottest month on record; Adult children living at home

This July is on track to be the hottest month ever recorded. We're asking you, how has your life changed amid these increasingly hotter summers? Next, they're sometimes called "boomerang kids". We're talking all about adult kids moving back home.
50 minutes, 18 seconds
Episode Artwork

More travel chaos for B.C. Ferries; What's your favourite B.C. lake?

Waits on the Tsawwassen to Swartz Bay route stretched up to 12 hours this morning. It's just the latest turbulence this summer for BC Ferries. We're asking for your BC Ferry story. Next, it's lake season, and CBC is on the search for BC's Best Lake.
51 minutes, 53 seconds
Episode Artwork

What it's like working wildfire frontlines; Finances and feminism

Almost 500 wildfires are burning across the province, and they are taking a toll on B.C.'s firefighters. We're going to hear what it's like at the front lines. Next, finances and feminism, how can women save up and grow their wealth, amid rising costs and an unequal system?
48 minutes, 52 seconds
Episode Artwork

What's behind worsening wildfires in B.C?; What's on your summer bucket list?

This is the worse wildfire season on record in B.C. We know climate change has something to do with this...but what else is driving the growing fires? Next, what's on your summer bucket list? Is there an event or place that completes the season for you?
50 minutes, 21 seconds
Episode Artwork

Wildfire crews feeling toll of this season; Barbie Movie: and Minter Friday

In our first half hour we hear from BC Wildfire Service about how this season is impacting the mental health of crews on the front lines. And Barbie Movie is here, is she a feminist icon? Next, master gardener Brian Minter takes your questions.
50 minutes, 23 seconds
Episode Artwork

How is wildfire smoke affecting you?; what makes a superfan?

This wildfire season is now B.C.'s most destructive on record - and it's only the middle of July. We'll speak to an expert about about the health impacts of wildfire smoke. Next, are you a Swiftie? Did you ever have Beatlemania? We'll take a look at who is most likely to become a super fan - and whether some people take their obsession too far.
50 minutes, 28 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. decides on Surrey Police Service over RCMP; latest on the port strike

Solicitor General and Minister of Public Safety Mike Farnworth decides the Surrey Police Service is the way forward over the Surrey RCMP. We get reaction from CBC's Municipal Affairs Reporter Justin McElroy and Surrey City Councillor Linda Annis. Next, Federal Labour Minister Seamus O'Regan calls yesterday's strike action from port workers "illegal."
51 minutes, 13 seconds
Episode Artwork

How do find information in B.C. during wildfire season; How to save money travelling this summer

With wildfires burning across the province, and water restrictions in most areas - where do you find the latest emergency news? As the social media landscape changes, is it harder to find the most up to date - and correct - information? Next, travel can be an expensive endeavor. Is there a way to safe money when planning your big trip?
50 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

Impact of Hollywood actors' strike in B.C.; tips on horse behaviour

The film industry in B.C. is bracing as a strike by actors in the U.S. begins today. Couple that with the months-long writers' strike, and the slowdown has been ongoing for months. We hear how that is impacting local actors. And in the second half of our Friday show, our pets column is back and this time, we'll talk about horses. An equestrian takes listeners' questions on training, behaviour, and care.
50 minutes, 18 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. Port Strike Is Over and Heat Pumps

We have the latest update on the 13-day B.C. Port Strike ending this morning with a tentative agreement between the International Longshore and Warehouse Workers Union and the B.C. Maritime Employers Association. Our guest was Bridgitte Anderson, President and CEO of the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade. Then we switch to discussing heat pumps with our guest Joe Cheriex, owner of Controlled Air Heating and Cooling.
25 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

How will automation change jobs?; Canada interest rate jumps again

We begin with the latest developments on the strike at western ports. One of the key concerns from unions is the impact of automation, so we find out how it's set to impact industries across the country. Later, we bring you the latest on the wildfires, with concerns growing in the North and the Cariboo. Also today, as the Bank of Canada increases its key interest rate once again, we answer listeners' questions on what the decision means for mortgage-holders. BC Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
49 minutes, 5 seconds
Episode Artwork

Bracing for further water restrictions as drought worsens; Your favourite summer reads

Drought is worsening across B.C. It's much earlier, and more widespread, than in previous years. It means the province is expected to bring in further water restrictions later this week. We discuss what needs to happen in the short- and long-term, and ask listeners how it's impacting them. And in the second half of our Tuesday show, we discuss summer reads, and the books that are keeping you entertained and inspired. BC Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
49 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

The middle-income earners struggling with rental costs; Tips for bird-watching this summer

We begin with the story of a single dad making $75,000 a year, who can't find an affordable place to rent. Karl Eaton makes too much to qualify for B.C. housing, but can't afford the market. We're asking, how do you feel about the state of rental housing in our province? We also get an update from the province, on the breaking news this lunchtime that a state of emergency is declared for Stikine region. And to close our Monday show, we get tips and advice for the summer bird-watching season.
50 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

How hard is it to get a building permit where you live?; the rise of non-alcoholic drinks

A Vancouver homebuilder is fed up with all the extensive steps needed to do any permitted work. And his recent social media rant sparked a lot of discussion. Next, there's been a huge increase in the demand for non alcoholic cocktails. Has your relationship to alcohol changed?
50 minutes, 59 seconds
Episode Artwork

Unemployment rate goes up in Canada plus being bear aware in B.C.; Brian Minter Friday

In our first half, the unemployment rate in Canada has gone up to 5.4 per cent - the highest it's been in over a year. And, a tree-planter has been air-lifted to hospital in northeastern B.C. after a bear attack. We take your calls on how to be bear-aware. Next, Brian Minter is here to take your gardening questions.
50 minutes, 51 seconds
Episode Artwork

Global temperatures hottest on record ever; what's the best summer job you ever had?

This week saw the hottest global average air temperatures ever recorded. B.C. is also in for another week of heat. Next, Summer jobs can be a right of passage for many teens, but where can they find a good gig? And is it all about the money, or can they learn something more valuable?
50 minutes, 35 seconds
Episode Artwork

Changing face of social media; What happens when you get lost in the woods

Social media giant Meta is rolling out a new alternative to Twitter - but is the battle for users driving more people off line? Could this be the end of social media as we know it? Next, following the extraordinary story of one teen's survival being lost in the wilderness, we talk to an expert on how you can stay safe outdoors.
50 minutes, 50 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. port workers strike; controversial dog park by-law in Saanich

More than seven thousand port workers are striking as the union continues negotiations. What impact will this have on shipping and the Canadian economy? Next, Despite a lot of opposition, the district of Saanich will soon crack down on dogs who are off leash in some parks.
49 minutes, 25 seconds
Episode Artwork

Disappointment over bail reform delay; What's needed to address abuse in sport

Western premiers met this week, including David Eby, and said the federal government is lagging on bail reform. We hear ways to address the issue of repeat offences. And in the second half of our program, we hear what's needed to ensure safety from abuse in sport. We speak with former soccer international Ciara McCormack, and ask you how sports should address abuse, and protect athletes.
50 minutes, 4 seconds
Episode Artwork

More ferry cancellations this long weekend; Your pet care questions answered

On this busy holiday travel weekend, B.C. Ferries says it's cancelling sailings and reassigning more than 6,600 bookings from one of its largest ships because of unplanned maintenance. Travellers heading between Tsawwassen and Swartz Bay are being told to expect sailing waits. We discuss what's needed to address the disruption with MLA Adam Olsen, and take listeners' calls. Later in the show we get an update from Cranbrook, where a new ban on encampments has been introduced. And we end with our pet segment, where Dr. Lauren Adelman takes your questions on pet care. BC Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
49 minutes, 43 seconds
Episode Artwork

How to prepare for the next heat emergency; Keeping kids entertained during the summer

Dan Burritt is our host today. It's been almost two years since BC was enveloped by a deadly heat dome which killed more than 600 people in our province, many of them vulnerable. It also spurred calls to make sure people have access to cool spaces. We speak to advocates for those most at risk, and ask listeners for their experiences of the event. And in our second half, we get advice for parents and guardians as the summer break gets underway for kids across B.C.
50 minutes, 4 seconds
Episode Artwork

Ottawa presents national climate adaptation strategy; Elite athletes demand public inquiry into abuse in sports

The Canadian government released its national climate adaptation strategy at a press conference in Vancouver on Tuesday. We discuss the plan with Federal Environment Minister, Steven Guilbeault, and hear from listeners on the supports they want to cope with climate change impacts. And in the second half of our show, we discuss the abuse faced by women in sport, and ask what must be done to rid sports of discrimination and abuse against women? BC Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
50 minutes, 20 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Hydro knew of safety risks years before Vancouver explosion; Your gardening questions answered

We begin with a stunning admission from BC Hydro that it knew for years of the risk of an underground explosion that happened this past February in downtown Vancouver, which injured two bystanders and damaged businesses close by. We speak to one of the business owners impacted, and get reaction from BC United's Peter Milobar. And in the second half of our Friday show, it's our bi-weekly visit with gardening expert Brian Minter. BC Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
49 minutes, 7 seconds
Episode Artwork

Debris found in search for missing submersible; How to address the challenge of bike theft in B.C.

Dan Burritt is our host today. We begin with developing news on the desperate search for a submersible lost while trying to explore the wreck of the Titanic. The U.S. Coast Guard says a debris field has now been found. And in our second half, we look at bike theft. We discuss how the public can prevent it, and the steps police and cities should take. BC Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
50 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

Surrey's policing dilemma; calls for gig workers to get better protections.

Our Tuesday show begins with the latest on the political battle brewing over the Surrey police transition. We're joined by CBC Municipal Affairs Reporter Justin McElroy and Wade Deisman, Director of Academic Programs and Public Safety Branch, Justice Institute of BC and Kwantlen University criminology professor. In our second half, we discuss workers' rights for gig workers. Our guests were Jim Stanford Economist and Director for the Centre for Future Work; and is Iglika Ivanova Senior Economist and Public Interest Researcher at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives in BC. And, as always, your calls. BC Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
50 minutes, 55 seconds
Episode Artwork

How Indigenous knowledge helps communities facing wildfires; Celebrating National Indigenous Peoples Day

Up first, the role of Indigenous knowledge in managing forests and wildfires in what's already one of the worst wildfire seasons on record. We also celebrate National Indigenous Peoples Day with our guests, and ask listeners how they are marking the occasion. BC Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
50 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

How to balance density with preserving neighbourhoods; Your electric vehicles questions answered

Our Monday show begins with the latest on the fatal shooting outside a Sikh temple in Surrey. We also discuss a housing proposal in Vancouver that would double the population of the West Point Grey neighbourhood as it goes to public consultation. And we end the show with a discussion on electric vehicles, and get answers to listeners' questions. BC Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
49 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

Canada's estimated population hits 40 million people; The personal benefits of fishing

As we go to air, Canada's population just surpassed 40 million people, according to a Statistics Canada estimate. We discuss the milestone, and ask what are the opportunities, and what are the challenges of that surge in population growth? And in the second half of our Friday show: we ask for your favourite fishing spots in B.C., and what are the benefits of fishing for you? B.C. Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
48 minutes, 59 seconds
Episode Artwork

The future of media in B.C.; The appeal of gardening, even in small spaces

News media is ever changing. As mass layoffs are announced by Bell Media, shuttering two of its Vancouver radio stations and laying off staff at its TV outlets in B.C., we're asking for your thoughts on news consumption and how your own daily habits changed. And in the second half of our Thursday show: we get advice for gardening in apartments and other small spaces. B.C. Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
49 minutes, 51 seconds
Episode Artwork

Provincial wildfire update; addressing anti-trans rhetoric

We're live in Vancouver where the province is giving an update on the wildfire situation, and get additional details from our legislative reporter, Meera Bains. And in the second half of our Wednesday show, we discuss the fallout of an incident in Kelowna, where a man questioned a 9-year-old's gender in what her family is describing as a 'gobsmacking' track-and-field incident. Also today: it is graduation season and the parties are under way, so we get advice for the graduates in your life. B.C. Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
48 minutes, 53 seconds
Episode Artwork

How wildfires hurt the tourism industry in B.C.; Your dog behaviour questions answered

Tourism businesses are among the many being negatively impacted by the disruption caused by wildfires. We hear directly from the Wickaninnish Inn about how the closure of Highway 4 on Vancouver Island is hurting bookings, and we speak to Tourism Revelstoke about the impact on their location as 'brand B.C.' gets tarnished by another year of problems. And in the second half of our Monday show, we are introducing a new regular pet segment on the show! We're joined by a dog trainer today, taking your calls on your puppy problems and your dog dilemmas. B.C. Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver Youtube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
49 minutes, 10 seconds
Episode Artwork

How climate disasters are impacting our province's roads; Planning the perfect picnic

We hear live from the province's transport minister as a tentative timeline for the reopening of Highway 4 is announced. Listeners share their thoughts on the gaps in our province's transportation network, and whether their communities need additional routes. And in the second half of our Tuesday show: we get advice on the ideal picnic! Listeners share their views on the perfect picnic bits and bites. B.C. Today is now available as a live video stream, and you can watch us online at cbc.ca/bc, on the CBC Gem app, and on the CBC Vancouver YouTube page, as well as on CBC Listen and on your radio.
49 minutes, 30 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. implements campfire ban; Celebrating Pride Month

As wildfire season gets under way, a campfire ban takes effect across the province. As you head to the outdoors this season, what are your tips for enjoying the experience without a campfire? Next, it's Pride Month. We'll be joined by two artists sharing their pride.
51 minutes, 20 seconds
Episode Artwork

Noon update on the Tumbler Ridge evacuation; Brian Minter answers your gardening questions

We begin with the latest (at noon PDT, 1pm MDT) on the evacuation of more than 2,400 people from the Tumbler Ridge area, due to an aggressive wildfire that started just days ago. We have a reporter in Chetwynd where some of those displaced have gone. And as the country faces its worst wildfire season yet, we discuss evacuation procedures and advice with the CBC's Johanna Wagstaffe. And in the second half of our Friday program, it's our regular segment with gardener Brian Minter, where listeners questions are answered. A quick note that from Monday, in addition to listening to BC Today, you'll also be able to watch the program live as a TV show. We'll be streaming live on CBC Gem, cbc.ca/bc, and on our CBC Vancouver YouTube channel. We're excited to share our new video simulcast with you!
50 minutes, 31 seconds
Episode Artwork

Bank of Canada raises interest rates again; Migraine awareness month

Interest rates are up again. It comes after a pause in hikes by the Bank of Canada since the beginning of the year. We're talking about what this means for mortgages and talking to people looking to buy their first home. Next, June is Migraine Awareness Month and one in four households in Canada has a person living with migraines. We hear your stories.
51 minutes, 10 seconds
Episode Artwork

Do you agree with municipal drinking in parks programs?; Advocates press for action on Canada Disability Benefit bill

The city of Burnaby passed a pilot program for consumption of alcohol in parks. It joins a number of cities with similar programs. Next, disability advocates are pressing the government to urgently pass the Canada Disability benefit bill before this session ends. What would that mean for you? Is it enough?
51 minutes, 23 seconds
Episode Artwork

Drowning in North Vancouver prompts calls for water safety awareness; How to plan for retirement

This weekend a man in his 20's drowned in Rice Lake. And that's raising warnings about water safety. Next, we're talking how to prepare for retirement. Are you looking at the next stage?
52 minutes, 18 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. offering a rebate on E-bikes; All about BBQ

The BC government is offering rebates on electric bikes, as a way to get more people out of vehicles. What's your experience with e-bikes? Next, we're joined by two barbecue chefs to take your questions and recipes.
51 minutes, 54 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C puts 10 cities on a list to meet housing targets; Are we loving the outdoors to death?

Ten municipalities in B.C. have been pegged to push harder on meeting higher housing targets. If you live in one of these places, do you agree there needs to be more housing built where you live, more quickly? Next, the weather is warmer and we are heading outdoors. But are we loving the nature to death? How can we enjoy nature without disrespecting it.
51 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

Minimum wage is going up; Motorcycle safety this summer

B.C.'s minimum wage is about to go up to $16.75 per hour, is that enough to meet the cost of living? Next, after a string of motorcycle accidents some are calling for more awareness and improved road conditions.
51 minutes, 58 seconds
Episode Artwork

Public safety concerns rise again after possible gang-related violence; and Michael J. Fox's story inspires hope in people diagnosed with Parkinson's

A series of murders in Vancouver this weekend sparked fears of public safety, we were joined by Wade Deisman, Director of Academic Programs, Public Safety Branch of the Justice Institute of BC and former Hells' Angel, now professional speaker Joe Calendino to discuss; Michael J. Fox's new documentary "Still" chronicles his eventual acceptance of Parkinson's disease and becoming a force for change in the disease's research. BC Entertainment Hall of Fame President Bill Allard and Parkinson's Society of BC CEO Jean Blake joined us to share how Micheal J. Fox has impacted the search for a cure.
51 minutes, 2 seconds
Episode Artwork

Some B.C. doctors raising the alarm about our healthcare system; How to prepare for wildfire season

More doctors have written an open letter about the state of healthcare in their unit. This time, OBGYN physicians at Surrey Memorial. Next, B.C. is preparing for wildfire season, what can you do to protect your home?
51 minutes, 35 seconds
Episode Artwork

A new report says a healthy diet is out of reach for low-income people in B.C.; Brian Minter Friday

Food prices have soared over the last year and now the BC Centre for Disease control is weighing in, warning a nutritious diet is out of reach for low-income British Columbians. Next, Brian Minter answers your gardening questions.
50 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

The wide impact of concussions

When you think of concussions, sports injuries come to mind. And Vancouver Whitecaps player Ali Ahmed is just the latest athlete to suffer one during play. We'll hear more about that, and from athletes like Olympic gold medalist Katie Weatherston, who now work to raise awareness. But these injuries happen elsewhere. Including cases of domestic violence. Today, a full hour on these traumatic brain injuries.
50 minutes, 53 seconds
Episode Artwork

Almost 10 percent of homes in B.C. owned by investor-occupants; UBC's oldest graduate on going back to school

A new report from Statistics Canada says that Investor occupants - those who own a single property with multiple units, including their own residence - made up almost 10 percent of BC homeowners in 2020. But what does this mean for rental market? Next, it's never too late to learn. We'll speak with UBC's oldest graduate and find out why there doesn't have to be an end to your education.
52 minutes, 14 seconds
Episode Artwork

New guidelines on how to protect yourself from extreme heat; How to deal with allergies in infants

As we continue to see extreme weather events and rising temperatures, new guidelines detail how to protect yourself and loved ones from the heat. Next, food allergies can be a major source of stress for new parents. When is the best time to introduce your infant to allergenic foods?
52 minutes, 30 seconds
Episode Artwork

WestJet and it's pilots reach a tentative deal; Should schools ban cellphones?

It was down to the wire, but West Jet and it's pilots reached a a tentative deal to avoid a strike. We want to know how your travel habits have adapted to airline disruptions. Next, cellphone use in schools can be a battle between teachers and teens. How should parents and schools adapt to technology use by students?
52 minutes, 12 seconds
Episode Artwork

Restaurants struggling in B.C.; addressing the taboo

The restaurant industry is still struggling to recover from the impacts of COVID-19, inflation, and labour shortages. Now, the sector is pleading for relief. Next, death is an inevitable part of life. So why are we still so uncomfortable talking about the end of life?
52 minutes, 42 seconds
Episode Artwork

Federal government tables bail reform bill; B.C. Museum Week

The BC government is applauding Ottawa on its plan to reform our bail system. The changes would make it harder for people deemed repeat violent offenders to get released - but will the changes work? Next, it's B.C. Museum Week, do you have a favourite place to visit?
52 minutes, 35 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. renters face Canada's highest eviction rates; Avoiding camping mistakes this summer

Dan Burritt is our host today. Renters in British Columbia face the highest eviction rates in Canada, but it's through no fault of their own, according to a new report from researchers at the University of British Columbia. The report comes on top of new Rentals.ca figures suggesting that rental costs nationally have increased by 20% in the past two years. We discuss the state of the province's rental market, and take your calls. And in the second half of our Monday program: camping is a B.C. tradition, but have things ever gone a bit dodgy for you in the woods? We hear tales of camping failures, and the lessons learned, to prepare you for the summer ahead.
50 minutes, 27 seconds
Episode Artwork

Midday update on the Fort St John evacuation alert; Making the kitchen more accessible

Dan Burritt is our host today. Our CBC News teams are on the ground in Fort St John, bringing the latest news and information to residents as the city remains under evacuation alert as we go to air. We get the latest, speak to residents, and find out what's to come in the forecast - with province-wide implications. And in the second half of our Tuesday show: for people with physical disabilities or those who are neuro-divergent, the kitchen can be a daunting place. But with the right tools and shared knowledge, it doesn't have to be. We speak to Jules Sherred, a food photographer, and author of "Crip Up the Kitchen: Tools, Tips, and Recipes for the Disabled Cook".
50 minutes, 36 seconds
Episode Artwork

Assessing B.C.'s Heat Alert Response System; Brian Minter answers your gardening questions

Dan Burritt is our host today. The B.C. Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) said the province is in a better place to deal with extreme heat compared to the summer of 2021 when hundreds of people died in the heat dome weather event. We hear an assessment of the province's response, as British Columbians prepare for the first significant heat of the summer. And in our second half, with the weekend heat on the minds of many gardeners, expert Brian Minter answers our listeners' questions.
50 minutes, 33 seconds
Episode Artwork

Doctors of B.C. says ERs across province 'overrun'; How to support mothers

Dan Burritt is hosting today. Doctors of B.C. is warning that emergency departments across our province are "overrun", and need urgent help. The call comes after a doctor asked colleagues to direct patients away from Langley Memorial Hospital. We discuss with healthcare workers, and listeners share their experiences. And in the second half of our Thursday program: as we approach Mother's Day, we're talking about Super Moms! The ones who do, or have to do, everything. We find out how they can be better-supported in B.C.
50 minutes, 20 seconds
Episode Artwork

What the B.C. Housing forensic audit found out; Protecting the bees of B.C. as warmer weather arrives

Dan Burritt is our host today. A long-awaited investigation into B.C. Housing has found mismanagement linked to a conflict of interest between its former CEO and his spouse, who runs the largest housing operator in the province. We discuss the story and get more details. And in the second half of our Tuesday program: spring has sprung, pollen is in the air, and the outdoors is buzzing with activity. And that means bees are coming out in full force. But some beekeepers are concerned about bee health this season after disease and weather wiped out huge numbers of them last year. We find out more, and answer your bee-related questions.
48 minutes, 52 seconds
Episode Artwork

Assessing this summer's wildfire and weather risks; B.C. initiative to raise mental health awareness for young sports stars

Dan Burritt is our host today. We are bracing for summer temperatures across B.C. this week, raising concerns for more flooding and fires. We look ahead to the coming months and listeners share how they're preparing for extreme events. And in the second half of our Wednesday program: high school basketball players will gather in Langley for an event called Bigger than Basketball. It's an initiative to raise awareness aboout mental health in sports and support the Canadian Mental Health Association. We hear from an organizer and discuss how athletes can prepare themselves with Dr. Saul Miller, a sports psychologist and author of the newly released book, Winning Golf: The Mental Game.
50 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

The state of labour relations in B.C.; One in six Canadians experiences infertility

Dan Burritt is our host today. Amid inflation and the rising cost of living, lots of Canadian workers in the public and private sector want a closer look at what they're being paid. We discuss the state of labour relations in B.C. with our guests, and hear from listeners. And in the second half of our Monday program, while Mother's Day is a celebratory event for many, the Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society says on average, one in six Canadians experiences infertility. This means that events like Mother's Day can be a painful reminder for prospective parents and guardians. We discuss that topic.
47 minutes, 52 seconds
Episode Artwork

WHO downgrades COVID-19; Will you be watching the Royal Coronation?

The World Health Organization has officially declared COVID-19 is no longer a public health emergency, but says it is still a global threat. What does this mean for B.C.? And will you be watching the coronation of King Charles tomorrow?
50 minutes, 57 seconds
Episode Artwork

Flooding in B.C.; How to use your tax return wisely

Flooding is causing highway closures and evacuation orders in communities throughout the interior. Are you worried about high waters where you live? How do you prepare? And what should B.C.’s flood strategy be in 2023? Next, the tax deadline has passed. Are you looking at a refund coming your way? We'll have personal finance journalist Rubina Ahmed Haq taking your calls and questions.
52 minutes, 34 seconds
Episode Artwork

Do we need more short term rental regulation?; Privacy and security when it comes to security cameras

The BC Green Party says short term rentals are contributing to the housing crisis and it wants provincial regulation. Next, a shocking story that happened at an Airbnb. Guests finding hidden cameras aimed at showers. What are your concerns about privacy, and how technology may be used to violate it?
52 minutes, 27 seconds
Episode Artwork

Hollywood writers go on strike; what are the hidden food gems in your city?

A Hollywood writers strike could affect BC's film industry, and the shows you watch. Next, Surrey has been named one of the world's best emerging food cities, by Food and Wine magazine. We take a trip there and we're asking you - what are the hidden foodie gems in your city?
50 minutes, 39 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC prepares for wildfire season; What are your bowling memories?

It's the start of May and B.C. already has two evacuation alerts for wildfires. How are environmental risks changing how you prepare for summer? Next, another local bowling lane is closing, this time in Burnaby. What bowling memories do you have? Does your community still have a bowling centre?
50 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Surrey Mayor hits back at Province recommendation to continue police transition; Your gardening questions answered by Brian Minter

The Province is recommending that the City of Surrey continues with its transition to a municipal police force. But it's not a binding decision. And the city's Mayor, Brenda Locke, tells BC Today that her plans to retain the Surrey RCMP will continue. We get the latest and hear from listeners. And in the second half of Friday's program, we get your gardening questions answered by Brian Minter.
50 minutes, 26 seconds
Episode Artwork

Public safety rallies in cities across the province; The role of artificial intelligence in education

Amy Bell is our host today. Rallies are taking place this afternoon in cities across British Columbia, calling for more action to be taken to protect public safety. We discuss the events, and listeners offer their thoughts. And in the second half of our Thursday program, we discuss what role artificial intelligence should play in education. We speak to Sarah Elaine Eaton, Associate Professor of Education at the University of Calgary.
50 minutes, 53 seconds
Episode Artwork

Attack on Uber driver triggers calls for better gig worker protections; Summit to address women's heart health

An Uber driver in Abbotsford is recovering from a brutal attack by a passenger last Tuesday. It's prompting calls from labour leaders for ride-hailing companies to better protect their drivers. We hear from listeners and speak to the president of the B.C. Federation of Labour, Sussanne Skidmore. And in the second half of our Tuesday program, experts, health professionals and women living with heart disease are gathering in Vancouver this week for a summit to address women's heart health.
50 minutes, 17 seconds
Episode Artwork

Telus Health agrees to change subscription-based health service; Your guide to hiking as the weather heats up

Amy Bell is our host today. The commission that manages British Columbia's $2.5-billion health-care system is no longer seeking a court injunction against a program operated by Telus that charged thousands of dollars a year for access to care, the province's health minister says. We find out the details. And in the second half of our Wednesday program: temperatures on the South Coast will reach the high 20s this weekend. As hikers prepare for the warm weather, we hear from an expert what outdoor enthusiasts should keep in mind.
50 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

Poll suggests most Canadians don't want Charles as King; Why public workers are looking for remote work options

When Queen Elizabeth II died, there was an outpouring of support and affection. But those feelings don't seem to be continuing for King Charles III, according to a new survey from the Angus Reid Institute. We discuss what future the monarchy might play in Canada, and ask listeners for their views. Plus, the federal civil workers strike continues and the issue of remote work is on the table. We discuss the future of that working model in the second half of our Monday program.
49 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Mixed reaction to expansion of shipping port in Delta; Making the most of another wet weekend

B.C. will be able to handle millions of extra shipping containers each year when a port near the Tsawwassen ferry terminal is expanded. Some are welcoming the economic benefits.But others are questioning the impact on the environment, and on workers. We hear both sides,and take your calls. And in the second half of our Friday program: the wet spring weather continues, but so do events across the province. Listeners share their advice for making the most of the rainy spring.
49 minutes, 39 seconds
Episode Artwork

One of Canada's largest federal strikes starts today; and we talk about potential solutions for chronic pain.

Picket lines were up on the first day of one of Canada's largest strikes in recent history. We're joined by UBC's Sauder School of Business Professor Emeritus Mark Thompson to talk about the impacts and context of the strike. In our second half, chronic pain expert Dr. Andrea Furlan takes us through her new book "8 Steps to Conquer Chronic Pain". Dr. Furlan is an Dr. Andrea Furlan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Toronto and a Staff Physician and Senior Scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute.
49 minutes, 16 seconds
Episode Artwork

What kind of swimwear should be allowed at public pools?; The campaign to help men eat more healthily

Vancouver Park Board staff are proposing new rules on what would be considered appropriate swimwear. It would deem unacceptable "items designed for sexual/intimate purposes, or attire with long, flowy fabric that may limit movement". We discuss with our guests, and take calls from listeners. And in the second half of our show, well-known chef Ned Bell is part of a campaign to encourage men to eat more healthily, as stats show they're falling behind on adding fruits and vegetables.
49 minutes, 29 seconds
Episode Artwork

Federal public servants to strike Wednesday if no deal reached; Protecting teens on public transit

We speak to the union representing federal public servants, and hear how business owners would be impacted by strike action. And in the second half of our program: there were more attacks on transit in Metro Vancouver over the weekend. As the community mourns last week's fatal stabbing of a 17-year-old in Surrey, we discuss how the recent incidents are prompting conversations between parents and teenagers about safety on transit.
47 minutes, 37 seconds
Episode Artwork

BC Coroner releases grim poisoned drug death statistics for 2023; Is living with roommates a good solution for the housing crisis?

We speak with BC's Chief Coroner Lisa Lapointe about the latest statistics for the first three months of 2023 in poisoned drug deaths in our province--on pace to be the second highest since the start of the public health emergency started in 2016. In our second half, we speak with Tenant Rights Action Committee lawyer Robert Patterson to learn about the rights and loopholes for roommates.
49 minutes, 30 seconds
Episode Artwork

Marking seven years of the overdose emergency in B.C.; Brian Minter answers your gardening questions

B.C. is marking a grim anniversary on Friday. Seven years ago, the province declared the toxic drug crisis a public health emergency. The situation is only getting worse, with March setting some new overdose records in our province. We'll hear from an advocate in the Kootenays, and from the province's Minister of Mental Health and Addictions. And in the second half of Friday's program, Earth Day is approaching, and Brian Minter will talk about what role gardeners can play in protecting our environment.
49 minutes, 21 seconds
Episode Artwork

Stabbing of teen in Surrey prompts community safety concerns; the impact of the rising cost of pet care

Reaction is continuing to the fatal stabbing of a 17-year old on a bus in Surrey this week. We find out what the crime data says about safety on transit in the region, and ask listeners for their experiences. And in the second half of Thursday's show, our conversation of the cost of living continues with a focus on pet care. We discuss how we can ensure how animals can continue to be cared for as the pressure on families increases.
49 minutes, 10 seconds
Episode Artwork

Vancouver Mayor Ken Sim on the Downtown Eastside decampment; BBC reality show highlights the gaps in public transport in B.C.

Up first, one week since the removal of tents and structures along East Hastings street in Vancouver, the city's Mayor, Ken Sim, joins us on the decampment process and what's next. And in the second half of our Tuesday program, a BBC reality show is highlighting the lack of public transportation across regions in B.C. We discuss that and ask listeners for their experiences trying to get around the province.
49 minutes, 42 seconds
Episode Artwork

The state of public transit in B.C; Parents are struggling to find swimming classes for their kids

We had a huge reaction to Tuesday's discussion about a BBC reality show which demonstrated to lack of public transit options across swathes of our province. We hear more listener stories, and speak to the Chair of the Fraser Valley Regional District. In the second half of our program, we discuss the struggle many parents are facing trying to find swimming lessons for their kids. To get in touch, you can email us any time at [email protected].
43 minutes, 50 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. Budget Special 2023

Katrine Conroy presents B.C.'s budget for 2023, and Meera Bains, Bill Tieleman, Allie Blades, Adam Olsen, Bryan Yu, Meena Brisard, Jonny Morris, Thom Armstrong, Alex Hemingway, Torrance Coste, Khelsilem and Fiona Famulak discuss it.
1 hour, 30 minutes, 6 seconds
Episode Artwork

New funding to tackle air passenger complaints backlog; supporting parents through spring break

Dan Burritt is in the host’s chair today. Passenger complaints continue to pile up as the airline industry builds back from the pandemic. As new federal funding is announced to cope with the backlog, we speak to Anthony Perl, Professor in Urban Studies at Simon Fraser University. And in the second half of our show, we get advice for parents whose children are looking for things to do as spring break continues.
43 minutes, 58 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. introduces new sextortion legislation; New Westminster City Council ties fines to income levels.

We begin Monday's program with lawyer and Chair of the Uniform Law Conference of Canada's Advisory Committee Peter Lown, as BC introduces new Intimate Images Protection legislation today to protect people from sextortion. Then we head over to New Westminster to speak with Mayor Patrick Johnstone about the council's decision to tie fines to income.
50 minutes, 22 seconds
Episode Artwork

more aerial objects downed in North American skies; How can you get the most out of loyalty programs?

A lot of eyes have been on the skies this weekend after more mysterious flying objects were shot down. This time involving Canadian airspace. Plus, inflation eats into Starbucks rewards cards. How can you get the most out of loyalty programs?
50 minutes, 57 seconds
Episode Artwork

We need to talk: Inflation rates have dropped, but grocery prices are still high. And a BC parent files a potential game changer of a lawsuit against the maker of Fortnite.

Kelleen Wiseman, UBC Faculty of Food and Land systems and Viveca Ellis, Single Mothers' Alliance, join us to talk about the impact on rising food prices. Independent technology analyst Carmi Levy and MediaSmarts Director of Education Matthew Johnson talk about the proposed class action lawsuit filed last Friday against Epic Games, maker of massively popular video game Fortnite.
50 minutes, 56 seconds
Episode Artwork

Should Canada hold a public inquiry on election interference; Tips for healthy aging

In our first half we'll hear from our reporter Corey Bullock who has the latest on the avalanche that led to three fatalities and several injuries. And we go to Ottawa, where hearings took place into allegations of interference in Canadian elections. Next, we ask you what you do to maintain health and well-being as you get older?
50 minutes, 36 seconds
Episode Artwork

Latest on the Downtown Eastside decampment in Vancouver; Supreme Court of Canada dismisses appeal over right to access private care

CBC News reporter Joel Ballard joins us with the latest from the Downtown Eastside. Later in the program, we discuss the end of a 14-year legal battle to allow more access to private health care. We'll get reaction to the Supreme Court of Canada's decision, and ask listeners for their perspective.
33 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

B.C. Budget Day; Good habits for a better sleep

It's Budget Day in B.C. Ahead of its delivery this afternoon we're asking what you think the priorities should be. Next, a new sleep study finds five good sleep habits that can benefit your health.
50 minutes, 43 seconds
Episode Artwork

Ottawa withdraws amendments to firearms law; Brian Minter Friday

Ottawa is withdrawing amendments to its pending firearms law. Critics have called the amendments unfair to hunters and farmers. Next, Brian Minter is back for his regular gardening segment.
50 minutes, 18 seconds
Episode Artwork

Toxic drugs and overdose deaths in the South Asian community; Lunar New Year traditions and music

5X Press editor-in-chief Jeevan Sangha and Khalsa Aid Canada Metro Vancouver team coordinator Baljit Lally discuss toxic drugs and overdose deaths in the South Asian community and among international students. Pianist Karen Lee-Morlang and drag performer Van Dang discuss music and traditions associated with Lunar New Year, as well as some of the events they'll be hosting in celebration this year.
50 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Do disposable cup fees work?; We take your questions on electric vehicles

Vancouver City Council is debating whether to scrap the 25 cent disposable coffee cup fee introduced last year. We're asking you if extra fees for single use items make you change your behaviour. Next, we're bringing back electric vehicle expert Ken Bokor to take your questions.
51 minutes, 1 second
Episode Artwork

US President Joe Biden makes his first official visit to Canada

University of the Fraser Valley Political Science Professor Hamish Telford joins Michelle to discuss the significance of U.S. President Joe Biden's visit to Canada today.
13 minutes, 23 seconds
Episode Artwork

What more should we do about toxic-drug deaths? How can we separate fact from fiction in women's health?

Garth Mullins is a member of the Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users, a drug-user activist, and host of the Crackdown podcast. Dr. Jen Gunter is an ob-gyn and the best-selling author of The Vagina Bible and The Menopause Manifesto.
50 minutes, 35 seconds
Episode Artwork

New Child Poverty Report Card for B.C.; It's Valentine's Day, and we're talking all about rom coms

Child poverty dropped during the early days of the pandemic. That's largely thanks to government support and subsidies. But have those positive impacts lasted? Next, it's Valentine's Day and we're taking calls on your favourite romantic comedies.
50 minutes, 30 seconds
Episode Artwork

Canada added 150,000 jobs last month; Your favourite books about Black Canadian experiences

Michelle Eliot is back in the host's seat today. We start with more on the aftermath of the earthquake disasters in Turkey and Syria, and the moment a miraculous rescue from the rubble was caught on camera. Also on the show: for the second month in a row, the Canadian economy added jobs at a rate that blew past expectations. The news comes as the province's Labour Market Outlook predicts one million new jobs in B.C. over the next decade. But behind it all, there are challenges. Labour shortages are making it difficult for many businesses to grow. And the national economy is expected to lose steam in the short-term. We discuss what it means for workers, and for the economy, and take your calls. And in the second half of Friday's program: listeners tell us about their favourite books about Black Canadian experiences. Michelle speaks to Ryan B. Patrick of CBC Books about the Black Canadian writers who are making their mark. To share your thoughts on today's program, you can email the team at [email protected].
49 minutes, 43 seconds
Episode Artwork

Residents of Hastings St. speak out against tent removals; MLA Melanie Mark resigns

Residents and advocates are speaking out against tent removal on on Hastings St. in Vancouver. We're asking what governments and municipalities should do to make sure people are housed. Next, NDP MLA Melanie Mark announced she will be resigning, calling legislature a "torture chamber." We're talking about how to achieve equal representation in politics.
50 minutes, 8 seconds
Episode Artwork

Vancouver police begin removing East Hastings Street encampment; Why is there demand for Ozempic as a weight loss drug?

We're live in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside, as police move in as part of a City of Vancouver plan to remove a street encampment from the neighbourhood. And in the second half of our show today, we look at the growing interest in the drug Ozempic for weight loss, and what it says about today's diet culture.
49 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

The UN says we need to act now to combat climate change, the latest on the Fraser Valley transit strike and the shortage of workers in the trades.

Tom Green, David Suzuki Foundation'sS enior Climate Advisor, joins us to talk about the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)'s summary report on climate change; CBC Reporter Michelle Ghoussoub gives us an update on the Fraser Valley transit strike; and Mike Bocsik, Camosun College automotive instructor and Nancy Darling, Okanagan College's program administrator for trade and appreticeship talk about the need for more people to work in the skilled trades.
50 minutes, 26 seconds
Episode Artwork

Understanding the challenges of homeless encampments in BC and finding ways to coexist with coyotes.

Katt Cadieux founder and Executive Director of UNDO: Uniting Northern Drug Users and Marie-Josée Houle, Federal Housing Advocate, Canadian Human Rights Commission join us to talk about the challenges of homeless encampments. And, Animal Rights Lawyer Victoria Schoff and Lesley Fox from the animal advocacy group the Fur Bearers take us through some strategies to co-exist peacefully with coyotes in our urban environments.
51 minutes, 22 seconds
Episode Artwork

The future of B.C.'s forestry industry; teens and social media

Amid mill closures and government funding announcements, John Brink of Brink Forest Products discusses the future of B.C.'s forestry industry. Tech journalist Ramona Pringle discusses the effects of social media on teens.
50 minutes, 29 seconds
Episode Artwork

Canada's women's soccer team speaks out about pay equity; the Great Backyard Bird Count

Today, Canada's women's national soccer team plays its first match in the She Believes Cup. But the team has been speaking out about pay equity, in a dispute with Canada Soccer. Next, the simple joy of bird watching. This weekend, you can use it to help out science, as the Great Backyard Bird Count gets underway.
50 minutes, 23 seconds
Episode Artwork

Clarifying distracted-driving laws. Food insecurity.

Jenn Teryn, a lawyer at McCullough Watt Sutton Lynskey & Hodson in Victoria, and Rob Wilkinson, the Director of Community Partnerships for Traffic Injury Research Foundation in Ottawa, discuss distracted driving. Lenore Newman, director of the Food and Agriculture Institute at the University of the Fraser Valley, discusses food insecurity.
50 minutes, 5 seconds
Episode Artwork

How British Columbians are helping the relief efforts in Turkey and Syria; What mental health supports and substance use services are needed in B.C.?

Amy Bell is in the host's chair today. As we go to air, more than 11,000 people are confirmed to have died in the earthquakes in Turkey and Syria. British Columbians have rallied to support the relief efforts in that region. Search and Rescue teams from Burnaby are among those who are on the ground, and we hear an update on their activities. We also hear of Vancouverites who have been organizing donation drives as the need for urgent supplies continues to grow. Also on the program: as the provinces decriminalizes the supply of small amounts of illicit drugs, we discuss what further steps are needed to ensure treatment is available for those who require it. We discuss that with our panel of guests, and listeners share their experiences.
47 minutes, 20 seconds
Episode Artwork

Parts of B.C. are in for a winter storm; Are you tipping more these days?

Parts of B.C. are in for a blast of winter weather. We get an update from Environment Canada then talk to a shelter about how they're preparing. Next a new survey shows some people want to drop the option for a tip when paying and include it in the total price. We're asking for your thoughts.
50 minutes, 6 seconds
Episode Artwork

Three years on, what pandemic habits have you kept? And how to cope with the toll of burnout.

Dan Burritt is in the host's chair today. It's three years since public health restrictions gathered pace in B.C. in response to the rapid escalation in the province's COVID case count. Amid the head-spinning news cycle, life for British Columbians was altered drastically. And for many, they have maintained some of the new habits and routines that were spawned at that time. We discuss that with listeners, and infectious diseases specialist, Dr. Brian Conway. In the second half, we discuss the consequences of burnout, how to recognize if you're at risk, and what steps you can take to mitigate its effects. Vancouver's Dr Susan Biali Haas is a medical doctor who specializes in this topic, and she joined us to share her personal experiences and advice.
45 minutes, 21 seconds
Episode Artwork

How the federal budget will address affordability and climate issues; The significance of Ramadan

Amy Bell is hosting today. Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland's budget today is being billed as a balance between green investments, helping the vulnerable and keeping spending under control - but will it be enough in an uncertain economy? We hear from listeners, and our panel of experts. And Ramadan has begun for Muslims this year with many fasting from sunrise to sunset each day. We'll talk about the significance of this holy time, and how you can support friends and colleagues who observe it.
50 minutes, 30 seconds
Episode Artwork

LNG project gets greenlight; How nutrition impacts your mental health

Dan Burritt is hosting today. The provincial government has now given the environmental green light to a massive, First-Nation owned LNG project in B.C. Supporters say it will bring economic reconciliation, and produced lower emissions than other projects. Critics wonder if it will get built at all. We hear from both perspectives. And in our second half, we look at the link between nutrition and mental health, and how what you feed your body impacts your mind and more.
46 minutes, 37 seconds
Episode Artwork

1st Canadian to orbit the moon; Province's plan to tackle housing crisis; B.C. government's new flexible working policy takes effect

Michelle Eliot is back in the host's chair today. We begin with NASA's announcement of the first Canadian astronaut to take part in a lunar mission. We hear from an expert and ask listeners for their thoughts on space exploration. Then, the province is announcing what it calls an action plan to sped up the delivery of new homes. We get the details from the CBC's Justin McElroy. And in our second half today, the B.C. government's new policy on flexible work takes effect this month. But that's prompting concerns from business owners whose livelihoods depend on the office workers who become their customers. We find out more, and open the phone lines.
49 minutes, 43 seconds
Episode Artwork

Federal government pauses expansion of MAID; Tell us about your DIY projects

The federal government has paused expanding Medical Assistance in Dying for people suffering solely from mental disorders. What would you like to see happen. Next, we're talking DIY - or do it yourself projects. We want to hear about your projects.
49 minutes, 33 seconds
Episode Artwork

New standards for long-term care homes; How to get through a breakup peacefully

Canada has new standards to try and improve long term care. We're asking what improvements you want to see. Next, we're at the end of January - National Breakup Month. We're asking how you got through a breakup, and how to move on while maintaining a relationship with your ex.
50 minutes, 41 seconds
Episode Artwork

Eby wants CSIS briefing on electoral interference; preparing your garden for the arrival of spring

Dan Burritt is our host today. We have more on the allegations of interference by Chinese government officials in Vancouver's municipal election. The Premier, David Eby, says he now wants to hear from Canada's spy agency about the issue. A panel and our listeners weigh in on what ought to be done to better secure our votes on a local, provincial and national level. And in our second half hour, as we embrace the arrival of spring, master gardener Brian Minter helps listeners decide what to plant.
49 minutes, 1 second
Episode Artwork

The future of the Vancouver Folk Festival; Women's heart health

The iconic Vancouver Folk Festival's future still hangs in the balance, and tonight there's a townhall on the issue for it's members. CBC's Grant Lawrence joins us to take your calls. Next, we talk women's heart health. A new report says a lack of knowledge put them at risk.
50 minutes, 41 seconds
Episode Artwork

Earthquake strikes Turkey and Syria; B.C. Throne Speech to focus on housing

Rocked by multiple earthquakes, the international community responds to destruction in Turkey and Syria. We speak with a B.C. teacher whose family was struck with tragedy and we hear from CBC meteorologist Johanna Wagstaffe; and in our 2nd half, the B.C. Legislature is back in session with housing the top of the agenda. UBC professor Tsur Somerville takes your calls on what changes are needed to tackle the housing crisis.
49 minutes, 59 seconds
Episode Artwork

Growing food insecurity in Canada; destigmatizing menopause

More and more Canadians are turning to food charities in Canada. What is needed to address food insecurity? Next, Stigma and shame are preventing women from getting proper care during menopause. we look at ending the taboo.
50 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Donald Trump in court; B.C. municipalities split over provincial housing proposals; Healthy ways to cut food costs

We begin with breaking news in New York, where Donald Trump has surrendered to New York authorities for his appearance in court. We also hear from the Mayors of Oak Bay and the City of Langley, as B.C. moves forward with a housing plan that would effectively end single-family zoning, municipal leaders have voiced both praise and concern over how the sweeping policy might shape the fabric of their communities. And in our second half, as inflation continues to bite, we look at ways of cutting food costs without compromising on nutrition and good health.
49 minutes, 40 seconds
Episode Artwork

Reducing stigma around Alzheimer's Disease

The number of Canadians living with dementia is expected in increase - reaching over a million by 2030. We're asking about your experience caring for a loved one.
49 minutes, 31 seconds
Episode Artwork

Rental demand outpacing stock; How to prevent sports injuries

Metro Vancouver's rental vacancy rate has tightened once again, falling below one percent among purpose built rentals. One of the big factors is migration - internationally and from other parts of Canada. Next, we'll talk about sports injuries and ask how you have been affected.
49 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

A cautionary tale for renters and homeowners on online rental scams and, dustbunnies beware! We have spring cleaning tips to make the task simple and enjoyable.

Paul Legace, poverty law advocate for the Prince Rupert Unemplyment Action Centre and privacy and security expert John Wunderlich, founding board member of global NGO mydate.org, join us to talk about how we can spot and protect ourselves from online rental scams. And then Linda Chu, professional organizer with Out of Chaos organizing solutions joins us to get us into the mood for spring cleaning.
50 minutes, 44 seconds
Episode Artwork

Daylight time sleep.

Dr. Ron Cridland, the medical director at the Kelowna Sleep Clinic, and Rebecca Vigelius, a holistic sleep coach in Abbotsford, discuss sleep issues, as we prepare to lose an hour of sleep to daylight time.
25 minutes, 2 seconds
Episode Artwork

New alcohol use guidelines; new inflation numbers

Dr. Tim Naimi, director of the Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research at the University of Victoria, discusses new Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction guidelines that suggest more than two alcoholic drinks a week may present increased health risks. Earl Davis of BMO Global Asset Management and CBC business columnist Rubina Ahmed-Haq discuss new numbers suggesting inflation may finally be falling -- but prices at the till don't seem to be falling just yet.
50 minutes, 32 seconds
Episode Artwork

Remembering Gino Odjick; accessing healthcare without a family doctor

Friend Marcia McNaughton and fan Troy Sebastian remember the life and legacy of 90s Vancouver Canuck legend Gino Odjick, who died aged 52. CBC medical contributor Dr. Peter Lin discusses how to access healthcare when you don't have a family doctor.
51 minutes, 4 seconds
Episode Artwork

Ottawa found justified in using Emergencies Act; Brian Minter Friday

Justin Paul Rouleau has released the long-awaited report on whether the federal government was justified in its use of the Emergencies Act. Next, it's Brian Minter Friday, he's with us as always to take your gardening questions.
49 minutes, 28 seconds
Episode Artwork

Fresh allegations of interference in Vancouver election; how are you preparing for allergies?

Dan Burritt is hosting today. The show begins with more on the extent of alleged foreign interference in Canada. The Globe and Mail reports that China's consulate general in Vancouver interfered in last year's municipal election in the city. And in our second half hour, as we face into spring, how are you preparing for allergies?
49 minutes, 25 seconds
Episode Artwork

Premiers prepare to discuss federal healthcare funding proposals; The difficult decision faced by dementia patients to stop driving

Amy Bell is our host today. First up: Ottawa's proposed funding plan for healthcare in the provinces offered a fraction of the dollars that Premiers wanted. As they prepare to debate whether to accept Trudeau's offer, are the two sides too far apart? We discuss with former BC Health Minister, Terry Lake, and take your calls. In the second half of Thursday's program: driving can be the stand of independence and mobility for many - but what if it's time for you or a loved one to stay off the roads? We'll look at the difficult discussion around dementia and driving with our guests.
48 minutes, 19 seconds
Episode Artwork

Today marks one year since the war in Ukraine; Do you want a four day work week?

The world is marking one year since the Russian invasion of Ukraine. We're talking about he human toll of the conflict. Next, the B.C. Green Party wants a pilot project to pursue a four day work week. Would you like to see that change in B.C.?
50 minutes, 7 seconds
Episode Artwork

The state of B.C. retail as Nordstrom exits Canada; Brian Minter answers your gardening questions.

We begin Friday's program with retail adviser David Ian Gray, as Nordstrom joins Bed Bath and Beyond as the latest American retailer to pull out of Canada. Then, we go to the PNE in Vancouver, where a two-day Hoobiyee celebration is getting underway. And finally, after a week of cold weather for many in B.C., your gardening questions are answered by our expert Brian Minter.
50 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

David Eby hopes to tackle rental affordability; how to learn a new language

The province hopes to tackle rental affordability and speculation with a new fund aimed at preserving older buildings. What's your experience trying to find a rental? Our next guest can understand 20 languages. We'll ask him for tips about learning a new language.
50 minutes, 34 seconds
Episode Artwork

Interest rate impacts on house prices; Unpredictable backcountry season

The Bank of Canada raises its key interest rate again — but hints that may be it, as the economy starts to slow down, in particular, in the housing market. We're asking: Have you held off on a big purchase like a home? And, it's a tragic season in BC's backcountry. Two more people have died in an avalanche near Revelstoke. Are there now new and unpredictable risks in the mountains?
51 minutes, 42 seconds
Episode Artwork

Vatican repudiates Doctrine of Discovery; Jeopardy! star Mattea Roach wins Canada Reads 2023

Amy Bell is our host today. As the Vatican formally repudiates the theories that were used to justify the seizure of Indigenous lands, we speak with a Métis person and lawyer, and the Regional Chief of the BC Assembly of First Nations, to hear about the harms caused by the doctrines, and what this repudiation six centuries later means to them. And in our second half, Jeopardy! champion Mattea Roach has another win under their belt - this time as the winner of Canada Reads 2023. They championed the graphic memoir Ducks by Kate Beaton. We spoke Roach to find out why.
45 minutes, 30 seconds
Episode Artwork

Added childcare fees; master gardener Brian Minter

Vancouver Sun reporter Katie DeRosa and $10 a Day Child Care campaign spokesperson Sharon Gregson discuss reports of some childcare providers charging additional "optional" fees following new subsidies from the provincial government. Master gardener Brian Minter answers your gardening questions.
50 minutes, 25 seconds
Episode Artwork

Pink Shirt Day; We take your questions on artificial intelligence technology

Today is Pink Shirt Day, which highlights anti-bullying initiatives at schools across the country. Next, it seems artificial intelligence is everywhere now. We take your questions on this new technology.
50 minutes, 56 seconds
Episode Artwork

Live from Nanaimo!

We are in Nanaimo to mark the launch of a new CBC local bureau. We'll meet our new videographer based right here in town. We'll be joined by some of the people and businesses who make this a great place to be. And Singer-songwriter Hayley Sales will join us! Plus, on the open line, we're asking you, who are the local vendors you love?
50 minutes, 51 seconds
Episode Artwork

The rise of hate incidents in B.C. during the pandemic; B.C.'s invasive and noxious plants

Tuesday's program starts with Annie O'Hana, teacher and Indigenous Department Head from Surrey's L.A. Matheson Secondary School, as the BC Human Rights Commissioner Kasari Govender presents her office's recommendations on how to tackle the rise in hate incidents over the pandemic. Then we carefully tread into noxious plant territory discussing giant hogweed with Gail Wallin, Executive Director of the Invasive Species Council of BC.
51 minutes
Episode Artwork

It's Trans Day of Visibility; Brian Minter answers more of your gardening questions

Amy Bell is our host today. It's Trans Day of Visibility - a day to celebrate and honour transgender people. But what does this day mean for members of the Trans community? And how can you best support your Transgender friends and family members - not just today, but every day? We discuss with our panel. And in the second half of our show, Brian Minter answers more of your questions, and helps take the guess work out of your garden.
50 minutes, 25 seconds
Episode Artwork

Housing initiatives central in B.C. Budget; the province becomes the first to make prescription contraception free

As expected, housing is central in the BC Budget. Two measures are getting attention- a new renters tax credit, and an increase in the shelter allowance. Will these credits and benefits make a difference? What else would you like to have seen, to ease the pressure of housing costs? Next, B.C. becomes the first province to make prescription contraception free for all residents. What will this mean for you?
51 minutes, 2 seconds
Episode Artwork

Would a grocery rebate help struggling families? And how can we keep local farming sustainable?

Amy Bell is in the host's chair today. CBC News has learned that Tuesday's federal budget will include a grocery rebate measure aimed at lower income Canadians to help address the affordability crisis. We'll speak to a local parent to find out if a rebate is what her family needs. And before you can buy it, someone has to grow it. In the second half of our show, we speak with two farmers about the future of their industry.
51 minutes, 18 seconds
Episode Artwork

Trudeau pitches $196B health-care plan; How prepared is B.C. for a major earthquake?

We speak to a family physician and a health policy researcher, as news breaks that the federal government is prepared to increase health-care spending by an eye-popping $196.1 billion over the next decade - a cash injection Ottawa is pitching as a generational fix for an ailing system. And in our second half, we're seeing more and more images of the devastation caused by the earthquakes in Turkey and Syria. It's renewed concerns from people worried about what could happen if and when "the big one" hits here in B.C. Seismologist Alison Bird takes listeners' calls on how prepared our province is for a major quake.
47 minutes, 35 seconds
Episode Artwork

Vancouver stabbing fuels public safety concerns; Who should keep the pet after a separation?

Amy Bell is our host today. After a deadly stabbing on a busy Vancouver street, many people are worried about the impact of crime in their communities. So what can be done to help make people feel safe on the streets where they live? And in our second half, breaking up is hard to do, and especially when there is a pet involved. We'll talk to the experts about who gets the pets when a couple splits.
51 minutes, 8 seconds