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All Of It Profile

All Of It

English, Political, 1 season, 1457 episodes, 2 days, 20 hours, 51 minutes
About
ALL OF IT is a show about culture and its consumers. ALL OF IT is a show about culture and context. ALL OF IT is a show about culture and the culture. Our aim is to engage the thinkers, doers, makers, and creators, about the what and why of their work. People make the culture and we hope, need, and want the WNYC community to be a part of our show. As we build a community around ALL OF IT, we know that every guest and listener has an opinion. We won’t always agree, but our varied perspectives and diversity of experience is what makes New York City great. ALL OF IT will be both companion for and curator of the myriad culture this city has to offer. In the words of Cristina De Rossi, anthropologist at Barnet and Southgate College, London: "Culture encompasses religion, food, what we wear, how we wear it, our language, marriage, music, what we believe is right or wrong, how we sit at the table, how we greet visitors, how we behave with loved ones, and a million other things." ...In other words, ALL OF IT. --- Join us for ALL OF IT with Alison Stewart, weekdays from 12:00 - 2:00PM on WNYC.
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What Are You Doing This Weekend?

Sometimes on Fridays we ask you about your weekend plans, so call us with what you've got going on! Plus, hear what's in store for this weekend from members of team All Of It, our WNYC colleagues, and other listeners.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
7/19/202412 minutes, 21 seconds
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A Black Shark Scientist on How to Make Marine Biology More Diverse

Marine biologist and shark specialist Jasmin Graham faced some barriers to entry as a Black woman attempting to follow her dream of studying sharks. She chronicles that story, and tells us more about sharks, in her new memoir, Sharks Don't Sink: Adventures of a Rogue Shark Scientist. The book also discusses Jasmin's role in the foundation of Minorities in Shark Sciences (MISS) a group working to provide support for other aspiring marine biologists of color.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar  
7/19/202421 minutes, 45 seconds
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'Hollywoodgate' Shows How the Taliban Became a Military Force

A new documentary follows the Taliban in the aftermath of the United States withdrawal from Afghanistan and how Taliban forces occupied the Hollywood Gate complex, said to be a former CIA base. Discovering new military technology there, the Taliban slowly morphs from a militia into a robust military group. Director Ibrahim Nash'at discusses this risky filmmaking process and his new film, "Hollywoodgate," in theaters today.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
7/19/202427 minutes, 59 seconds
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Public Song Project Winner Juliette Reilly and Judge Shanta Thake

As part of our weeklong unveiling of winners of the 2024 Public Song Project, Juliette Reilly joins us to discuss "Summer Sang," her song adaptation of Edna St Vincent Millay's poem, "What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why." Plus, Lincoln Center's chief artistic officer Shanta Thake joins us to discuss takeaways from the 2024 Public Song Project and share some of her personal favorite submissions and runners up. She also helps to preview WNYC's Public Song Project: The People's Concert at The Underground at Jaffe Drive, on Saturday at 6 PM, a free show that's part of Lincoln Center's Summer for the City series.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
7/19/202439 minutes, 30 seconds
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What's the Best Book of the 21st Century?

What's the best book of the 21st century so far? Last week, the New York Times attempted to answer that question, putting together a list of "The 100 Best Books of the 21st Century." This highly debated list has caused a stir among literary lovers, so we've invited Gilbert Cruz, editor of the New York Times Book Review, to discuss the list and defend the rankings. Plus, we take your calls about the best book of the 21st century.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar 
7/18/202426 minutes, 57 seconds
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The Woman Behind the Science of FBI Criminal Profiling

While the profiling of serial killers and other violent criminals has been the subject of countless film and TV projects, a new docuseries, "Mastermind: To Think Like a Killer,"  spotlights the work of Dr. Ann Burgess, the woman who helped pioneer the science of criminal profiling. Burgess and showrunner Dani Sloane join to discuss.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
7/18/202427 minutes
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Savoring Summer Cocktails

We've talked about ice cream, sandwiches and ways to stay cool as this summer has entered with a bang. Today we discuss cocktails to enjoy this summer, from the classics to trending with Carey Jones and John McCarthy, authors of the book, Every Cocktail Has a Twist.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
7/18/202423 minutes, 58 seconds
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Public Song Project Winner Mal Petty and Judge John Schaefer

As part of our weeklong unveiling of winners of the 2024 Public Song Project, Mal Petty joins us to discuss their song adaptation of Margery Swett's poem "Winter Wife." Plus, WNYC New Sounds and Soundcheck host John Schaefer joins us to discuss takeaways from the 2024 Public Song Project and share some of his personal favorite submissions and runners up.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
7/18/202423 minutes, 2 seconds
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Public Song Project Winner Moontripp, And Judge Isabel Kim

As part of our weeklong unveiling of winners of the 2024 Public Song Project, we're joined by Ashleigh Prather and Manish Ayachit, a husband-and-wife duo who record and perform as Moontripp. They share their version of Irving Berlin's "What'll I Do."Plus, Isabel Kim, associate director of Joe's Pub, joins us to discuss takeaways as a judge for the 2024 Public Song Project and share some of her personal favorite submissions and runners up.
7/17/202425 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Alleged Murderer Known as 'The Witch of New York' (Women Behaving Badly)

In 19th century Staten Island, a heavily pregnant woman named Polly Bodine was accused of murdering her own sister-in-law, and her baby niece. The crime and subsequent trials set off a media firestorm in New York, with luminaries like Edgar Allen Poe and Walt Whitman covering the case. We speak with author Alex Hortis about his new book, The Witch of New York: The Trials of Polly Bodine and the Cursed Birth of Tabloid Justice  as part of our series, "Women Behaving Badly," a tongue-in-cheek look at unruly women in New York history. 
7/17/202429 minutes, 46 seconds
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'Didi' Explores a Taiwanese-American Teen's Coming of Age Journey

Oscar-nominated filmmaker Sean Wang's latest feature film, "Didi," is a slice of life story about Chris, an impressionable teenager living in Fremont, California. It's summer, and the 13-year-old spends his time aimlessly skateboarding and flirting with his crush on Myspace. Chris often clashes with his immigrant mother, whose rigid expectations for her son clashes with his own desires and ambitions. Wang joins to discuss his feature directorial debut, which is out in theaters on July 26. 
7/17/202426 minutes, 10 seconds
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Pete Wells on His 12 Years as a Restaurant Critic

After 12 years, New York Times restaurant critic Pete Wells is leaving the table and shining a light on the health concerns that face many food critics. He joins us next to reflect on over a decade of reviewing food in New York.
7/17/202418 minutes, 51 seconds
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Susan Seidelman's Memoir

Film director Susan Seidelman was one of the trailblazing female directors of the 1980s, working on classics like "Smithereens"  and "Desperately Seeking Susan," and even directing the pilot episode of "Sex and the City." She chronicles her life and career in her new memoir, Desperately Seeking Something: A Memoir About Movies, Mothers, and Material Girls. She joins us to discuss.
7/16/202430 minutes, 20 seconds
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Public Song Project: Love? Said The Commander, & DJ Rekha

As part of our weeklong unveiling of winners of the 2024 Public Song Project, we're joined by Kate Hall and Chris Bishop, who perform as Love? said the Commander. We hear their song adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson's poem "Bed in Summer."Then, DJ Rekha joins us to discuss takeaways from the 2024 Public Song Project and share some of their personal favorite submissions and runners up. They also share their own musical submission to the project. 
7/16/202426 minutes, 57 seconds
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'Oh, Mary!' on Broadway

In Cole Escola's hit play "Oh, Mary!" they star as a deranged version of Mary Todd Lincoln, whose dream in life is to be a cabaret star. Mary's husband Abraham gets her acting lessons to keep her from bothering him, which sets off a chain of events which ultimately leads to his own assassination. Following a successful off-Broadway run, the show is now running at the Lyceum Theatre through September 15. Director Sam Pinkleton joins us to discuss the Broadway transfer, alongside actor Conrad Ricamora, who stars as Abraham Lincoln.
7/16/202423 minutes, 55 seconds
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'Cats: The Jellicle Ball'

"Cats" is back in town, but with a makeover. Instead of ballet dancing and cat costumes, "Cats: The Jellicle Ball"  features a disco ball, house music, avant-garde costumes, and a whole lot of voguing, dipping and sashaying. Choreographer Omari Wiles and gender consultant and dramaturg Josephine Kearns share how they blended New York's ballroom culture with a Broadway classic. "Cats: The Jellicle Ball"  is running now at the Perelman Arts Center through August 11.
7/16/202419 minutes, 22 seconds
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'Join or Die' Documentary Traces History of Decline in American Community Connections

A new documentary, "Join or Die,"  tells the history of the decline in community and connection in America, and the consequences of increasing social isolation. Sibling directors Pete and Rebecca Davis discuss their film, which is screening at Firehouse Cinema from July 19 through July 25.
7/15/202421 minutes, 36 seconds
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Public Song Project Winner Candice Hoyes

As part of our weeklong unveiling of winners of the 2024 Public Song Project, Candice Hoyes joins us to discuss her take on Bessie Smith's "Young Woman's Blues."Plus, All Of It producer Simon Close discusses some of the submissions from this year's project, previews the upcoming concert series at Lincoln Center on July 20th, and shares a bonus Public Song track from the team behind Radiolab's  children's' podcast Terrestrials.
7/15/202422 minutes, 35 seconds
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A New Book Confronts the Hidden Mental Health Crisis in Women's Sports

In a new book, The Price She Pays, two experts in mental health discuss the struggles women face in sports, including disordered eating, substance use, depression and abuse. Co-authors Katie Steele, a former D1 athlete and licensed therapist, and Dr. Tiffany Brown, a therapist who works with student athletes, join us to discuss.
7/15/202428 minutes, 34 seconds
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'Vivian Maier: Unseen Work' at Fotografiska

New York City photographer Vivian Maier was an unknown talent in her lifetime, and worked as a nanny around the city. After her death, thousands of her photographers were discovered, and she became known as a real talent in the art world. A new exhibit at Fotografiska represents the first major retrospective of her work in the United States. Anne Morin, curator of the exhibit and director of diChroma photography, and Sophie Wright, executive director of Fotografiska, join us to discuss, Vivian Maier: Unseen Work, which runs at Fotografiska through September 29.
7/15/202429 minutes, 20 seconds
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How to Have Great Conversations

It seems that the circumstances of life today make it harder to meet new people, talk to strangers, and have good conversation. Science writer David Robson has written a new book about social connection, The Laws of Connection: 13 Social Strategies That Will Transform Your Life, and he tells us more about the science behind conversation and how to go about transforming our daily conversations to get the most out of life. Plus, we take your calls.This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
7/12/202427 minutes, 20 seconds
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How To Travel With Friends (And Still Be Friends With Them After)

Planning a successful trip with a friend group can be tricky to master. There are differing travel styles, personality types and financial constraints to consider. Nick Leighton, host of the etiquette podcast, Were You Raised By Wolves?, joins us to discuss how to execute these without a hitch, and take listener calls on their best and worst friend travel stories.This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
7/12/202423 minutes, 59 seconds
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A Teen Goes Missing at Summer Camp in 'The God of the Woods'

After her bestselling thriller Long Bright River, Liz Moore returns with a new mystery. In The God of the Woods, a teenage girl goes missing at the Adirondack summer camp that her parents own. What's even more strange is that her older brother also vanished years ago, and has never been found. Moore joins us to discuss this mystery novel, which Kousha has selected for the Summer Reading Challenge in the category "A book about or set in New York." Click here to join the challenge!This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
7/12/202423 minutes, 46 seconds
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'Lady in the Lake'

The new limited series on Apple TV+, "Lady in the Lake" tells the story of how the families of two women become entangled when a young girl goes missing in 1966 Baltimore. The director and showrunner Alma Har'el and stars Y'lan Noel and Byron Bowers join to discuss.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
7/12/202426 minutes, 12 seconds
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Public Song Project Winner Previews

Producer of the Public Song Project, Simon Close, discusses the incredible submissions from this year's project, and previews the upcoming concert series at Lincoln Center on July 20th. 
7/12/202410 minutes, 40 seconds
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Shakespeare in the Park in Harlem

This summer, The Classical Theatre of Harlem is putting on a free production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" for Uptown Shakespeare in the Park. Director Carl Cofield discusses the production, which is set during the Harlem Renaissance and has performances through July 28.
7/11/202418 minutes, 9 seconds
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How to Care for Your Cast Iron Cookware

Cast iron cookware has a well-deserved reputation for being a kitchen workhorse, going easily from stovetop to oven. And like anything with a cult following, how to take care of it is subject to a lot of debate. Daniel Gritzer is the senior culinary director at Serious Eats, and he joins us to discuss how to season your cast iron and talk about how he uses the cookware.
7/11/202430 minutes, 44 seconds
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Documentary Follows Quadriplegic E-Sports Group

The new film "Quad Gods" follows a group of New York City quadriplegic men who form an E-Sports team that helps assist them in their recovery. Documentarian Jess Jacklin joins us to discuss the film, alongside Richard Jacobs, one of the film's subjects."Quad Gods" is out now on MAX.
7/11/202419 minutes, 16 seconds
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Chicocurlyhead Listening Party

Chicocurlyhead's unique mix of R&B and Latin music helped him stand out as an emerging artist from Atlanta. Remezcla called him "a rising Spanglish singer ready to take over." Last month, he dropped a new EP, NEVERENDING ROADTRIP. Chicocurlyhead joins us to discuss the new project and his career in music so far.
7/11/202422 minutes, 30 seconds
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'Sleeping Beauties: Reawakening Fashion' Brings Old Pieces to Life at the Met

The latest exhibit at the Met's Costume Institute brings old pieces of fashion to life through innovative techniques, including holograms. Andrew Bolton, curator in charge of The Costume Institute, joins us to discuss Sleeping Beauties: Reawakening Fashion, on view now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through September 2.
7/10/202425 minutes, 59 seconds
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K'wan's 'False Idols: A Reluctant King Novel'

In the follow-up to author K’wan's novel,The Reluctant King, Maureen, the former matriarch of Manhattan’s King crime family, devises a plan to reclaim power after being exiled to Brooklyn with her son. It's titled, False Idols: A Reluctant King Novel. K’wan joins us to discuss the new release and the battle over the New York City's Five Points.
7/10/202420 minutes, 46 seconds
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Happy 100th Birthday, Caesar Salad!

Just like WNYC, the beloved Caesar salad turns 100 this month. To celebrate the beloved leafy green dish, we're joined by food writer and TV host Pati Jinich. Jinich is author of the recent New York Times article, "The Century-Long Saga of the Caesar Salad," detailing the history and impact of the dish, which originated in Tijuana, Mexico. Plus, we take your calls on your favorite recipes and renditions of the iconic dish.
7/10/202428 minutes, 21 seconds
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When Women Ruled 5th Ave

A new book examines the glamourous cathedrals of retail: the early New York City department stores. When Women Ruled 5th Avenue spotlights three women who helmed the C suites of the major stores, Bonwit Teller, Lord & Taylor and Henri Bendel. Author Julie Satow joins to discuss.
7/10/202421 minutes, 32 seconds
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Previewing the Winners of the Public Song Project

Producer of the Public Song Project, Simon Close, discusses the incredible submissions from this year's project, and previews the upcoming concert series at Lincoln Center on July 20th.  
7/9/20248 minutes, 14 seconds
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Curating Paul McCartney's Photographs at the Brooklyn Museum

Beatlemania is alive and well at the Brooklyn Museum! A current exhibit, Paul McCartney Photographs 1963–64: Eyes of the Storm, displays Paul McCartney's photographs taken during the height of their newfound fame. Curator Catherine Futter joins us to discuss the exhibit.
7/9/202414 minutes, 44 seconds
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Taffy Brodesser-Akner's New Novel, 'Long Island Compromise'

The new novel from Taffy Brodesser-Akner follows a very wealthy Long Island family coping with the aftermath of a kidnapping scheme. She joins us to discuss the book, Long Island Compromise, which is out today! She will be speaking tonight with the New York Public Library at 7 pm. Alison has selected Long Island Compromise for our Summer Reading Challenge in the category "a book about or set in New York." Click here to join our Summer Reading Challenge! 
7/9/202435 minutes, 19 seconds
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Yasmin Zaher's Debut Novel 'The Coin'

The protagonist in Yasmin Zaher's debut novel, The Coin, is a wealthy Palestinian woman with impeccable style and meticulous hygiene. She teaches at a school for underprivileged boys, where her eccentric methods often cross boundaries. The book follows the protagonist's intense unravelling, and her desire to regain control of her life. Zaher joins us in studio to discuss the book, which is out today.  Alison has selected The Coin for our Summer Reading Challenge in the category "a book by a debut novelist. Clickhere to join our Summer Reading Challenge! 
7/9/202414 minutes, 24 seconds
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Recovering From Domestic Violence in 'Pre-Existing Condition'

A new play from actor Marin Ireland tells the story of a woman processing the aftermath of a relationship that ended with domestic violence. The lead role is played in rotation by multiple actors, including Maria Dizzia, who also directs the show. Ireland and Dizzia join us to discuss "Pre-Existing Condition," which is running now at Connely Theater through August 3.
7/9/202428 minutes, 20 seconds
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A Portrait of a Psych Unit at Zucker Hillside Hospital in Queens

A new documentary provides an inside look at one of the only inpatient units in the U.S. that treats young adults for serious mental health issues. Directors Lindsey Megrue and Alexandra Shiva join clinical psychologist Dr. Laura Braider to discuss, "One South: Portrait of a Psych Unit," available on Max. 
7/8/202421 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Story of a Gilded Age Jewish Crime Boss (Women Behaving Badly)

In Gilded Age New York, a Jewish woman named Fredericka Mandelbaum was able to become fantastically wealthy by running a crime syndicate. We learn how "Marm" Mandelbaum became a notorious crime boss from Margalit Fox, author of the new book, The Talented Mrs. Mandelbaum: The Rise and Fall of an American Organized-Crime Boss. It's the launch of our July series "Women Behaving Badly," a tongue-in-cheek title for our look at unruly women of New York history.
7/8/202428 minutes, 2 seconds
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‘P-Valley’-Inspired Docuseries ‘Down in the Valley’ Shows the Real South

A new "P-Valley" inspired docuseries from creator Katori Hall and star Nicco Annan shows viewers a real version of the Deep South, from the queer nightlife scene in Dallas, TX to the Hoodoo practitioners of Memphis, TN. Both Hall and Annan join us to discuss the show, "Down in the Valley," which premiered on Starz last week.
7/8/202415 minutes, 28 seconds
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100 Works of Art for 100 Years of WNYC

In honor of WNYC's 100th birthday, All Of It is celebrating 100 pieces of art in New York City. Each month we'll speak with a tastemaker in the arts world about their favorites. The premiere segment features New York Times art critic Will Heinrich who shares 10 pieces he thinks all New Yorkers should see.
7/8/202434 minutes, 2 seconds
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Summer Fun: Best Local Ice Cream Parlors

[REBROADCAST FROM June 19, 2024] Eater NY editor Melissa McCart talks about where to scoop up the best ice cream in the city and take calls from listeners to share their favorites.*This conversation was guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
7/5/202422 minutes, 8 seconds
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Summer Fun: Cocktails To Celebrate The Season

[REBROADCAST FROM July 23, 2021] Food & Wine senior food editor Mary-Frances Heck joins us to talk summer cocktails, recipes, and trends.This conversation is guest-hosted by Kerry Nolan.
7/5/202413 minutes
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Summer Fun: Science Tips To Beat The Heat

[REBROADCAST FROM June 20, 2024] We cover some news-you-can-use and crowdsource tips from listeners on how to beat the heat. We're also joined by Annie Colbert, editor in chief of Popular Science, to talk about the science of temperature and extreme heat, and to explain how some of these strategies work.
7/5/202416 minutes, 46 seconds
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Summer Fun: Travel For Foodies

[REBROADCAST FROM May 30, 2024] It’s officially summer travel season. If you’re thinking about planning a trip to sample some local cuisine along the Eastern Seaboard (or beyond) we’ll share some suggestions of where to check out great food with Hunter Lewis, editor in chief of Food and Wine.
7/5/202421 minutes, 20 seconds
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Summer Fun: The All Of It Summer Reading Challenge

[REBROADCAST FROM July 1, 2024] This summer, from July 1st to the end of Labor Day weekend, we are challenging YOU, our listeners, to complete a summer reading challenge. Just like in school, but for fun!Sign up with the Google Form here and receive a little gift for participating. Then, select and read at least one book in any four of the following categories...A classic you’ve been meaning to get toSomething by a debut novelistA book recommended by a friendA book about or set in New YorkA book translated from another languageA book being turned into a TV series or movieA book you heard about on All Of ItYou can download and fill out or print this PDF form to keep track of your selections! You can also share your selections with us, and keep us updated on your summer reading progress, by tagging us in posts on Instagram, and we’ll repost you! Tag us @allofitwnyc and use the hashtag #AOISummerReadingChallenge. Once you’ve completed the challenge, we’ll follow up about your selections to receive another prize! All summer long, our hosts Alison Stewart and Kousha Navidar will be completing the challenge along with you, so tune in to the show for some great recommendations. Plus, some special guests will be sharing their selections as well. And if you’re looking for some inspiration to get you started, below are some suggestions from All Of It and Get Lit producer Jordan Lauf.  Happy reading!
7/5/202414 minutes, 6 seconds
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Summer Fun: Cooking For Hot Weather

[REBROADCAST FROM June 2, 2022] The summer is here, which means more opportunities for outdoor gatherings, picnics, and vacation cooking projects. But also, because of the heat, you may not to want to have that oven or stove on as long...Emily Weinstein, food and cooking editor for the New York Times, joins to talk all things summer cooking, and take your cooking questions and calls.
7/5/202414 minutes, 46 seconds
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The Final Years of Frederick Douglass (Full Bio)

[REBROADCAST FROM February 26, 2021] We wrap up February’s installment of the "Full Bio" series with a look at the last years of Frederick Douglass’s life, including his experience as minister and consul general to Haiti. Historian David W. Blight, author of Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom, describes the reaction to Frederick Douglass’s death in February of 1895 as well as why Douglass’s second marriage to a woman named Helen Pitts became one of the biggest scandals in 19th century America.
7/4/202415 minutes, 36 seconds
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Frederick Douglass and His Relationship with Lincoln (Full Bio)

[REBROADCAST FROM February 25, 2021] For the fifth installment of February’s “Full Bio” series, historian David W. Blight discusses Frederick Douglass’s political work fighting for abolition and suffrage. We look at his allegiance to the Republican Party, including his working relationship with Abraham Lincoln, and why Andrew Johnson was so dismissive of Douglass. 
7/4/202415 minutes, 21 seconds
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Frederick Douglass and His Family (Full Bio)

[REBROADCAST FROM February 24, 2021] In the fourth installment of our February “Full Bio” series, we look at Frederick Douglass’s family and friendships. Historian David W. Blight talks about Douglass’s first wife, Anna, their five children (four of whom lived to adulthood), and his long and turbulent friendship with German feminist and abolitionist Otillie Assing.
7/4/202416 minutes, 45 seconds
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Frederick Douglass the Abolitionist (Full Bio)

[REBROADCAST FROM February 23, 2021] For the third installment of our February "Full Bio" series, historian David W. Blight describes what made Frederick Douglass such an engaging speaker that he became one of the most powerful voices in 19th century America. Plus, we look at how the prominent abolitionist’s views on slavery evolved in the 1830’s and 1840’s. Blight’s Pulitzer Prize-winning biography is titled, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom. 
7/4/202421 minutes, 27 seconds
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Frederick Douglass Escapes Slavery (Full Bio)

[REBROADCAST FROM February 22, 2021] We continue with our "Full Bio" series with historian David W. Blight, who joins us to discuss his 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom. In this installment, we learn how Douglass escaped slavery and fled to the North.
7/4/202413 minutes, 36 seconds
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Frederick Douglass Learns to Read (Full Bio)

[REBROADCAST FROM FEBRUARY 22, 2021] We present the full conversation from February's installment of our “Full Bio” series with historian David Blight about his book, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom, which won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for History. Blight used new information drawn from private collections to explore the work and life of Douglass. We start with a look at Douglass’s early life as an enslaved person, how he learned to read, and how he escaped to the North from Baltimore in 1838.
7/4/202413 minutes, 58 seconds
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Mo Rocca Explores Famous Late-in-life Debuts and Triumphs

Humorist and Journalist Mo Rocca's new book is called Roctogenarians: Late in Life Debuts, Comebacks, and Triumphs, which spotlights people like Colonel Sanders, Frank Lloyd Wright and Henri Matisse, whose accomplishments as older folks demonstrate that age is indeed just a number. He joins to share stories and insights from the book, and listeners call in to share their "late in life" triumphs.  
7/3/202430 minutes
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Planning a Birthday Party This Summer?

The summer is a great time for a birthday party, especially your kid's birthday. You walk in any New York City park on a given weekend, and you'll see crowds of parents and kids celebrating. Writer Laura Fenton recently wrote the article, "How to Throw a Child’s Park Birthday Party," for New York Magazine, and she gives us party planning recommendations and we take your calls and questions. 
7/3/202424 minutes, 23 seconds
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Documentarian Penny Lane on Donating a Kidney to a Stranger

When documentarian Penny Lane decided to donate her kidney to a complete stranger, her friends and family couldn't understand her decision. So she decided to make a documentary about the process. She joins Alison (a fellow kidney donor!) to discuss the film "Confessions of a Good Samaritan," which is in theaters now. 
7/3/202425 minutes, 39 seconds
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'VOICES: a sacred sisterscape,' An Audio Play Centering Black Women's Stories

A new audio play presented by V-Day, the global activist movement to end violence against all women, shares the stories of Black women across the diaspora. Playwright, author and V-Day founder V (formerly Eve Ensler) joins us alongside playwright, actress, and producer Hollis Heath to discuss, VOICES: a sacred sisterscape. 
7/3/202421 minutes, 47 seconds
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'Farming While Black' Spotlights Farmers

The new documentary,"Farming While Black," explores the triumphs and challenges of being a Black agricultural worker and farm-owner. Director Mark Decena and farmer and subject Karen Washington join us to discuss the film.
7/2/202418 minutes, 43 seconds
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Kenny Leon and Tory Kittles on 'Home'

The new Broadway revival of the 1979 play "Home" stars Tory Kittles a Cephus Miles, a rural farmer who, after being released from prison for draft-dodging, moves up north to the big city. Kittles and director Kenny Leon join us to discuss the show, which is running at the Todd Haimes Theatre through July 21.
7/2/202431 minutes, 14 seconds
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Bobby Finger's Second Novel, 'Four Squares'

Bobby Finger, author and co-host of the Who? Weekly podcast returns with his second novel, Four Squares. The story is set in the West Village of the 1990s, where Artie, a gay man working a tedious advertising job meets the love of his life, Abraham. The story interweaves through several stages of Art's life, including as an elderly man seeking belonging and connection in New York City. Finger joins in studio to discuss the novel.
7/2/202422 minutes, 37 seconds
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Podcasts to Listen to This Summer

Looking for a new podcast to enjoy during your commute, by the pool or on vacation? Lauren Passell, editor of Podcast The Newsletter, joins to recommend her favorites to check out and we take your calls.
7/2/202428 minutes, 59 seconds
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Alison and Her Neurosurgeon Discuss Her Emergency Brain Surgery

In February of this year, our host Alison Stewart underwent emergency brain surgery, which revealed a serious infection pressing on her language center. Now, she's back on the live show, and ready to talk about her surgery and recovery process. She kicks things off by interviewing her own neurosurgeon, Dr. Randy D'Amico of Lenox Hill Hospital, about her case and the process of treating her infection (which included AWAKE brain surgery!).
7/1/202435 minutes, 17 seconds
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Sebastian Junger's Near-Death Experience, and His Vision of an Afterlife

Journalist Sebastian Junger nearly died a few years ago when an aneurysm in his abdomen ruptured. As he lay dying on the operating table, a vision of his dead father caused him to question for the first time the possibility of an afterlife. He joins us to discuss his memoir about the experience, In My Time of Dying: How I Came Face to Face with the Idea of an Afterlife.
7/1/202434 minutes, 59 seconds
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Launching All Of It's Summer Reading Challenge!

We're launching a summer reading challenge! From now until the end of Labor Day weekend, we're challenging our listeners to read four books in any of the following categories:A classic you’ve been meaning to get toSomething by a debut novelistA book recommended by a friendA book about or set in New YorkA book translated from another languageA book being turned into a TV series or movieA book you heard about on All Of ItTo sign up for the challenge (and receive a prize!) click here.To get you started, All Of It and Get Lit producer Jordan Lauf joins us for some recommendations in each category.
7/1/202415 minutes, 10 seconds
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Managing Unexpected Situations

Our host Alison was on an extended medical leave following emergency brain surgery, and she had to deal with a lot of new, frustrating, and unexpected situations. She speaks with psychotherapist Lori Gottlieb, author and co-host of the Dear Therapists podcast and “Dear Therapist” column for The Atlantic.
7/1/202415 minutes, 55 seconds
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Things To Do On Long Island

From beaches to festivals to capybara enclosures, we take your recommendations for the best things to do on Long Island in the summertime… and we hear some recommendations from Newsday reporter and Long Island resident, Beth Whitehouse.*Guest hosted by David Furst*
6/28/202426 minutes, 49 seconds
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Is NYC the Greatest City in the World?

Earlier this week, one of our producers, pointed out a Time Out New York article titled, “NYC ranked best city in the U.S. in a new study”The article’s subtitle? “We already knew—and now you know as well.”We agreed -- but we aren't closed minded -- so we put it to listeners as part of our "Small Stakes, Big Opinions" series. The question on the table: is New York, in fact, the greatest city in the world? If not, what is? Comedian and author Josh Gondelman joined us to discuss.*Guest hosted by David Furst*
6/28/202430 minutes, 34 seconds
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'40 Acres and a Lie' Series from 'Reveal'

A new podcast series from Reveal revisits the history of 40 Acres and a Mule: the land grants given to recently freed slaves after the Civil War that were later taken away. 40 Acres and a Lie tells the stories of those freed men and women who lost their land, their present descendants, and the Americans who own and live on the land today. Reporters Alexia Fernández Campbell and April Simpson discuss the series, which airs its final episode Sunday on WNYC at 11am, and wherever you get podcasts.*Guest hosted by David Furst*
6/28/202422 minutes, 53 seconds
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Sweet Treats, Italian Style

James-Beard nominated baker Renato Poliafito joins to discuss his latest cookbook, Dolci! American Baking with an Italian Accent. It includes a mashup of Italian and American standards from Aperol Spritz Cake, to Malted Tiramisu, as well as savory treats like Cacio e Pepe Arancini. And listeners, call with any baking questions!*Guest hosted by David Furst*
6/28/202420 minutes, 49 seconds
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Trans Stories in Cinema (Pride on Screen)

Throughout cinema history, trans characters have usually been murdered, made into a joke, or viewed as threats to the normal order — relegated to a lost highway of corpses, fools, and monsters. For the last installment of our Pride on Screen series, we look at the past, present and future of transgender stories in cinema with Willow Maclay and Caden Gardner, the authors of the book, Corpses, Fools and Monsters.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/27/202423 minutes
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Tiny Habits Perform Live

[REBROADCAST FROM April 8, 2024] The close harmony trio Tiny Habits formed at Berklee College of Music in 2022 and have quickly become a fan favorite in the world of indie folk-pop. Cinya Khan, Maya Rae, and Judah Mayowa join to perform live in our studio.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
6/27/202424 minutes, 3 seconds
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How Sea Creatures Rely on Sound to Survive

Instead of thinking of the ocean as a silent body of water, a new book demonstrates how important sound is in the lives of sea creatures. Author and science writer Amorina Kingdon joins us to discuss, Sing Like Fish: How Sound Rules Life Under Water.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/27/202425 minutes, 26 seconds
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Holland Taylor and Ana Villafañe Star as Politicians of Different Generations in 'N/A'

In the new play "N/A," Holland Taylor stars as N, a longtime Democratic Representative and former Speaker of the House, who spars with A, played by Ana Villafañe. A is an ambitious and progressive newly elected Representative from New York, who thinks it's time for a new generation to take control. The play follows their career trajectories, and their lengthy debates about governing and the future of America. Taylor, Villafañe, and playwright Mario Correa join us to discuss the show, which is running at Lincoln Center through August 4.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/27/202428 minutes, 21 seconds
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Queer History Walking Tours of NYC Neighborhoods

As Pride Month comes to a close, we speak to the team behind the NYC Queer History Walking Tour. They give guided tours of the Lower East Side and the East Village, featuring venues of importance that played a part in shaping LGBTQ+ life in the city, including theaters, bookstores, and nightclubs. Katie Vogel of the Henry Street Settlement, as well as Jimmy Fay and Salonee Bhaman of the Close Friends Collective join us to discuss. *This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen. 
6/26/202420 minutes, 39 seconds
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What Does Pride Mean to You?

This Pride Month, WNYC's community partnerships desk has been asking New Yorkers what Pride means to them, some of whom you've heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Ahead of New York City's Pride March this weekend, George Bodarky, our Community Partnerships editor, joins to discuss the project, listen to voices he recorded, and take your calls to hear about what Pride means to you.*This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen
6/26/202430 minutes, 47 seconds
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Lucy Kalantari Performs Live From Family Album, 'Creciendo'

Today is the last of day of school in New York City public schools. To kick off summer vacation, let's listen to some music for families! Lucy Kalantari is a Grammy-award winning musician who specializes in children's music. Her new album, Creciendo, is her first full-length project in Spanish, inspired by her Puerto Rican and Dominican identity. Kalantari joins us in studio to perform live, and talk about her process as a songwriter for the new "Dora" series.*This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen
6/26/202428 minutes, 45 seconds
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A Picture Book Celebrating NYC Food Vendor Families

Today we are celebrating the last day of school in New York City public schools! Karina González is a Brooklyn-based picture book author and bilingual speech-language pathologist. She joins us in-studio to discuss her latest book, Churro Stand, which celebrates the food vendors of New York and the working parents who serve their community.*This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen 
6/26/202410 minutes, 30 seconds
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A Children's Book Inspired by Far Rockaway

Today is the last day of school for New York City public schools, so as we head into summer vacation, we're celebrating with stories for kids! Journalist and author Karen Good Marable has written a new picture book, Yaya and the Sea, about a girl named Yaya who takes the A train with her mom and aunties down to coastal New York City, and learns about growing up in the process. Marable tells us more about her inspiration for the book and does a special reading!*This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen
6/26/202410 minutes, 11 seconds
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What's Your Favorite Commencement Speech?

Guest host Kousha Navidar is headed to his alma mater to give a commencement speech to the graduating class of 2024. To prepare Kousha, we're joined by Riley Roberts, a professional speechwriter. The two break down their favorite commencement speeches, and ask listeners about their favorites.
6/25/202420 minutes, 39 seconds
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The History of Reality TV with Emily Nussbaum

In her new book, Cue the Sun!: The Invention of Reality TV, Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Emily Nussbaum makes the case for taking the history of reality television seriously, especially considering the 2016 election of a reality TV star as President. She joins us to discuss this history ahead of her 7 pm event tonight at the Strand.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/25/202429 minutes, 29 seconds
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'Pod Save America' Hosts on How to Be Involved in Politics Without Losing Your Mind

Crooked Media founders and Pod Save America hosts Jon Favreau, Jon Lovett, and Tommy Vietor have written a book, Democracy or Else: How to Save America in 10 Easy Steps, about how to be involved in politics in a way that actually feels productive. They join us to discuss the book, and take your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/25/202432 minutes, 7 seconds
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'A Quiet Place: Day One' with Writer and Director Michael Sarnoski

The new film, "A Quiet Place: Day One,"  is set in New York City and captures the experience of the very first day that the mysterious, sound-seeking creatures landed on earth. We speak with writer and director Michael Sarnoski about the new prequel, which stars Lupita Nyong'o and is in theaters this Friday.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/25/202419 minutes
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Remembering Hockey Star Hobey Baker

Hobey Baker was considered one of the very first American ice hockey stars, taking the sport to new heights in the early 20th century. Tragically, he died under mysterious circumstances while in military service during World War I. A new podcast from ESPN's 30 For 30, Searching for Hobey Baker, investigates his life, death, and identity as a gay man in early 20th century America. Executive producer Andy Reynolds joins us to discuss.*Kousha Navidar Hosts*
6/24/202421 minutes, 45 seconds
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How to Combat Summer FOMO, or Fear of Missing Out

Summer can be a lonely time if you don't feel like you have exciting plans every weekend. Matt Lundquist, founder and clinical director of Tribeca Therapy, joins us to discuss ways to combat summer FOMO (Fear of Missing Out) and take your calls.*Kousha Navidar Hosts*
6/24/202428 minutes, 16 seconds
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Are You Travelling This Summer?

Summer is officially here. See what destinations are trending, where to avoid the crowds, where to go on a budget and more with Lonely Planet's executive editor Nitya Chambers. We also take your calls and questions.*Kousha Navidar Hosts*
6/24/202422 minutes, 39 seconds
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How to Break Up With Your Pest Friend

Summer brings longer days and warmer temperatures. But the season also brings unwanted guests like mice, fruit flies, bed bugs and roaches into your home. To prevent and eradicate these pests, we're joined by Jim Fredericks, entomologist and senior vice president of Public Affairs at the National Pest Management Association. Plus, we take your calls.*Kousha Navidar Hosts*
6/24/202428 minutes, 9 seconds
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Lake Street Dive Perform Live

The band Lake Street Dive join us for a live special performance and to discuss their new album, Good Together, out today!*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar 
6/21/202426 minutes, 9 seconds
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How a New Deal Era Music Unit Inspired a Generation of Folk Musicians

In the 1930s, President Roosevelt's New Deal program revitalized Americans struggling during the Great Depression, including those working in the arts. One program, the U.S. Music Unit, sought to record and collect folk songs from all over America. The program collected over 800 songs over a two-year span before it was shut down for supposed socialistic sympathies. Author Sheryl Kaskowitz has written a new book about the history of the program, A Chance to Harmonize: How FDR's Hidden Music Unit Sought to Save America from the Great Depression―One Song at a Time, and she is with us to discuss her book and listen to archival recordings.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/21/202424 minutes, 53 seconds
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What's the Best NYC Sandwich?

Sandwiches are universal, yet they come in so many shapes and sizes. Where do you get the best one in the city? We speak with THE CITY reporter Katie Honan about her sandwich guide. Plus we take your calls for your favorites.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/21/202423 minutes, 11 seconds
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How to Enjoy the Summer in Westchester

Today we revisit our summer series taking your recommendations about how to have summer and weekend fun in our area. Today we focus on Westchester. Amy Sowder, managing editor of Westchester Magazine, gives us her picks of the places and activities to enjoy the sunshine in Westchester County, and we take your calls!*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
6/21/202426 minutes, 33 seconds
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Medium Build's 'Country'

Medium Build just released his acclaimed album, Country, and is currently in the midst of his North American headline tour. He joins us for a Listening Party ahead of his shows at Bowery Ballroom this weekend on Friday, June 21 and Sunday, June 22. 
6/20/202421 minutes, 36 seconds
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The Forgotten History of The 1970 Women's World Cup

In August of 1971, fifty years after the UK's Football Association banned women's soccer competitions, a group of women's soccer teams gathered in Mexico City for the first unofficial Women's World Cup. The documentary, "COPA 71," tells the story of this monumental - and largely forgotten - sporting event. Directors Rachel Ramsay and James Erskine, as well as Carol Wilson, team captain of the 1971 England team join us to discuss the film, which premieres tomorrow at IFC Center and on digital streaming platforms.
6/20/202428 minutes, 1 second
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How to Host a Dinner Party Your Guests Will Never Forget

Hosting a dinner party this summer? We've got you covered. Katherine Lewin is the founder of Big Night, a dinner party shop (with locations in the West Village and Greenpoint) that is full of inspiring ideas to level-up your hosting. Lewin is also author of the new book, Big Night: Dinners, Parties, and Dinner Parties, and she tells about the secrets to hosting a memorable dinner party and take your calls.
6/20/202427 minutes, 2 seconds
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Tips to Stay Cool

We kick off the first day of summer with some news-you-can-use and crowdsource tips from listeners on how to beat the heat. We're also joined by Annie Colbert, editor in chief of Popular Science, to talk about the science of temperature and extreme heat, and to explain how some of these strategies work.
6/20/202425 minutes, 47 seconds
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Shirley Chisholm at 100

Changing the Face of Democracy: Shirley Chisholm at 100 is a new exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York. It's the first major museum presentation dedicated to the legendary legislator, and it looks at her legacy -- and how she changed our country forever.*This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
6/19/202423 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Story Behind The Black Barbie

A new documentary from Executive Producer Shonda Rhymes spotlights the design team behind the first Black Barbie doll as well as speaks to Black celebrities and tastemakers about the importance of representation in all facets of life. Director Lagueria Davis joins to discuss "Black Barbie."*This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
6/19/202426 minutes, 22 seconds
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Your Favorite Ice Cream Spots

As New York enters a heat wave, we speak with Eater NY editor Melissa McCart about where to scoop up the best ice cream in the city and take calls from listeners to share their favorites.*This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
6/19/202427 minutes, 35 seconds
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How Ice Became A Hot Commodity

[REBROADCAST FROM JUNE 21, 2023] A new book explains how ice became a necessity in our everyday lives, whether its making tall glasses of tea, skating rinks or cutting-edge cryotherapy breast-cancer treatments. Journalist and historian Amy Brady join us to discuss her latest book, titled Ice: From Mixed Drinks to Skating Rinks--a Cool History of a Hot Commodity.
6/19/202424 minutes, 15 seconds
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Lily Gladstone's Love Letter to Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women

A new film premiering on Apple TV+ attempts to humanize the epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women. Golden Globe winner Lily Gladstone plays Jax, a woman trying to solve the mystery of her missing sister while trying to create some degree of stability for her niece, Roki, played by Isabel DeRoy-Olson. Both join to discuss "Fancy Dance."This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/18/202423 minutes, 27 seconds
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Jordan Rakei Performs Live from 'The Loop'

New Zealand-Australian musician and singer Jordan Rakei's latest album, The Loop, features a beautiful symphony of bold orchestral and soulful choral arrangements. He joins us in the studio to perform songs from the album live.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/18/202426 minutes, 36 seconds
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Frederick Joseph’s Poetry Collection, 'We Alive, Beloved'

Bestselling author Frederick Joseph's latest poetry collection explores the complexities of relationships and the heartache of loss. He joins us for a conversation about his new book, We Alive, Beloved on the day of its release.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/18/202418 minutes, 58 seconds
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A History of LGBTQ+ Comedians (Pride on Screen)

"Outstanding: A Comedy Revolution"  is a new documentary that traces the history of LGBTQ+ entertainers in comedy. From legends like Lily Tomlin, Wanda Sykes and Rosie O'Donnell, the film discusses how LGBTQ+ trailblazers made a space for themselves in stand-up, late night, and Hollywood films. Director Page Hurwitz and comedians Suzanne Westenhoefer and Todd Glass discuss the project, which is available on Netflix starting today.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/18/202432 minutes, 44 seconds
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A Black Utopia Turns Dystopic in Nicola Yoon's 'One Of Our Kind'

In Nicola Yoon's  first novel for adults, a woman named Jasmyn and her family move to a wealthy, utopic, all-Black community in Liberty, California. But very quickly, Jasmyn begins to realize that all in Liberty is not as peaceful as it seems. Yoon joins us to discuss her novel, One of Our Kind.This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar 
6/17/202423 minutes, 1 second
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Fame, Sanity and the Limits of the American Dream in 'Invasive Species'

Argentinian actor Maia Novi will stop at nothing to be in the American movies, even if it means losing her mind. It's the premise of the off-Broadway play, "Invasive Species," based on Novi's personal experiences navigating drama school. Novi and director Michael Breslin join us to discuss the dark comedy, which is running at the Vineyard's Dimson Theatre until June 30.
6/17/202426 minutes, 45 seconds
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Exploring the Psychology of 'Inside Out 2'

Disney and Pixar's “Inside Out 2” returns to the mind of teenage Riley Andersen just as headquarters is undergoing a sudden demolition to make room for new emotions such as envy, embarrassment, boredom, and anxiety. Psychologist Dr. Lisa Damour, who consulted on the film, and co-writer Dave Holstein, join us to discuss the science behind teenage emotions displayed on screen. This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar 
6/17/202422 minutes, 42 seconds
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What's the Best Pixar Movie? (Small Stakes, Big Opinions)

Pixar's latest movie, "Inside Out 2," was released in theaters over the weekend. The beloved animation studio has been making films for decades that are beloved by adults and children alike. For the latest installment of our Small Stakes, Big Opinions series, we attempt to answer the question: What is the best Pixar movie? Will Leitch, New York Magazine contributing editor, and film critic Tim Grierson have ranked the Pixar films for Vulture, and they give us their thoughts and take your calls.This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar 
6/17/202428 minutes, 14 seconds
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Tony Nominee: The 'Stereophonic' Creative Team

[REBROADCAST FROM MAY 8, 2024] The new play "Stereophonic" recently became the most Tony Award-nominated play ever, receiving 13 nominations. It follows the story of a band recording a new album as their relationships with one another begin to fracture. We're joined by playwright David Adjmi, director Daniel Aukin, and composer Will Butler to discuss the show, running through August 18 at the Golden Theatre.
6/14/202419 minutes, 32 seconds
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Tony Nominee: Daniel Radcliffe stars in 'Merrily We Roll Along'

[REBROADCAST FROM DEC. 15, 2022] Stephen Sondheim and George Furth's now-beloved musical "Merrily We Roll Along" was a massive flop when it premiered in 1981, lasting on Broadway for only two weeks. But a new production at New York Theater Workshop has opened to rave reviews, signaling the show might have found a new life. Stars Daniel Radcliffe and Lindsay Mendez join us to discuss the production, and why it's working this time.  
6/14/202419 minutes, 17 seconds
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Tony Nominee: 'Cabaret,' with Eddie Redmayne, Gayle Rankin and Rebecca Frecknall

[REBROADCAST FROM MAY 16, 2024] The classic musical "Cabaret" is back on Broadway, this time transforming a theater into an immersive Kit Kat Klub experience. Tony nominated stars Eddie Redmayne (the emcee) and Gayle Rankin (Sally Bowles) join us alongside director Rebecca Frecknall to discuss the production, which has been nominated for Best Musical Revival.
6/14/202414 minutes, 32 seconds
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Tony Nominee: Leslie Odom Jr. in Purlie Victorious

[REBROADCAST FROM OCT. 27, 2023] Ossie Davis's daring farce, "Purlie Victorious: A Non-Confederate Romp Through the Cotton Patch," has been revived on Broadway for the very first time. Tony-winning actor Leslie Odom, Jr. plays Purlie Victorious Judson, a Black man determined to win back the money for his community church from Ol' Cap'n Cotchipee. Tony nominee Kara Young stars as Lutiebelle Gussie Mae Jenkins, a woman who gets caught up in Purlie's scheme. The production is directed by Tony-winner Kenny Leon, who joins us alongside Young and Odom Jr.
6/14/202414 minutes, 4 seconds
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Tony Nominee: 'Hell's Kitchen,' Inspired By Alicia Keys

[REBROADCAST FROM NOV. 16, 2023] In the 1980s and '90s, Alicia Keys was a girl living with her mother in a small apartment off Times Square, with a dream of being a professional musician. Of course, we know how her life turned out. Keys is one of the creators of a new musical inspired by her early life in Manhattan, featuring original music and lyrics. "Hell's Kitchen" tells the story of Ali (Maleah Joi Moon), a 17-year-old who wants to make it big. To discuss the show, we're joined by director Michael Greif, book writer Kristoffer Diaz, and music supervisor Adam Blackstone.
6/14/202416 minutes, 24 seconds
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Tony Nominee: Sarah Paulson stars in 'Appropriate'

[REBROADCAST FROM JAN. 9, 2024] In the Broadway staging of Branden Jacobs-Jenkins' Obie-winning play "Appropriate," Sarah Paulson stars as Toni, a woman dealing with the fallout from a gruesome discovery among her late father's things. Toni and her brothers, who are cleaning out the old family plantation home, must decide what to do with this explosive artifact. Jacobs-Jenkins, Paulson, and director Lila Neugebauer join us to discuss the show.
6/14/202418 minutes, 18 seconds
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Grief is One Sneaky Bitch

Lisa Keefauver is a widow, a grief activist, social worker, and host of the podcast, Grief is a Sneaky Bitch. Now, in her new book of the same title, she helps people navigating grief orient themselves to their new reality and shares tools they can use to move forward, not on.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/13/202429 minutes, 7 seconds
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Alisa Amador Performs Live from 'Multitudes'

Boston-based bilingual singer-songwriter Alisa Amador rose to fame after she won the 2022 Tiny Desk Concert on NPR. Her new album, Multitudes, is a captivating self-portrait that celebrates her Latinx roots and her journey as an artist. Amador joins us in studio before her live performance at The Stone Pony in Asbury Park tomorrow.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/13/202427 minutes, 14 seconds
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A Father Finds Comfort in Community Theater in the New Film 'Ghostlight'

In the new film "Ghostlight," a father finds meaning in joining a community theater production of "Romeo & Juliet," while realizing that the play is beginning to mirror his own life. Writer and director Kelly O'Sullivan, co-director Alex Thompson, and star Keith Kupferer join us to discuss the film, which premieres in theaters on Friday.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/13/202422 minutes, 34 seconds
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A New Thai Comic Book Cookbook (Food for Thought)

To reconnect with her Thai identity, Belgium-based cartoonist Christina De Witte started virtual Thai language classes during the pandemic where she met Mallika Kauppinen, a native Thai speaker, language instructor, and accomplished cook. The pair have banded together to create a new Thai comic book cookbook, Noodles, Rice, and Everything Spice. De Witte and Kauppinen join us to discuss some of the recipes and illustrations in the book.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/13/202423 minutes, 59 seconds
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PJ Morton Performs Live from 'Cape Town to Cairo'

Grammy-award winning musician PJ Morton is back with a new album, Cape Town to Cairo, which was fully produced, written and created during his month-long trip around the African content. With collaborations with local artists and using regional sounds, PJ Morton's album is an ode to his motherland, and the cultures and stories he encountered while there. Morton joins us for a live performance and discusses his experience making the record.This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/12/202426 minutes, 9 seconds
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Wynton Marsalis on Blue Note Residency

This week, Wynton Marsalis is playing his first residency at the famous Blue Note Jazz Club in over thirty years. The Pulitzer Prize-winning trumpeter will be playing with both the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra and the Future of Jazz Septet through June 16. Marsalis discusses with us his residency, his favorite memories of playing at the Blue Note, and his continued education efforts in Jazz.This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/12/202424 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Legacy of Harry Belafonte

"Following Harry,"  a documentary screening at Tribeca this year follows artist and activist Harry Belafonte in his twilight years, helping mentor the next generation of social justice activists. We'll speak with the director, Susanne Rostock, as well as poet Aja Monet and activist Matt Post who are featured in the film. This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/12/202422 minutes, 18 seconds
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The Lesbian Bar Project

Lesbian bars have been safe spaces for the LGBTQ+ community. The documentary series "Lesbian Bar Project" takes us to bars all across the globe - from Texas to Germany - to understand what they mean for the lesbian and queer femme community. Filmmakers Erica Rose and Elina Street join us to discuss the project, as part of our Pride on Screen series.This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/12/202428 minutes, 55 seconds
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Julia Louis-Dreyfus Confronts Death in 'Tuesday'

In "Tuesday," Julia Louis-Dreyfus plays a mother who, along with her dying teenage daughter, must confront Death when it arrives in the form of an astonishing talking bird. Louis-Dreyfus joins us to talk about her role in the new film, along with director Daina O. Pusić.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/11/202422 minutes, 44 seconds
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Commemorating the 80th Anniversary of D-Day with Stories of Veterans

Last week marked the 80th anniversary of D-Day, and as we mark the historic event, we also acknowledge that soon, World War II veterans will no longer be with us. We want to invite listeners to call in and share their relative's story of their D-Day experience, or any veterans who want to share what they went through on that day. Guiding us through the conversation is author Garrett M. Graff, who will discuss his new book, When The Sea Came Alive: An Oral History of D-Day.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/11/202449 minutes, 38 seconds
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Comedian Ian Karmel Opens Up About Life as a Fat Kid in His Memoir

Comedian Ian Karmel and his sister, Dr. Alisa Karmel, grew up overweight as kids. However, they never talked about it. In a new memoir, the two reflect on their childhood experiences. Ian joins us to discuss their book, T-Shirt Swim Club, which is out today.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/11/202428 minutes, 41 seconds
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Heartbreakers Lead Guitarist Mike Campbell on New Album, 'Vagabonds, Virgins & Misfits' (Listening Party)

This Friday, guitarist Mike Campbell and his band The Dirty Knobs will release their new rocking album, Vagabonds, Virgins & Misfits. Campbell was a founder, lead guitarist, and co-writer for Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, and he joins us in studio for a Listening Party preview of the new album.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
6/10/202422 minutes, 11 seconds
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Reflections on Fatherhood

WNYC reporter and All Of It guest host Matt Katz spent years looking for his biological father, a search that turned into his acclaimed podcast, Inconceivable Truth. He joins us to reflect on how that search made him think about parenting and fatherhood ahead of Father's Day.*This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
6/10/202427 minutes, 45 seconds
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An Eye-Opening Account of a Mother Learning to Support Her Teen (Mental Health Monday)

A mother provides raw testimony about her struggle to help her son facing intense mental health challenges, including depression, substance abuse, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts. It's titled,I Can Fix This: And Other Lies I Told Myself While Parenting My Struggling Child. Author Kristina Kuzmič joins us to discuss lessons she learned about supporting her children through crisis, and we take listener calls.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/10/202420 minutes, 58 seconds
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How To Break Up With A Friend

Friendships can ground us, nurture us, and be a great source of fun and belonging. But what happens when they aren't working? We speak to author Anna Goldfarb, whose latest book, Modern Friendship, is about how to nurture friendships and also know when to let go. Plus, we take your calls.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
6/10/202429 minutes, 10 seconds
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What's Your Third Space?

Our lives are lived in three places: home, work – and a third place. Usually it’s not a place that bridges the first two, like a library, bookstore, park, cafe, barbershop, dog park. But they're becoming increasingly rare. Writer Allie Volpe joins to discuss the importance of third spaces and what its decline could mean for everyday people. She's the writer of the latest Vox article, If you want to belong, find a third place.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
6/7/202426 minutes, 47 seconds
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Tig Notaro's New Comedy on Coming Out Later in Life

In her directorial debut, queer comedian TigNotaro explores what it means to come out late(r) in life. The film, "Am I Ok?", features Lucy (played by Dakota Johnson) who reveals a long held secret about her sexuality to her best friend.Notarojoins us to talk about the film, which is available to stream on Max.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
6/7/202424 minutes, 25 seconds
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A History of Puerto Rico

Ahead of the Puerto Rican Day Parade on Sunday, we take some time to look back on the history of the island, and the circumstances that led so many Puerto Ricans to move to New York City. Author Jorell Meléndez-Badillo joins us to discuss his new book, Puerto Rico: A National History.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
6/7/202429 minutes, 35 seconds
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What Are Your Weekend Plans?

What's up this weekend? We ask listeners about their weekend plans. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
6/7/202420 minutes, 19 seconds
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Blue Lights Season 2

The Northern Irish police procedural, "Blue Lights," has been called "Ireland's answer to the Wire" for its both gritty and compassionate depiction of rookie cops working the hard scrabble streets of Belfast. Season 1 was nominated for 4 IFTAs (Irish Film and Television Awards) including Best New Drama. Season 2 premieres on BritBox June 13 and creators Declan Lawn and Adam Patterson join to discuss the series.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
6/6/202423 minutes, 17 seconds
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Your Go-To Meals to Nurse a Hangover in New York

Summer in New York is a season made for late nights. If you drink alcohol, perhaps you'll wake up with more than one hangover this summer, in which case you'll probably be craving some food to aid in nursing the typical morning-after headache. Nikita Richardson, New York Times Food editor who also writes the Where To Eat Newsletter, recently wrote about her go-to meals and places around the city for a hangover cure, and she joins us to discuss what makes the perfect hangover food and take your calls.*This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
6/6/202426 minutes, 50 seconds
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Yasmin Fahr's New Cookbook

Cookbook author and globetrotting food writer Yasmin Fahr joins to discuss her latest book, Cook Simply, Live Fully, which features recipes for easy weeknight dinners and one-pot meals. Plus, she'll take listener calls.This segment is guest hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/6/202422 minutes, 56 seconds
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Why Aren't Concert Tickets Selling?

Following the tour cancellations from artists like Jennifer Lopez and The Black Keys and slow ticket sales for other artists like Future and Metro Boomin',  we investigate what's going on with summer concerts with Dave Brooks, senior director of live music and touring at Billboard. Plus, we discuss the Biden administration's antitrust lawsuit against Live Nation, which owns Ticketmaster. And we take your calls! This segment is guest hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/6/202428 minutes, 30 seconds
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Director Ron Howard's New Film spotlights the work of Jim Henson

Generations have grown up with Kermit the Frog, Oscar the Grouch and Big Bird. Now Academy Award-winning director Ron Howard takes a look at the man behind the muppets, Jim Henson, in his new documentary "Jim Henson: Idea Man". Ron Howard joins to discuss the film and Henson's legacy. This segment is guest hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/6/202427 minutes, 9 seconds
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Alan Braufman's 'Infinite Love Infinite Tears' (Listening Party)

In the 1970s, Brooklyn-born saxophonist Alan Braufman released a cult classic free jazz album, Valley of Search. But for decades afterwards, Braufman was out of the spotlight, not releasing any albums as a band leader. However, in 2018 Valley of Search was rediscovered by a new generation of jazz fans, leading to Braufman recording a new critically acclaimed album, The Fire Still Burns, in 2020. He's just released a new album, Infinite Love Infinite Tears, and Braufman joins us in studio for a Listening Party ahead of his show tomorrow night at National Sawdust.This segment is guest hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/6/202422 minutes, 57 seconds
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What's A Queer Film That Shaped You? (Pride on Screen)

Movies can serve as a vehicle to broaden our understanding of the world, and find empathy and meaning in our lives. This Pride Month, we ask our listeners: What's a queer film that shaped you? Kyle Turner, freelance journalist and author ofThe Queer Film Guide joins to help answer that question. This segment is part of "Pride on Screen," our new series this June where we showcase contemporary LGBTQ+ issues through film.*This segment is guest hosted by Kousha Navidar.
6/5/202429 minutes, 4 seconds
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An Exhibit Devoted to Bling

From Golden Era of the 1980's to present day, jewelry has been a consistent part of hip hop style and fashion. A new exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History pays homage to the unique creativity of the designs, from "dookie chains" to the elaborate, "iced out" pendants worn by current stars like Drake and A$AP Rocky. Curator Vikki Tobak and legendary rapper Roxanne Shante join to discuss Ice Cold and the enduring style of hip hop jewels.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
6/5/202422 minutes, 13 seconds
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'Job' to Open on Broadway

[REBROADCAST FROM October 3, 2023] The play "Job" centers on the relationship between a crisis therapist, played by "Succession" actor Peter Friedman, and his client, a tech employee played by Sydney Lemmon whose recent workplace breakdown has become a viral video. Friedman and Lemmon join us with the playwright Max Wolf Friedlich. "Job" is opening on Broadway on July 15 at the Hayes Theater following two successful off-Broadway runs.
6/4/202427 minutes, 13 seconds
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Hollywood’s Cruel Summer (So Far)

The Cannes Film Festival recently wrapped, and it gave a peek at some films that might be jockeying for Oscar nominations this season. New York Times pop culture reporter Kyle Buchanan was in Cannes and drops by to share his takeaways from the festival, as well as share films he's looking forward to this summer. We also discuss the state of the Summer Blockbuster in light of two big box office disappointments in "The Fall Guy" and "Furiosa."This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/4/202418 minutes, 21 seconds
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Brooklyn-born Singer Zsela Previews Debut Album, 'Big For You"

Brooklyn-born, LA-based singer Zsela's long-awaited debut album, Big For You, comes four years after the release of her EP Ache of Victory which The New York Times called "a group of songs that are emotive yet elusive." She joins us to discuss the inspiration behind music songs and preview her forthcoming album.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/4/202424 minutes, 20 seconds
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A History of The Stone Pony, Where Springsteen Got His Start

The Stone Pony in Asbury Park has an almost mythical reputation in New Jersey music history. The beachside venue was where a young Bruce Springsteen first got his start, and it was a popular destination for local acts and memorable nights beginning in the 1970s. New York Times reporter Nick Corasaniti has written a new book, I Don't Want To Go Home: The Oral History of The Stone Pony, and he recounts to us what he learned about the storied venue. Plus, we take your calls.EVENT: Nick will be hosting a ticketed book release party at The Stony Pony on June 8. Doors open at 7pm.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
6/4/202431 minutes, 43 seconds
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Arooj Aftab's New Album, 'Night Reign' (Listening Party)

Grammy-winning musician and singer Arooj Aftab joins us for a Listening Party for her new album, Night Reign, which combines jazz and folk sounds. Pitchfork says the album's "gestures are bold, romantic, and often unforgettable."*This segment is guest-hosted by David Furst.
6/3/202422 minutes, 9 seconds
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Examining the Roots of Hypochondria (Mental Health Mondays)

In an age of Web MD, most of us have found ourselves anxiously Googling symptoms, and diagnosing ourselves with terrible ailments, even if we know it's a bad idea. A new book gets to the cultural, historical, and mental health roots of hypochondria. It's titled, A Body Made of Glass: A Cultural History of Hypochondria. Author Caroline Crampton joins us to discuss, and take calls, as part of our ongoing series, Mental Health Mondays.*This segment is guest-hosted by David Furst.
6/3/202428 minutes, 35 seconds
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What Does Your 'Coming Out' Journey Look Like?

Happy June! We're kicking off Pride Month by asking listeners about their 'coming out' journeys. We're joined by Mathew Rodriguez, freelance writer for Teen Vogue, Slate, Out and Remezcla, who covers LGBTQ+ topics. He joins us to talk about what 'coming out' has looked like historically in the United States, and how to support LGBTQ+ people with their coming out experience.*This segment is guest-hosted by David Furst.
6/3/202429 minutes, 30 seconds
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A New Season of Slow Burn Tackles the Briggs Initiative

A new season of Slate’s popular narrative-driven podcast, Slow Burn revisits the fight against the Briggs Initiative in California, the nation’s first statewide referendum on gay rights. Writer, producer and host Christina Cauteruccia joins us to discuss.*This segment is guest-hosted by David Furst.
6/3/202421 minutes, 26 seconds
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Audrey Kang of Lightning Bug Performs (Get Lit)

Audrey Kang is the bandleader of Lightning Bug, the New York City indie rock group. Kang joins us on the heels of releasing the band's new album, No Paradise. We present our interview with Kang, and a live performance. The conversation was hosted by All Of It producer Simon Close.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/31/202422 minutes, 6 seconds
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Author Lisa Ko on 'Memory Piece' (Get Lit)

We air highlights from our May Get Lit with All Of It book club event with author Lisa Ko. We discussed her book, Memory Piece, which follows three friends in New York from the 1980s through 2040 as their hopes, dreams, and ambitions change alongside the city. The conversation was hosted by All Of It producer Jordan Lauf.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/31/202427 minutes, 58 seconds
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In 'Ezra,' a Struggling Comedian Bonds with his Autistic Son

In the new film "Ezra,"  Bobby Cannavale plays a standup comedian who is struggling with his ex-wife about the best way to raise their son, Ezra, who has autism. The film is directed by Tony Goldwyn and written by Tony Spiridakis, based on his own experiences with his son. They join us to discuss "Ezra," which premieres in theaters today.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/31/202424 minutes, 27 seconds
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Viggo Mortensen's Western Romance, 'The Dead Don't Hurt'

Viggo Mortensen joins us to discuss writing, directing, and starring in the new Western romance, "The Dead Don't Hurt," about a couple relearning each other after the wife's husband returns from the Civil War. Mortensen is joined by actor Vicky Krieps, who plays Vivienne in the film. "The Dead Don't Hurt" is in theaters today.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/31/202426 minutes, 39 seconds
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Previewing the Public Song Project

Submissions for All of It's Public Song Project are closed. To give a preview of some of the song submissions, and upcoming events, Producer Simon Close joins us in studio.  
5/30/20249 minutes, 46 seconds
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Where to Travel for Good Food This Summer

It’s officially summer travel season. If you’re thinking about planning a trip to sample some local cuisine along the Eastern Seaboard (or beyond) we’ll share some suggestions of where to check out great food with Hunter Lewis, editor in chief of Food and Wine. And we’ll take your calls of your favorite places for your favorite dishes. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/30/202425 minutes, 2 seconds
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William Jackson Harper's Tony-Nominated Performance in 'Uncle Vanya'

William Jackson Harper has received a Tony nomination for his role as Astrov in the classic Chekov play "Uncle Vanya," running now at Lincoln Center. He joins us to discuss.*This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.  
5/30/202423 minutes, 49 seconds
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Previewing NewFest Pride Film Festival

Pride Month is only a few days away, and NewFest is launching its annual NewFest Pride film festival! The 5-day festival features a series of short films, documentaries, and director Q&As that celebrate the community's enduring legacy. Programming director Nick McCarthy and executive director David Hatkoff join us in studio to give us a preview NewFest, which starts tonight.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.  
5/30/202416 minutes, 24 seconds
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How to Chef It Up While Camping

Years ago, chef and cookbook author Lee Kalpakis decided to leave her life in New York City behind and move to a camper in the Catskills. Now, she's released a new cookbook based on her experiences in the woods to help others camp, and cook, in style. She joins us to discuss, Out There: A Camper Cookbook, and take calls from listeners.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.  
5/30/202426 minutes, 9 seconds
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Photoville's Heading to a Borough Near You This Summer

Photoville's yearly exhibition of public photography launches this weekend. We speak to executive director Laura Roumanos about the festival's thirteenth year as well as hear from photographer Ismail Ferdous, whose work will be featured.This segment is guest-hosted by Kate Hinds
5/29/202428 minutes, 9 seconds
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Judy Collins Takes Your Calls and Previews 'Wildflowers' Concert Film

Recently, singer-songwriter Judy Collins recorded a concert in which she performed her iconic 1967 album, Wildflowers, backed by an orchestra. A recording of the concert streams on the PBS app starting tomorrow, and Collins previews the concert for us, reflects on the impact of Wildflowers, and takes your calls!This segment is guest-hosted by Kate Hinds
5/29/202427 minutes, 32 seconds
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NYC Band Habibi Previews Their New Album 'Dreamachine' (Listening Party)

The New York-based indie rock band Habibi combines the sounds of the Arab world with punk rock to create a unique sound. Founding bandmembers Rahill Jamalifard and Lenny Lynch join us to preview their new album, Dreamachine, out Friday. The band is playing tomorrow night at Rough Trade.This segment is guest-hosted by Kate Hinds.
5/29/202421 minutes, 53 seconds
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It's Never Too Late to Start an Herb Garden

Fresh herbs are a great way to elevate your home cooking. Whether it's basil, thyme, rosemary, or sage, herbs can be used not just in meals, but in drinks too! And they're easier to grow than normal houseplants (think fire escape herb gardens). Stephen Orr, editor in chief of Better Homes & Gardens, and author of the book, The New American Herbal: An Herb Gardening Book, returns to the show to give us some tips for starting an herb garden this summer and takes your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Kate Hinds
5/29/202423 minutes, 56 seconds
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What's So Great About New Haven Pizza?

Last week, lawmakers in Connecticut made a push for Connecticut to be named "The Pizza State" and New Haven "The Pizza Capital." Of course, this caused some consternation here in New York, where we think highly of our own offerings. For our latest installment of "Small Stakes, Big Opinions" we ask you to call in and share your favorite pizza joints as well as take a stand about whether New Haven edges out NYC. Joining us as a guest is New Yorker staff writer Hannah Goldfield, who penned a piece called "The Lasting Pleasures of New Haven Pizza."
5/28/202427 minutes, 56 seconds
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Rachel Khong's 'Real Americans'

In the latest novel from writer Rachel Khong, a teenage boy sets out to find his biological father, and we learn the love story between his mother, Lily, and a rich heir to a pharmaceutical company, Matt. Khong joins us to discuss the novel, titled Real Americans.
5/28/202422 minutes, 7 seconds
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Strategies for a Painless Move in New York

Tuesday after Memorial Day is known within the moving industry as "Crazy Tuesday," when moving companies have a high number of requests from clients moving homes around the country. Moving in New York can be especially chaotic and stressful, so Caroline Utz, Senior Editorial Director for The Spruce, gives us some tips to make that move to a new apartment a little less hectic, and we take your calls.
5/28/202424 minutes, 14 seconds
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Have You Moved to New York Recently?

May is National Moving Month, so today we're dedicating a whole hour of the show to moving. Chances are some of you have moved to New York recently. Jake Dobkin, Gothamist co-founder, current Vice President of Sponsorship at New York Public Radio, and author the book, Ask a Native New Yorker: Hard-Earned Advice on Surviving and Thriving in the Big City, takes your calls to see how things are going and offers tips on adjusting to New York life.
5/28/202426 minutes, 8 seconds
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Michael McDonald on 'What a Fool Believes' Memoir

Way before Michael McDonald was Rock & Roll Hall of Famer and Grammy Award–winning musician with The Doobie Brothers, Steely Dan, and as a solo artist, he was a high school dropout from Ferguson, Missouri who moved to California to pursue his dream. Now, McDonald has written a new memoir,What a Fool Believes, and he speaks to us about the book, his life, his music, and his struggles with addiction.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/24/202437 minutes, 9 seconds
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How Are Your Tomatoes Looking?

We know that late summer is the prime season for having more tomatoes than we know what to do with from the garden. But now is a crucial time for planting and early growth. Joel Flagler, Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Bergen County, gives us tips on how to ensure our tomato plants thrive as the weather gets warmer and answers your questions.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/24/202425 minutes, 46 seconds
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Weekend Plans

Last week, we asked you about your weekend plans, and we got some fantastic responses. So we're doing it again! So we're doing it again! Hear what's in store for this weekend from members of team All Of It, our WNYC colleagues, and other listeners.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/24/202414 minutes, 19 seconds
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Ani DiFranco on Her New Album, Documentary, and Starring in 'Hadestown'

Ani DiFranco has a very busy month. She's currently starring as Persephone in "Hadestown." Her new album, Unprecedented Sh!t, drops today, and later in June a new documentary about her life, "1-800-ON-HER-OWN," will premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival. DiFranco joins us to discuss all of her new projects.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/24/202424 minutes, 43 seconds
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A New Cookbook About Salvadoran Culture and Cuisine

Trained chef and food writer Karla Tatiana Vasquez's new cookbook features recipes and traditions within the Salvadoran diaspora. It's titled, The SalviSoul Cookbook: Salvadoran Recipes and The Women Who Preserve Them. Vasquez joins us to share some of those dishes and their history before her event at the Museum of Food and Drink (MOFAD) on Friday, May 24 at 7:00 p.m.
5/23/202417 minutes, 1 second
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When Birding Was Cutthroat

Scientific discovery is often a collaborative experience. But for a group of men in the early 1800s studying birds of North America, it was a messy and chaotic effort to identify and write about many different species as possible, all while trying to outdo each other. Naturalist Kenn Kaufman writes about what John James Audubon and his peers discovered (and what they missed) and how it impacts our understanding of the world today. His book is called, The Birds That Audubon Missed, and Kaufman joins us to discuss.This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
5/23/202418 minutes, 47 seconds
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'Evil' Star Katja Herbers on the Show's Final Season

The New York City-set drama "Evil" follows a scientist, a priest, and a psychiatrist tasked by the Catholic Church with investigating potentially demonic activity around the city. Katja Herbers, who stars as doubtful psychiatrist Kristen Bouchard, joins us to discuss the final season of the show, which premieres today on Paramount +.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
5/23/202415 minutes, 58 seconds
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A Summer Music Preview

It's almost time for a summer of new music: bangers, sweaty bops, anthems, and the annual "song of the summer" debate. With new releases approaching from Charli XCX, Khelani, Tems, and more, All Of It producers Simon Close and L. Malik Anderson break down what music to be looking out for to feed your summer playlist. This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
5/23/202420 minutes, 9 seconds
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Chef Edy Massih on How to 'Keep It Zesty' in the Kitchen

Edy Massih is a trained chef and owner of Edy's Grocer, a Lebanese market and caterer in Greenpoint. Massih moved from his native Lebanon to the U.S at the age of 10, and has just released a new cookbook, Keep It Zesty: A Celebration of Lebanese Flavors & Culture from Edy's Grocer, inspired by the menu of his market and his love for the flavors of Lebanon. Massih tells us more about his story and the book. 
5/22/202414 minutes, 37 seconds
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'Girls5eva' Creator Meredith Scardino

The hit comedy "Girls5eva" tells the story of a girl group that reunites in middle age to make another run at a career in music. The show's creator, Meredith Scardino, joins us to discuss Season 3 of the show, now on Netflix. 
5/22/202420 minutes, 43 seconds
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Claire Messud's New Family Drama 'This Strange Eventful History'

Acclaimed author Claire Messud joins us to discuss her latest novel,This Strange Eventful History, a family drama in part based on her own family's history following Algerian independence. Critics are calling it some of her best work. Messud is speaking tonight with Jennifer Egan at the Center for Fiction.
5/22/202413 minutes, 46 seconds
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Should I Quit Therapy?

A new article that asks whether therapy is more useful as an indefinite practice, or as a shorter-term maintenance practice. Melissa Dahl is a healthcare reporter at The Cut, and her recent article is called Maybe You Shouldn’t Talk to Someone. For years, we were told therapy was the key to a good life. What if we don’t want to go anymore?  Listeners share their own experiences with saying goodbye to long-term therapy.
5/22/202421 minutes, 33 seconds
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Artist Adrienne Elise Tarver Explores Her Identity in New Chelsea Gallery Show

Adrienne Elise Tarver is a Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist who's currently showing new work at Dinner Gallery in Chelsea. In the show, called Where the Waters Go, Tarver examines her own identity as a black woman through painting, using a character she invented named Vera Otis as inspiration, as well as old Ebony magazines. Tarver discusses her work, which is on view now through June 29.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
5/21/202414 minutes, 17 seconds
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A Poetry Album Spotlights the Black Experience in America

Last year, Time Magazine named writer Mahogany L. Browne’s poetry collection, Chrome Valley, one of "100 Must-Read Books" of 2023. Now, she's teamed up with producer and composer Sean Mason to create a music essay on the Black experience in America inspired by the collection. Browne and Mason join us to discuss their collaboration for a Listening Party.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
5/21/202421 minutes, 3 seconds
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Tony Nominees Jessica Lange, Celia Keenan-Bolger, and Jim Parsons on 'Mother Play'

The new Tony-nominated play from Paula Vogel stars Jessica Lange as an unstable mother who struggles in her relationships with her two children, played by Jim Parsons and Celia Keenan-Bolger. All three are Tony nominated for their roles in "Mother Play," which is running now at the Hayes Theater through June 16. Lange, Parsons, and Keenan-Bolger join us to discuss.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
5/21/202417 minutes, 59 seconds
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Erik Larson's 'The Demon of Unrest'

Author Erik Larson joins us to discuss his latest work of history, The Demon of Unrest: A Saga of Hubris, Heartbreak, and Heroism at the Dawn of the Civil War. The book tells the story of turbulent months between the election of Abraham Lincoln and the outbreak of violence.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
5/21/202418 minutes, 2 seconds
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Understanding The Origins of Our Tears

An illustrated study of crying provides insights into why humans shed emotional tears and the role they've played throughout our existence. Visual artist and author Pepita Sandwich joins us to discuss her new book, titled The Art of Crying: The Healing Power of Tears.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/20/202421 minutes, 54 seconds
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'Toshi Reagon: The Parable Path' at The Greene Space

A new musical performance from the Greene Space artist-in-residence, singer-songwriter Toshi Reagon adapts Octavia Butler’s 1993 novel, titled Parable of the Sower which is considered the "grand dame" of science fiction and takes place in the year 2024. We’ll preview tomorrow’s show, and find out what Toshi thinks people mean when they say “Octavia Butler Knew.”*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/20/202417 minutes, 22 seconds
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The Bear Is One of the Hit Series Returning to TV This Summer

Vulture TV critic Kathryn Van Arendonk joins to preview the slate of summer premieres, including the return of hit series like “The Bear,” “Babylon Berlin” and “Evil.”*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/20/202418 minutes, 44 seconds
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A Multi-Part Documentary Highlighting the Trailblazing Stax Record Label

A new, two-night documentary premiere tells the story of the Memphis-based record label Stax, which produced the sound of Otis Redding, Isaac Hayes, Booker T & the MGs and more. Not only was Stax trailblazing in terms of sound, but in its progressive approach to racial equality and inclusion. Director Jamila Wignot joins to discuss "Stax: Soulsville U.S.A."*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/20/202413 minutes, 23 seconds
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Tell Us Your Weekend Plans!

Last week, we asked you about your weekend plans, and we got some fantastic responses. So we're doing it again! Hear what's in store for this weekend from members of team All Of It, our WNYC colleagues, and other listeners.
5/17/202417 minutes, 11 seconds
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An Immersive Textile Installation in Socrates Sculpture Park

Suchitra Mattai's first solo show in New York City features a series of enormous, soft sculptures made from vintage saris. The exhibition pays homage to the artist’s Indo-Caribbean ancestors and the stories of many Queens residents. Mattai joins us alongside curator Kaitlin Garcia-Maestas to discuss the show, titled We are nomads, we are dreamers, which is on display through Sunday, Aug. 25.
5/17/202419 minutes, 37 seconds
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A New Documentary on the Power of Law Enforcement in America

Oscar-nominated director Yance Ford takes on the difficult subject of law enforcement in his new film "Power," questioning whether the police really should have such a sense of control. It begins streaming today on Netflix. We speak to Ford about the project as well as his personal connection to the criminal justice system.
5/17/202421 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Brooklyn Museum Hires a Composer-in-Residence

For the first time ever, the Brooklyn Museum has hired a composer-in-residence to make original music to accompany their exhibitions. Cellist and composer Niles Luther joins us to discuss taking on this new position, and composing original music for the exhibit Hiroshige’s 100 Famous Views of Edo (feat. Takashi Murakami). He is joined by the exhibit's curator, Joan Cummins. 
5/17/202414 minutes, 10 seconds
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How to Give the Gift of Food

Food is a necessity, but when it’s made by someone who loves you, it can be a real gift. So if you love making and receiving gifts of food, or if food is your love language, you may want to whip something together to tell someone you are thinking about them. For this week’s installment of our “Food for Thought” series, we are joined by Elle Simone Scott. She’s a food stylist and a test cook on the PBS show, America’s Test Kitchen, and her new cookbook is called, Food Gifts: 150+ Irresistible Recipes for Crafting Personalized Presents.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
5/16/202412 minutes, 20 seconds
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Nick Offerman and Helen Rebanks Reflect on Farm Life in Pastoral England

Helen Rebanks' new memoir, The Farmer's Wife, discusses modern day life on her farm in pastoral England. She shares the life with her husband, four children and animals. Her sustainable lifestyle has inspired many, including actor and comedian Nick Offerman, who has worked as a farmhand for her. Both join to discuss their experience.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
5/16/202418 minutes, 48 seconds
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Colm Tóibín Continues 'Brooklyn' Saga with 'Long Island'

Celebrated author Colm Tóibín picks up the story of Eilis Lacey years after we last left her in Brooklyn. In the new novel, Long Island, Eilis's life with her husband Tony is disrupted when a man claims that Tony is having an affair with his wife, and that the woman is having his child. Tóibín joins us to discuss the novel ahead of his event tonight at the New York Public Library.
5/16/202417 minutes, 47 seconds
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Eddie Redmayne, Gayle Rankin, and Rebecca Frecknall on Bringing 'Cabaret' Back to Broadway

The classic musical "Cabaret" is back on Broadway, this time transforming a theater into an immersive Kit Kat Klub experience. Tony nominated stars Eddie Redmayne (the emcee) and Gayle Rankin (Sally Bowles) join us alongside director Rebecca Frecknall to discuss the production, which has been nominated for Best Musical Revival.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/16/202423 minutes, 19 seconds
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How Artist Bony Ramirez Spent a Year Immersed in The Newark Museum of Art

When he was a child, artist Bony Ramirez moved from his native Dominican Republic to New Jersey. The first museum he ever visited in his new home was The Newark Museum of Art. After working for years in construction while also painting in his mother's kitchen, Ramirez is now a full-time self-taught artist. Over the last year, Ramirez immersed himself within the museum's collections, and the result is a new installation, Cattleya, featuring work he made inspired by what he found. Bony Ramirez speaks about his experience alongside Elena Munoz-Rodriguez, Newark Museum assistant curator of Latinx and Latin American Art.
5/15/202417 minutes, 44 seconds
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A Story Told Through the Perspective of Two Imaginative Kids

Set in the early 1990s, a new film follows two imaginative 10-year-old boys, Malik and Eric, who live in the Cabrini-Green housing complex. It's titled, "We Grown Now." Director Minhal Baig joins us to discuss the film alongside actress and executive producer Jurnee Smollett who stars as Malik's mother, Dolores.
5/15/202418 minutes, 53 seconds
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Kara Jackson on 'Why Does the Earth Give Us People to Love?' (Listening Party)

Kara Jackson is a former National Youth Poet Laureate who last year released her debut album, Why Does the Earth Give Us People to Love?, to critical acclaim. Jackson combines acoustic folk-style guitars with unsurprisingly poetic lyrics. Ahead of her shows at Public Records in Brooklyn tonight and tomorrow, Kara Jackson joins for a Listening Party.
5/15/202416 minutes, 49 seconds
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A New Banksy Museum Opens in Lower Manhattan

A new exhibition opens today features an exhaustive collection of work from the prolific—yet mysterious street artist, Banksy. We speak to the director of “The Banksy Museum,” William Meade.
5/15/202418 minutes, 19 seconds
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John Green and Director Hannah Marks Adapt 'Turtles All the Way Down'

Bestselling author John Green's novel about a teenager struggling with OCD, Turtles All the Way Down, has now been adapted into a Max original film. Green and director Hannah Marks join us to discuss bringing Green's novel to life. You can stream "Turtles All the Way Down" now on Max.This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/14/202424 minutes, 20 seconds
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'Dark Matter' Series Adapted from Blake Crouch Novel

A new TV series is based on author Blake Crouch's bestselling novel, Dark Matter. It stars Joel Edgerton as a scientist who is abducted and dropped into another version of his life. Crouch is the series' showrunner and Matt Tolmach serves as EP. They both join to discuss.This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/14/202424 minutes, 28 seconds
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A Brash New Comedy About Friendship and Motherhood

The new comedy, "Babes,"  stars Ilana Glazer (who also co-wrote the movie) and Michelle Buteau as childhood best friends. When Glazer's character becomes pregnant from a one-night stand and decides to keep it, she seeks solace--and guidance--from her best friend, a mother of two. It's the feature length directorial debut of actor/writer Pamela Adlon and all three join to discuss.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/14/202426 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Murky Future of TikTok

Last month President Biden signed a bill into law that would ban the popular Chinese app TikTok from the United States unless it is sold, citing national security concerns. What implications could the move have for creators, and for free speech? Sapna Maheshwari, New York Times reporter covering TikTok and technology, joins us to discuss and take calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/14/202425 minutes, 43 seconds
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Poems From Your Neighborhoods

Over the course of April, which is Poetry Month, WNYC producers have been asking our audience to submit their own poems about the places that are important to them, and what’s happening there. We talk about the project, and hear some poems read by the poets themselves along with Amanda Rozon, assistant producer at WNYC's Morning Edition who spearheaded WNYC's listener poetry project.
5/13/202422 minutes, 34 seconds
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Is There Really A Difference Between 'Good' and 'Instant' Coffee?

Some people swear by gourmet coffees and boutique roasts. Others say all coffee is good, as long as it perks you up. Novelist and non-fiction writer Peter C. Baker, whose recent piece in the New York Times Magazine is called "The Case Against ‘Good’ Coffee: Instant coffee tastes … just OK. And that’s fine by me," takes calls from listeners on both sides of the discussion in today's Small Stakes, Big Opinions conversation.
5/13/202421 minutes, 47 seconds
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How Psychedelics Could Change Mental Health Treatment (Mental Health Mondays)

When New York Times correspondent Ernesto Londoño was struggling with depression, he found relief from a surprising source: ayahuasca. Psychedelics are on the rise as a way to treat mental health conditions, but like any drug, they come with side effects and potential problems. We discuss Ernesto’s new book, Trippy: The Peril and Promise of Medicinal Psychedelics, and take calls about your experience with psychedelics.
5/13/202427 minutes, 50 seconds
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'The Wiz' Revival Eases on Down to WNYC

Right now, "The Wiz" is undergoing a revival on Broadway. The show, a musical spinoff of "The Wizard of Oz," first opened in 1975, but the story really became a beloved staple in homes around the country when Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, and Richard Pryor starred in the 1978 movie adaptation. With an updated book from comedian Amber Ruffin, "The Wiz" is running at Marquis Theatre, and star Kyle Ramar Freeman (Lion) and director Schele Williams ease on down to WNYC to discuss their revival.
5/13/202427 minutes, 54 seconds
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'The Fall Guy' Stunt Designer Chris O'Hara

The new Ryan Gosling and Emily Blunt rom-com "The Fall Guy" is all about a stuntman. We speak with Chris O'Hara, the stunt designer for the film, about his work on the project and his career as a stuntman and stunt designer. 
5/10/202430 minutes, 6 seconds
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MoMA Surveys Artist-Activist LaToya Ruby Frazier

Opening this weekend at the Museum of Modern Art is the first wholistic survey of artist and activist LaToya Ruby Frazier, who was just named as one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People of 2024. Frazier was born in the industrial down of Braddock, Pennsylvania, and travels to working class communities around the country using her art as a form of social documentary, from Flint, to Pittsburgh, to Baltimore. LaToya Ruby Frazier: Monuments of Solidarity is on view at MoMA from May 12 to September 7, and Frazier joins us to preview her exhibition.
5/10/202420 minutes, 53 seconds
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Mother's Day Weekend Plans

It's Mother's Day Weekend! We talk about some of the things happening around the city such as the African Film Festival, the Tony-nominated musical Stereophonic, and the Kelly Reichardt career retrospective at the Metrograph. Listeners also share their recommendations for activities and events to participate in over the weekend.
5/10/202430 minutes, 13 seconds
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Last Chance to Submit to the 2024 Public Song Project!

The final day to send a song into the Public Song Project is this Sunday, May 12! Producers Simon Close and Zach Gottehrer-Cohen explain how to submit, talk about how to think about adapting old works, and why this particular branch of intellectual property law is actually super exciting.
5/10/202420 minutes, 14 seconds
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New York's Underground Art Museum

Over the past four decades, hundreds of permanent artworks have been installed across New York City's transit system. The new book, Contemporary Art Underground: New York MTA Arts & Design, highlights more than a hundred recent installations that span the five boroughs. Co-authors Sandra Bloodworth and Cheryl Hageman join us to discuss the art work, the process of how artists get chosen, and how having art in the subway connects riders to the city around them.
5/9/202422 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Creative Team Behind the Tony Nominated Musical 'Illinoise'

[REBROADCAST FROM MARCH 19TH, 2024] "Illinoise"  is a new dance adaptation of the seminal Sufjan Stevens album, with a story by Tony-winning choreographer Justin Peck and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Jackie Sibblies Drury. Drury and Peck, who also directed and choreographed the production, join us.
5/9/202428 minutes, 39 seconds
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Director Kelly Reichardt on Her 30 Year Career Film Retrospective

Filmmaker Kelly Reichardt has spent 30 years making films about everyday people set in the Pacific Northwest. A new retrospective at the Metrograph celebrates all eight of her films in the series American Landscapes: The Cinema of Kelly Reichardt. She joins us to discuss the retrospective and her career thus far. 
5/9/202426 minutes, 49 seconds
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'Sweet Treats:' A New Cookbook from Mel Asseraf

Mel Asseraf knew at an early age that baking was her passion. A graduate of culinary school, she's also a trained pastry chef who studied under established chefs in Paris and has been a winner of the show "Chopped" twice. Her first cookbook contains 100 recipes made with just 10 ingredients. It's called Sweet Treats: from Brownies to Brioche and she'll join to discuss.   
5/9/202422 minutes, 41 seconds
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A Breakdown of the Drake and Kendrick Lamar Beef

In the last few weeks, hip-hop fans have been following Drake and Kendrick Lamar in a beef for the ages. Vulture critic Craig Jenkins helps us understand where the feud between the two began and share some of the highlights from the diss tracks.
5/8/202429 minutes, 29 seconds
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Pulitzer-Winning Play, ‘Primary Trust’

The 2023 Pulitzer-winning play from Eboni Booth tells the story of a bookstore worker named Kenneth who is forced to face everything he's been avoiding when he is laid off from his job.  William Jackson Harper, who stars in "Primary Trust" as Kenneth, discusses the play, alongside Booth.
5/8/202420 minutes, 15 seconds
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Wedding Music: Everybody On The Dance Floor

When couples plan a celebration, one of the key decisions they have to make is about what songs to play to get people to dance. DJ Karin Fjellman has guided couples from the first dance to the final song of the evening. She discusses what works, and what songs you might want to avoid.
5/8/202418 minutes, 32 seconds
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'Stereophonic' Brings a Fictional Band to Life Onstage

The new play "Stereophonic" recently became the most Tony Award-nominated play ever, receiving 13 nominations. It follows the story of a band recording a new album as their relationships with one another begin to fracture. We're joined by playwright David Adjmi, director Daniel Aukin, and composer Will Butler to discuss the show, running through August 18 at the Golden Theatre.
5/8/202432 minutes, 59 seconds
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A Preview of the 2024 New York African Film Festival

The theme for the 31st edition of the New York African Film Festival (NYAFF) is “Convergence of Time." This year's slate includes 50+ films from more than 25 countries, including titles such as "Over the Bridge," "Fight Like a Girl," and "The Rhythm and The Blues." NYAFF founder Mahen Bonetti previews the festival which opens May 8 and closes May 14, alongside journalist, producer, art promoter and filmmaker Oyiza Adaba, whose film "DELA: The Making of El Anatsui" will screen at this year’s festival.This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen. 
5/7/202422 minutes, 9 seconds
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Recapping the 2024 Met Gala

Celebrities hit the red carpet for the 2024 Met Gala last night, one of the biggest events in fashion every year. Vanessa Friedman, New York Times Fashion director and critic, discusses the looks that won the night, the reputation of the Met Gala in the fashion world, and we take your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen.
5/7/202413 minutes, 30 seconds
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'Grenfell,' A Play on the London Tower Fire

The play, "Grenfell: in the words of survivors,"  tells the story of an infamous fire at a public housing project in London, leaving dozens injured and killing seventy people. Playwright Gillian Slovo and cast members Mona Goodwin and Dominique Tipper join us to discuss the play, which is playing at St. Ann's Warehouse until May 12.This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen. 
5/7/202426 minutes, 41 seconds
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'The Ministry of Time' Presents a Time-Traveling Adventure and Romance

In the new novel The Ministry of Time, a new British program has invented a way to bring people from other time periods into 21st century London. A civil servant is tasked with looking after a commander from the infamous Sir John Franklin expedition, and sparks begin to fly. But what is the real goal of the program? Author Kaliane Bradley joins us to discuss the novel, her debut.This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen. 
5/7/202415 minutes, 1 second
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'The 50' Finds Meaning While Incarcerated

The new documentary "The 50" follows a group of incarcerated men training to become some of the first incarcerated substance abuse counselors in the country. Director Brenton Gieser joins us to discuss the film, alongside subject Cameron Clark, a formerly incarcerated person who is now the executive director of DOVE.This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen
5/7/202423 minutes, 18 seconds
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How To Talk About Asian American Mental Health (Mental Health Mondays)

Soo Jin Lee and Linda Yoon, co-directors of the Asian American psychotherapist group called the Yellow Chair Collective, recently wrote a new book, Where I Belong. In this installation of Mental Health Mondays, we talk to Lee and Yoon about this new guidebook, and how it serves to help Asian and Asian-American communities tackle mental health challenges and how to heal from cycles of generational trauma. Plus, we take calls from our listeners.*This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen
5/6/202429 minutes, 14 seconds
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Ethan Hawke's New Film 'Wildcat'

The new film "Wildcat" focuses on the life and work of a young Flannery O'Connor, who heads home to visit her mother amidst a struggle to get her first novel published. We're joined by co-writer and director Ethan Hawke, who directed his own daughter Maya, in the film. The film also co-stars Laura Linney. *This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen
5/6/202420 minutes, 44 seconds
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The Keys to Planning a Successful Intergenerational Family Vacation

It's one thing to travel with friends or a significant other, it's another to a plan a trip that you, mom, dad, grandma, grandpa, the kids, or that one uncle will also enjoy. Paul Brady, Travel + Leisure news editor, gives us some tips on how to plan an intergenerational vacation, and take your calls.*This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen
5/6/202426 minutes, 34 seconds
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Billie Marten for the Public Song Project

The final day to send a song into the Public Song Project is May 12! Billie Marten stops by to share her version of the Bessie Smith hit, "Baby Won't You Please Come Home" for the project. You can stream the song and others from Rhiannon Giddens, They Might Be Giants, and more on the Public Song Project website and also find out how to get involved yourself. Then AOI producer Simon Close marks the final week of submissions by revisiting some songs that stood out from the 2023 edition of the Public Song Project.*This segment is guest hosted by Tiffany Hanssen
5/6/202424 minutes, 20 seconds
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Lakota Musician Frank Waln Performs (Get Lit)

Lakota multi-genre musician and public speaker Frank Waln joined us for a special performance at our April Get Lit with All Of It book club event with author Stephen Graham Jones. Jones has cited Waln's song, "AbOriginal" as an inspiration for his Indian Lake Trilogy. We present our interview with Waln, and a live performance. The conversation was hosted by All Of It producer Simon Close.
5/3/202421 minutes, 35 seconds
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Author Stephen Graham Jones on 'My Heart is a Chainsaw' (Get Lit)

We air highlights from our April Get Lit with All Of It book club event with author Stephen Graham Jones. We discussed his book, My Heart is a Chainsaw, which tells the story of a half-Indigenous woman named Jade who feels alienated from the other people in her small town. She only finds comfort in horror movies. But when real-life murders start happening in her town, she uses her horror acumen to try and get to the bottom of what's going on. The conversation was hosted by All Of It producer Jordan Lauf.
5/3/202428 minutes, 3 seconds
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Village Voice Photographer James Hamilton

The new documentary “Uncropped' tells the story of photographer James Hamilton. He's a famed photographer who captured photos The Village Voice and The New York Observer. Hamilton and director D.W. Young will discuss the film. Plus we take your calls! The film is out now, and available to stream on Apple TV starting May 7.   
5/3/202422 minutes, 9 seconds
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A New Take on the Nativity Story

The opera "El Niño" is making its Met premiere with a powerhouse team behind it, including composer John Adams and conductor Marin Alsop. It also marks the Met debut of acclaimed director Lileana Blain-Cruz, who is currently resident director at Lincoln Center Theater. She joins us to discuss the production along with  bass-baritone Davóne Tines.
5/3/202429 minutes, 37 seconds
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Who's Afraid of Carbs?

In her new cookbook, chef and wellness educator Phoebe Lapine encourages readers to "stop fearing carbs and embrace the comfort foods you love." She joins to discuss Carbivore: 130 Healthy Recipes to Stop Fearing Carbs and Embrace the Comfort Foods You Love and take your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Kate Hinds.
5/2/202426 minutes, 26 seconds
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Judith Hill: 'Letters from a Black Widow' (Listening Party)

Judith Hill was once Prince's protégée and Michael Jackson's duet partner, and she was also featured in the celebrated documentary, "20 Feet From Stardom."  In the decade since, she's performed as a solo artist, and she served as her own producer on her latest album, Letters from a Black Widow. Hill joins us for a Listening Party.This segment is guest-hosted by Kate Hinds.
5/2/202428 minutes, 37 seconds
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I'm Walkin' Here: An Essential Guide to NYC Sidewalk Behavior

With a population of over 8 million, there are a diversity of viewpoints in New York City. But not when it comes to sidewalk behavior. WNYC's James Ramsay polled New Yorkers about sidewalk etiquette and got some very clear opinions. He wrote about it for Gothamist, and now he joins us to discuss and take your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Kate Hinds.
5/2/202420 minutes, 51 seconds
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Bonus Track: Staten Island's Susan E. Wagner High School Jazz Band Performs

Yesterday on the show we were lucky to be joined by 26 students from Staten Island’s Susan E. Wagner High School jazz band. The students will soon be taking part in Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band Competition & Festival, happening May 9-11. They are the only New York City band out of 15 schools around the country selected to participate. After we wrapped our on-air conversation, the band also recorded two bonus songs, "Almendra" and "Who Me?" You can hear those performances now!This segment is guest-hosted by Kate Hinds.
5/2/20248 minutes, 44 seconds
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Raye Zaragoza for the Public Song Project

The final day to send a song into the Public Song Project is May 12. Raye Zaragoza stops by to share her version of George and Ira Gershwin's "Oh, Lady Be Good!" for the project. You can stream the song and others from Rhiannon Giddens, They Might Be Giants, Billie Marten, and more on the Public Song Project website and also find out how to get involved yourself.This segment is guest-hosted by Kate Hinds.
5/2/202416 minutes, 1 second
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A Preview of the Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band Competition & Festival

Jazz at Lincoln Center's 29th annual Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band Competition & Festival is May 9–11! We receive a preview of the event from JLCO’s longtime sax player, Sherman Irby, Todd Stoll, jazz trumpeter and Vice President of Education at Jazz at Lincoln Center, Paul Corn, the band director at Staten Island’s Susan E. Wagner High School and some of his students for a live performance.*This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen.
5/1/202427 minutes, 51 seconds
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'I Saw the TV Glow' is a Horror Meets Sci-Fi Thriller

"I Saw the TV Glow" is a new horror meets sci-fi thriller about a teen who gets drawn into a mysterious TV show and loses his grip on reality. We speak with star Justice Smith and director Jane Schoenbrun about the film, which The Guardian calls "stunning" and "devastating.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
5/1/202423 minutes, 59 seconds
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The History of the 'Swans of Harlem' Told in New Book

A new book tells the little-known story of the first principal ballerinas in the Dance Theatre of Harlem. It spotlights five dancers who broke barriers, performing internationally in a world where Black ballerinas were not expected or, in some cases, welcome. We speak to The Swans of Harlem author Karen Valby and one of the subjects, dancer Marcia Sells.*This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen. 
5/1/202428 minutes, 17 seconds
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How to Level Up Your Finances

A financial guide offers readers tips for protecting themselves from financial abuse, setting boundaries, and investing in the future. Writer and business coach JanneseTorres joins us to discuss her new book, Financially Lit!: The Modern Latina’s Guide to Level Up Your Dinero & Become Financially Poderosa. We also take your calls.*This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen. 
5/1/202422 minutes, 22 seconds
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Dating After 50

Dating can be stressful under the best circumstances; if you're over 50 years old, it can be particularly daunting. But there's a lot of reason for optimism. Maggie Jones is a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine, and she spoke to dozens of people about their experiences for an article called, "Online Dating After 50 Can Be Miserable. But It’s Also Liberating." She joins us to discuss her reporting and take your calls.*This segment is guest hosted by Tiffany Hanssen. 
4/30/202431 minutes, 3 seconds
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Your Personal Heirlooms

Shana Novak is a photographer who is interested in people's heirlooms. To Novak, an heirloom is any object of significance to a person, that thing you just can't seem to get rid of for some reason. Novak launched a project and popular Instagram called The Heirloomist, where she photographs your heirlooms, and today she's releasing a collection of the photographs, The Heirloomist: 100 Treasures and the Stories They Tell. Novak joins to discuss the book and take your calls.*This segment is guested hosted by Tiffany Hanssen. 
4/30/202424 minutes, 36 seconds
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Recapping the Tony Award Nominations

Today, the Tony nominations were announced. Jackson McHenry, theater critic from Vulture joins us to talk about the nominations, recapping this year's theater season, and his predictions for the winners!*This segment is guest hosted by Tiffany Hanssen.  
4/30/202419 minutes, 1 second
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A New Surrealist Drama About Black People in the Workplace

A new dramatic play explores the dynamics Black employees face in white-dominant workplaces through the lens of a creative studio assistant named Jordan (played by Naomi Lorrain) and her new colleague, the "director of culture" who is also named Jordan (played by Toby Onwumere). Playwright Ife Olujobi, director Whitney White and actress Kate Walsh who plays the creative studio's owner, Hailey joins us to discuss the show, which is running at The Public Theater through Sunday, May 12.*This segment is guest hosted by Tiffany Hanssen.  
4/30/202426 minutes, 30 seconds
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A Spring Podcast Review/Preview

The hit podcast series Serial is in the midst of a new season on Guantanamo Bay, ten years after the first season was released and became a smash success. Vulture podcast critic Nick Quah joins for a Review/Preview on what new podcasts he's listening to this Spring, the state of the podcast industry, and we take your recommendations.This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen
4/29/202421 minutes, 7 seconds
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What Are You Reading Right Now?

With the hot weather today, you may begin to think about your next beach read. All Of It and Get Lit Producer Jordan Lauf brings a list of books she recommends checking out and we take your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen.
4/29/202417 minutes, 1 second
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How to Support Sexual Assault Survivors

Every 68 seconds someone in the United States is sexually assaulted, according to the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN). In honor of Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month (SAAM), we hear about efforts to help those in a crisis and tips for supporting survivors from Lynn M. Frederick-Hawley, MAc, the executive director of the Sexual Assault and Violence Intervention (SAVI) Program at Mount Sinai Hospital, and Luis Ramírez, LCSW, the founder of Rising Potential Counseling, PLLC. We also take your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen
4/29/202423 minutes, 19 seconds
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Priya Krishna's New Cookbook for Kids

Priya Krishna has helped audiences fall in love with cooking. In her latest cookbook, Priya's Kitchen Adventures, the New York Times food reporter helps children of all ages and comfort levels to cook international cuisine. Krishna joins us to talk about the book. Plus, we take calls from our listeners about any tips and tricks about cooking in the kitchen with kids.This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen. 
4/29/202428 minutes, 12 seconds
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Author Emmeline Clein on the Complexities of Disordered Eating

[REBROADCAST FROM March 11, 2024] Emmeline Clein's new collection of essays, Dead Weight, explores the writer's relationship with disordered eating, and provides a much-needed commentary on the historical, pop cultural and scientific approaches to the topic. We discuss the narratives so many women absorb about their body image and the dangerous pursuit to "self-shrink."This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/26/202428 minutes, 12 seconds
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Springtime is Plant Time

[REBROADCAST FROM February 28, 2024] Spring is here, and it's time to start thinking about how to help your houseplants and outdoor garden maximize the longer days and warmer weather. Christopher Satch, aka The Plant Doctor, joins to share tips and take your questions.This segment is guest-hosted by Matt Katz.
4/26/202416 minutes, 43 seconds
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The Books to Be Reading This Spring

[REBROADCAST FROM February 26, 2024] Spring is a busy time in the publishing world, with lots of new titles from big and up-and-coming authors. Jordan Lauf, All Of It and Get Lit book club producer, joins to give us her list of new books to check out and take your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Tiffany Hanssen.
4/26/202417 minutes, 46 seconds
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Managing Allergy Season

[REBROADCAST FROM March 6, 2024] April showers bring May flowers...and allergy season. We speak to two experts, Kenneth Mendez, the CEO of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, and Dr. Neeta Ogden, an allergist-immunologist, on how to best manage your allergies this season. Plus, we take your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/26/202414 minutes, 53 seconds
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Experiencing the Grief of Losing a Young Partner

[REBROADCAST FROM March 25, 2024] Amy Lin was newly married when her husband collapsed suddenly while running a half-marathon, and died. In her new memoir, Here After, Lin writes about the grief of losing her partner at such a young age, and how she managed to continue on. Lin joins us to discuss the book as part of our series Mental Health Mondays, and take calls from people who have experienced a similar loss.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/26/202423 minutes, 21 seconds
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Get Lit Preview with Stephen Graham Jones

[REBROADCAST FROM FEBRUARY 9, 2023] April Get Lit author Stephen Graham Jones tackles indigenous identity through his terrifying novels. In this month's pick, My Heart is a Chainsaw, Jones tells the story of a woman named Jade whose community is being torn up by a new celebrity development... and by a slasher on the loose. Ahead of our event, hear Jones discuss that book and its sequel, Don't Fear the Reaper. RSVP for Monday's Get Lit event with Stephen Graham Jones and musical guest Frank Waln here.
4/26/202411 minutes, 51 seconds
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Amplifying Drag Culture and Queer Joy in 'We're Here'

Emmy award-winning reality show "We're Here" focuses on spreading love and connection through the art of drag. In its latest season, four drag artists venture to Tennessee and Oklahoma to get an immersive look into how recent waves of anti-LGBTQ+ legislation have affected local communities. Executive producers Stephen Warren and Johnnie Ingram and drag artist Sasha Velour join us to discuss the fourth season, which makes its premiere on Max tomorrow.  This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/25/202423 minutes, 59 seconds
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'Koreaworld' Explores the Global Explosion of Korean Cuisine

Korean cuisine has become more and more popular globally in recent years. A new cookbook explores the roots of modern Korean cuisine, providing both recipes and reported pieces. Chef Deuki Hong and food writer Matt Robard join us to discuss Koreaworld: A Cookbook and take your calls. This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/25/202425 minutes, 34 seconds
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Storytelling through Shared Song with Chinatown Records

Chinatown Records 華埠錄音 is a project from DJ, cultural organizer and oral historian Rochelle Hoi-Yiu Kwan, aka YiuYiu 瑶瑶. What began with the inheritance of her father's records and tapes has grown into a collection that spans the 1920s to the 2000s as well as various community engagement projects. Through Chinatown Records 華埠錄音, Kwan leads listening parties and oral history sessions, and storytelling projects with Think!Chinatown. As All Of It continues to invite listeners to engage with music history and oral storytelling through the Public Song Project, Kwan stops by to discuss how she approaches her work, and take calls from listeners.*This segment is guest hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/24/202428 minutes
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A New Art Exhibit Explores the Vastness of LGBTQ Life

I'm a thousand different people—Every one is real is a new exhibition from the Leslie Lohman Museum of Art in Soho. Through various media and representational styles, this series aims to highlight the multidimensionality of the LGBTQ+ experience. Curator Stamatina Gregory, and artists Angela Dufresne and Carlos Motta join us to discuss the exhibition.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar 
4/24/202423 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Schomburg Black Comic Book Festival Returns

The Schomburg Center's Black Comic Book Festival returns for its twelfth year! The event features networking opportunities for up-and-coming comic book creators, artist conversations, cosplay, and a Black comics trivia challenge. The festival's executive producer Kadiatou Tubman joins us alongside author and visual artist Roye Okupe to preview this year's programming. We also take your calls about your favorite Black comics and characters. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
4/24/202424 minutes, 57 seconds
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Shabaka Performs Live from 'Perceive Its Beauty, Acknowledge Its Grace' (Live from CR5)

Following a shining ascendance within the UK jazz scene as a member of the acclaimed bands Sons of Kemet and The Comet Is Coming, last year Shabaka decided to put down the saxophone, the instrument on which he'd earned his fame, in favor of the flute. His new album, Perceive Its Beauty, Acknowledge Its Grace, is his first LP since making the pivot. He joins us live in the studio to perform.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/24/202425 minutes, 51 seconds
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An Inside Look At The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show

Pulitzer Prize finalist Tommy Tomlinson's new book, Dogland, is an inside account of the iconic Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. In the book, Tomlinson explores the question: Are those dogs happy? The question takes him on a deeper quest to understand the enduring relationships between dogs and humans. Tomlinson joins us to discuss. Plus, we hear from listeners about their love for their canine companions.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/23/202427 minutes, 4 seconds
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Leila Mottley's Debut Poetry Collection

Celebrated young writer Leila Mottley has followed up her debut novel with her debut poetry collection. She joins us to discuss Woke Up No Light, and read some poems in honor of National Poetry Month.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/23/202422 minutes, 32 seconds
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The Institutions of a 'Lost New York'

New York is always changing. As a result, buildings, institutions, and cultural spaces that were considered iconic in their time can sometimes be lost. A new exhibition at the New York Historical Society explores iconic places of a Lost New York, from the original Penn Station, to the Hippodrome Theatre, to the old Met Opera House. Wendy Nālani E. Ikemoto, vice president & chief curator at the New-York Historical Society, tells us more about this history and takes your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/23/202422 minutes, 47 seconds
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Amor Towles' New Short Story Collection, 'Table For Two'

Best-selling author Amor Towles (The Lincoln Highway, A Gentleman in Moscow), has just published a new short story collection, Table For Two, featuring six stories he wrote in the last ten years that are set in New York around the turn of the millennium. The book also includes a novella following Evelyn Ross, a character from Towles' first novel, Rules of Civility, as she travels to 1930s Los Angeles to try and make it in Hollywood.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/23/202428 minutes, 3 seconds
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How to Train for a Marathon While Incarcerated

The new documentary "26.2 to Life" follows a group of incarcerated men at San Quentin Prison who are training to run a marathon within the prison's walls. Director Christine Yoo joins us to discuss the film, which is available to stream now on ESPN+.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/22/202422 minutes, 51 seconds
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A Memoir About Living as a Sociopath (Mental Health Mondays)

From the time Patric Gagne was a kid, she knew there was something about her that was different from other kids. Later, she was diagnosed a sociopath. Gagne decided to work to destigmatize that diagnosis, and even became a therapist. She joins us to discuss her new book, Sociopath: A Memoir, as part of our series Mental Health Mondays.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
4/22/202427 minutes, 3 seconds
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How to 'Green' Your Life

In honor of Earth Day, we discuss ways to use less energy, create less waste and "green" your life with Wirecutter sustainability editor Katie Okamoto. Plus, we take your calls.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
4/22/202429 minutes, 11 seconds
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A Graphic Memoir About an Environmental Advocate

A new graphic memoir follows the life of Eddie Ahn, an environmental justice lawyer and activist fighting for diverse communities in San Francisco. Many of the people Ahn represents are facing the catastrophic effects of Californian wildfires, drought, climate change and economic inequality. Ahn joins us to discuss his new book, Advocate: A Graphic Memoir of Family, Community, and the Fight for Environmental Justice.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/22/202422 minutes, 2 seconds
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Cast of 'Dead Outlaw' Performs Live!

[REBROADCAST FROM April 3, 2024] "Dead Outlaw" is a new musical about the real-life American outlaw Elmer McCurdy and the larger-than-life image he gained after his death. The show's band takes center stage in the production, and we're joined for a live in-studio performance by Erik Della Penna, who wrote the show's music and lyrics, as well as music director Rebekah Bruce and musicians Jeb Brown, Chris Smylie,Spencer Cohen, and HANK. Actors Julia Knitel, Thom Sesma, and Allison Kupfer also join to perform their songs. "Dead Outlaw" is nominated for a Lucille Lortel Award for outstanding musical this year.*This segment was guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar*
4/19/202424 minutes, 32 seconds
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'Hell's Kitchen' Now on Broadway

[REBROADCAST FROM November 16, 2023] In the 1980s and '90s, Alicia Keys was a girl living with her mother in a small apartment off Times Square, with a dream of being a professional musician. Of course, we know how her life turned out. Keys is one of the creators of a new Broadway musical inspired by her early life in Manhattan, featuring original music and lyrics. "Hell's Kitchen" tells the story of Ali (Maleah Joi Moon), a 17-year-old who wants to make it big. To discuss the show, we're joined by director Michael Greif, book writer Kristoffer Diaz, and music supervisor Adam Blackstone. "Hell's Kitchen" is running at Shubert Theatre. "Hell's Kitchen" is nominated for a Lucille Lortel Award for outstanding musical this year.
4/19/202425 minutes, 36 seconds
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Italians Know How to Snack

[REBROADCAST FROM March 21, 2024] Charcuterie boards and aperitif hour are all the rage these days, but we could all stand to get more creative than putting some crackers and cheese on a board. Anna Francese Gass, author of the new cookbook Italian Snacking: Sweet and Savory Recipes for Every Hour of the Day, joins us to discuss the best way to snack like an Italian and take calls from listeners. *This segment was guest-hosted by David Furst*
4/19/202416 minutes, 57 seconds
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The Science of Flavor

[REBROADCAST FROM March 14, 2024] A new book explores the science of food, and explains how concepts from chemistry, biology and psychology can help bring more flavor and flexibility into the kitchen. It's called Flavorama: A Guide to Unlocking The Art and Science of Flavor. Arielle Johnson, flavor scientist and co-founder of Noma's 'fermentation lab' shares her insights from a lifetime of studying what makes things taste good.*This segment was guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar*
4/19/202416 minutes, 38 seconds
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The Story of Veselka in New Documentary

[REBROADCAST FROM February 22, 2024] Every New Yorker has a Veselka story. A new documentary follows second-generation owner Tom Birchard, as he plans to retire from running the beloved Ukrainian restaurant, an East Village staple. The film also follows the day to day of the restaurant in the midst of the war in Ukraine, and how the conflict affected the staff and changed what Veselka represents to New York's Ukrainian community. "Veselka: The Rainbow on the Corner at the Center of The World," is in select theaters tomorrow, and director Michael Fiore joins us alongside owners Tom and his son Jason Birchard to talk about the film, and we take your calls.*This segment was guest-hosted by David Furst*
4/19/202415 minutes, 10 seconds
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Why Is This Passover Different From Other Passovers?

Rabbi Matt Green, Associate Rabbi of Congregation Beth Elohim in Park Slope, discusses the story behind the Jewish holiday, and how its lessons about justice and liberation might be applied to the complex conflict in Gaza. Plus, listeners call in to share how they plan to include the issues facing the world today in their seders.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/18/202424 minutes, 49 seconds
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'Las Borinqueñas' Tells the True Story of Unethical Contraceptive Testing in Puerto Rico

In the 1950s, American doctor Gregory Pincus concocted a plan to test out his new contraceptive pill on Puerto Rican women, without warning them of the potential risks. A new play from Nelson Diaz-Marcano draws inspiration from that story to highlight the lives of five women who become involved with the trial. Diaz-Marcano and director Rebecca Aparicio join us to discuss,"Las Borinqueñas,"  which is running at the Ensemble Studio Theater through April 28.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/18/202425 minutes, 7 seconds
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Honoring Pearl Bowser's Contributions to Black Cinema at BAM

Pearl Bowser was an early expert in Black cinema, and helped uncover and shed light on the work of early Black filmmakers. A new retrospective at the Brooklyn Academy of Music seeks to honor her legacy. BAM president Gina Duncan joins us to discuss, The Boom Is Really An Echo: Selections from the Pearl Bowser Media Collection, alongside Pearl's daughter, co-curator Gillian Bowser. The retrospective runs from April 19-21.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/18/202425 minutes, 51 seconds
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A Beloved Lebanese Cookbook Gets an Update 50 Years Later (Food for Thought)

A little over 50 years ago, the original Lebanese Cuisine cookbook was published by Madelain Farah, featuring her mother's recipes from Lebanon. Though it was long before Middle Easter cuisine became popular in the United States, the book became a beloved hit with home cooks. Decades later, Farah's daughter has given the cookbook an update, with new photos and improved recipes. Leila Habib-Kirske joins us to discuss, Lebanese Cuisine: More than 185 Simple, Delicious Authentic Recipes, in honor of Arab American Heritage Month and as part of our ongoing series Food for Thought.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/18/202425 minutes, 43 seconds
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'Water for Elephants' Brings the Big Top to Broadway

In the new Broadway adaptation of the novel Water for Elephants, the actors and ensemble perform dizzying acrobatics and other tricks onstage to help bring the world of a Depression Era circus to life. Director Jessica Stone joins us to discuss translating this gorgeous love story to the stage, and Shana Carroll, co-choreographer and circus designer, joins to talk about adding acrobatics and circus performances to the show. "Water for Elephants"  is running now at the Imperial Theater.
4/17/202427 minutes, 54 seconds
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EMEL Performs 'MRA' (Live from CR5)

Tunisian-American singer-songwriter EMEL has been called the Voice Of The Tunisian Revolution, after a video of her song became popular during the Arab Spring around the release of her debut album. Just over a decade later, she's releasing a new album, MRA, this Friday. She joins us in the studio to perform songs from it live.
4/17/202422 minutes, 56 seconds
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Do's and Don'ts of Nannying and Babysitting

Finding a reliable, trustworthy, and cost-effective nanny or babysitter can be a headache. Even as a job-seeker, some might have trouble finding the right family (and child) to work with. To help us navigate the world of nannying, we're joined by Sarah Davis, who shares best practices for families and job-seekers. Davis is founder of Olive You Nanny, an agency that connects families with quality nannies. Plus, we take your calls.
4/17/202428 minutes, 49 seconds
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New Zealand-Australian Musician Jordan Rakei Previews His New Album, 'The Loop'

NPR's Tiny Desk producers called New Zealand born, Australian raised musician and singer Jordan Rakei's sound "easygoing and colorful." However, his latest studio album features a beautiful symphony of bold orchestral and soulful choral arrangements. He joins us to preview his forthcoming fifth studio album, "The Loop" and discuss his career as a musician.
4/17/202421 minutes, 15 seconds
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What is the Best Stephen King Novel? Let's Rank Them

50 years ago, Stephen King's debut novel Carrie was published, launching a new horror master, and one of the most prolific American writers of all time. In honor of the anniversary, we attempt to rank some of King's best novels with Neil McRobert, host of the Talking Scared Podcast and the author of the Esquire piece "All 75 Stephen King Books, Ranked." Plus, we take your calls.
4/16/202430 minutes, 29 seconds
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Saxophonist Melissa Aldana on 'Echoes Of The Inner Prophet' (Listening Party)

Grammy-nominated Chilean tenor saxophonist Melissa Aldana has just released her new album, Echoes Of The Inner Prophet, the title of which is dedicated to the late great jazz musician Wayne Shorter. The album features Aldana's quintet: Lage Lund on guitar and effects, Fabian Almazan on piano and effects, Pablo Menares on bass, and Kush Abadey on drums. Aldana joins us for an All Of It Listening Party.
4/16/202420 minutes, 27 seconds
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Jonathan Coulton for the Public Song Project, and Intellectual Property in the News

Jonathan Coulton discusses his cover of Irving Berlin's 1924 waltz "All Alone" for the Public Song Project. Then, we're joined by Michael Weinberg, executive director of the Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy at NYU, who breaks down some copyright jargon and the latest news in property law that you should know about, including who owns an A.I. creation.
4/16/202424 minutes, 35 seconds
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How To Read/Write Poetry

This Poetry Month, we want to explore poetry as a process, which consists of both writing, and reading poetry. Poet Uchenna Nduka, who teaches poetry at The New School, explains how poetry makes use of the inherent musicality of language to elevate feelings and observations about the world, and how looking both inward and outward are important pieces of rendering lived experience in the form of poems. 
4/16/202424 minutes, 50 seconds
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'The Sympathizer' Stars on the New HBO Drama

*The new HBO series, "The Sympathizer," adapts Viet Thanh Nguyen's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name for the screen. Stars Hoa Xuande and Fred Nguyen Khan discuss the series, about a Vietnamese spy who becomes a refugee in California and continues passing information to the Viet Cong. "The Sympathizer" airs new episodes Sunday nights at 9 pm.*This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
4/15/202426 minutes, 13 seconds
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Activist and Painter Mary Lovelace O'Neal's New Chelsea Gallery Show

For the last 60 years, activist and artist Mary Lovelace O'Neal's bold, large-scale paintings have explored mythology and deeply personal narratives. Now, she has a new solo show at the Marianne Boesky Gallery in Chelsea, which coincides with her inclusion in the 2024 Whitney Biennial. She joins us alongside the gallery's founder Marianne Boesky to discuss the show, titled HECHO EN MÉXICO—a mano.*This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/15/202421 minutes, 12 seconds
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Living with Generational Trauma and OCD in 'You Know What You Did'

In the new thriller novel, You Know What You Did, Annie Shaw seems to have it all: a dream career and a picture-perfect family. But after her mother - a troubled Vietnam War refugee - dies suddenly, Annie's carefully curated life beings to unravel. Her OCD, which she thought she'd vanquished years ago, comes roaring back. K.T. Nguyen, author and former magazine editor, joins us to discuss her debut novel and her personal journey with OCD and mental health.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/15/202420 minutes, 33 seconds
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A History of New York City Told Through its Restaurants

New York Magazine's latest cover story is a history of the city's most iconic restaurants and the people who frequented them over the last century. Food editor Alan Sytsma speaks more to the article, "Who Ate Where" and we take your calls.*This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
4/15/202430 minutes, 28 seconds
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The Role of Race And Identity in Shakespeare

[REBROADCAST FROM August 22, 2023] From "Othello" to "The Merchant of Venice," Shakespeare's plays often contain both nuanced and offensive portrayals of race. A new book from author and scholar Farah Karim Cooper examines the role of race in Shakespeare's work. It's titled, The Great White Bard: How to Love Shakespeare While Talking About Race. Cooper joins us to discuss.*This segment is guest hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/12/202419 minutes, 24 seconds
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Graphic Novel 'This Country' Explores Moving to Rural America

[REBROADCAST from August 23, 2023] A new graphic memoir from New Yorker cartoonist Navied Mahdavian tells the story of his decision to move with his wife from San Francisco to rural Idaho. Mahdavian joins us to discuss, This Country: Searching for Home in (Very) Rural America. Plus, we take your calls.*This segment is guest hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/12/202417 minutes, 13 seconds
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The Voyeuristic Aliens Of 'Landscape with Invisible Hand'

[REBROADCAST FROM August 23, 2023] An alien invasion reshapes the United States economy in a new science fiction comedy-drama, "Landscape with Invisible Hand." Director Cory Finley joins us to talk about the film which is based on M. T. Anderson's 2017 novel of the same name. "Landscape with Invisible Hand" is streaming on Prime Video.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.  
4/12/202417 minutes, 3 seconds
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Edan Lepucki's New Novel, "Time's Mouth"

[REBROADCAST FROM August 24, 2023] Edan Lepucki's latest novel, Time's Mouth, follows a woman who discovers an ability to time travel, which she then hones and transmits to other women. She joins us to discuss her book. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/12/202417 minutes, 57 seconds
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A New Frida Kahlo Documentary, Based on Her Diaries

[REBROADCAST FROM March 11, 2024] A new documentary tells the story of the beloved Mexican painter Frida Kahlo via her diaries, along with photos and colorful animations that make her paintings come alive onscreen. We speak to Carla Gutierrez, director of "Frida," about how the project came together.*This segment is guest hosted by Kousha Navidar 
4/12/202415 minutes, 12 seconds
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A Documentary Look At The Telemarketing Industry

[REBROADCAST FROM August 21, 2023] A new HBO docuseries explores the triumphs, challenges, and scams that are all part of the lives of telemarketers. The series is produced by the Safdie brothers, and directed by Adam Bhala Lough and Sam Lipman-Stern, who join us to discuss. Lipman-Stern worked as a telemarketer himself. "Telemarketers" is streaming now on MAX.*This segment is guest hosted by Kousha Navidar 
4/12/202415 minutes, 8 seconds
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See Indigenous Sculptor Rose B. Simpson's Work In NYC Parks

Today, indigenous artist Rose B. Simpson's new public art exhibition, Seed, is now on view at both Madison Square Park and Inwood Hill Park. The installations feature Simpson's sculpture work, which is also on view at this year's Whitney Biennial. There will also be public programs led by Simpson and other indigenous cultural leaders. Simpson joins to discuss her practice alongside Madison Square Park Conservancy curator Brooke Kamin Rapaport. Seed is on view through September 22.
4/11/202421 minutes, 39 seconds
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Sheet Pan Cooking: Recipes and Best Practices For Simple Oven Meals (Food For Thought)

For this week's Food For Thought series, hear about the recipes and techniques from the new cookbook Hot Sheet Sweet and Savory Sheet Pan Recipes for Every Day and Celebrations. Cookbook co-writers Olga Massov and Sanaë Lemoine share their favorites, and explain how to get the most of sheet pans.
4/11/202428 minutes, 20 seconds
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Leyla McCalla's 'Sun Without the Heat' (Listening Party)

Classical and folk musician Leyla McCalla's latest album features songs inspired by tropical Brazilian sounds, afrobeat and Ethiopian folk sounds. It's titled Sun Without the Heat, a literary reference to Frederick Douglass's 1857 speech to mostly white abolitionists six years before the Emancipation Proclamation. She joins us for a listening party ahead of her performance at Joe's Pub tomorrow at 7 p.m. McCalla was a cellist with the Grammy Award-winning string band Carolina Chocolate Drops before pursuing a solo career.
4/11/202423 minutes, 14 seconds
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A Documentary Tribute to 'Kim's Video'

The documentary "Kim's Video" is a tribute to the iconic video store in the East Village before it mysteriously closed its doors. But the film becomes a rescue mission to ensure the eternal preservation of the video collection. Youngman Kim, protagonist and owner of the video store, and director/writers Ashley Sabin and David Redbon discuss the film.
4/11/202427 minutes, 36 seconds
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Why Are Broadway Tickets So Expensive?

Changing attendance patterns, celebrity names, and dynamic pricing are partially behind the rise in ticket prices. Plus, says one academic, "there is no limit to what rich people will pay to see." Ryan Kailath is a culture and arts reporter for WNYC/Gothamist, and he joins us to discuss -- and take your calls. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
4/10/202426 minutes
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The New Age Bachelorette Party

As we prepare for wedding season, there are bachelorette parties also to be had and enjoyed. According to Brides Magazine, the bachelorette party has been evolving into a bigger and more drawn out event over recent years. Gabby Rello Duffy, Brides Magazine senior editorial director, joins to discuss bachelorette party etiquette, the do's and don'ts of planning this year, and take your calls.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
4/10/202424 minutes, 39 seconds
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Poetry, Jazz, and the Public Song Project with Nicole Zuraitis

For National Poetry Month and Jazz Appreciation Month, 2024 Grammy winner Nicole Zuraitis debuts her contribution for this year's Public Song Project, a jazz adaptation of two poems by Pulitzer Prize-winner Edna St Vincent Millay. We also discuss Zuraitis's career and her latest album, How Love Begins, which earned her the Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal Album.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
4/10/202427 minutes, 15 seconds
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A Retrospective of Photographer Corky Lee's Work Documenting Asian American and Pacific Islander Communities

A new book examines the legacy of the late photojournalist, Corky Lee's mission to document Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. Artist Chee Wang Ng and historian Mae Ngai edited the book, Corky Lee's Asian America: Fifty Years of Photographic Justice and join us to discuss. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar. 
4/10/202422 minutes, 48 seconds
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'The Writing on the Stall' is a Musical Inspired by Bathroom Graffiti

It seems that any public bathroom in a restaurant or bar has an endless number of random words, phrases, or vulgar language. Musician Caitlin Cook's off-Broadway musical, "The Writing on the Stall,"  inspired by the writing we all see on bathroom walls, has returned to Soho Playhouse through April 13. The show features song lyrics that Cook borrows from phrases she's observed in bathrooms. Cook joins us to discuss the show, and take your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/9/202425 minutes, 27 seconds
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Magnetic Fields: '69 Love Songs' (Silver Liner Notes)

In September 1999, the Stephin Merritt-led indie pop band The Magnetic Fields released 69 Love Songs, a three-hour concept album described by its writer as "not remotely an album about love. It’s an album about love songs, which are very far away from anything to do with love.” The release became a cult classic and ranks on all-time-greatest-albums lists from Rolling Stone, NME, and elsewhere. As part of our Silver Liner Notes series celebrating 25-year album anniversaries, we're joined by Merritt and bandmate Claudia Gonson, and we take your calls.The Magnetic Fields will take part in a Q&A at Film Forum following a Tuesday evening screening at Film Forum of the documentary STRANGE POWERS: STEPHIN MERRITT AND THE MAGNETIC FIELDS. Plus, tickets are still available for their run of shows at Town Hall in NYC this week. This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/9/202425 minutes, 20 seconds
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Eddie Izzard Tackles 'Hamlet' in Solo Show

Comedian and actor Eddie Izzard returns to New York for a limited run of the Shakespearean classic, "Hamlet."  In this theatrical rendition, the Tony Award nominee and Emmy winner takes on all 23 characters. The show is running now, at the Orpheum Theater until April 14. Izzard joins us to talk about her performance.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/9/202426 minutes, 58 seconds
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A Magical Journey to Golden-Age Spain from Leigh Bardugo

The latest novel from acclaimed fantasy writer Leigh Bardugo follows a scullery maid in Golden Age Spain named Luzia who has magical powers. When her employer discovers these powers, she forces Luzia to demonstrate them to people around the city of Madrid, eventually catching the eye of some very powerful people. But Luzia needs to be careful to avoid the Inquisition, and make sure no one looks too carefully into her secret Jewish heritage. Leigh Bardugo joins us to discuss her new novel, The Familiar.Event: Bardugo will be speaking tonight at the Union Square Barnes and Nobel at 6 pm.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/9/202423 minutes, 3 seconds
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The Science Of The Moon, The Sun, And The Eclipse

Today, the NYC metro area will get a nearly-complete view of a total solar eclipse, which won't happen again in our region until 2044. Rebecca Boyle, science writer and author of the book, OUR MOON: How Earth’s Celestial Companion Transformed the Planet, Guided Evolution, and Made Us Who We Are, joins us from the path of totality at Atlas Obscura’s Ecliptic Festival in Arkansas' Hot Springs National Park, to explain the science of the celestial bodies involved in this special cosmic experience.
4/8/202411 minutes, 55 seconds
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Soprano Rachel Willis-Sørensen on Debut Carnegie Hall Recital

Tomorrow is the debut New York recital of American soprano singer Rachel Willis-Sørensen, who will use the concert to honor late mezzo-soprano Ariel Bybee. Since growing up in Tri-Cities, Washington, Willis-Sørensen is now signed to the famous Sony Classical label, and is a common sight in Opera houses around the world. This fall, she will be returning to The Met to star in "Il Trovatore." Willis-Sørensen joins to preview her Carnegie Hall concert, discuss the role of Opera in the world today, and her efforts to educate the next generation of singers.
4/8/202412 minutes, 53 seconds
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Tiny Habits Perform (Live from Five)

The close harmony trio Tiny Habits formed at Berklee College of Music in 2022 and have quickly become a fan favorite in the world of indie folk-pop. Cinya Khan, Maya Rae, and Judah Mayowa join to perform live in our studio.
4/8/202424 minutes, 30 seconds
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Tips for Facing Loneliness

Recently, the United States Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy warned the public of an epidemic of loneliness which experts say is detrimental to mental and physical health. Dr. Jeremy Nobel founded The Foundation for Art & Healing and launched an initiative called Project UnLonely to combat loneliness through creative expression. He joins us to talk about how we could face the implications of loneliness and how we can face it together.
4/8/202424 minutes, 47 seconds
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Alex Garland's 'Civil War'

Acclaimed director Alex Garland joins us to discuss his latest film, "Civil War," which follows a group of journalists embedded within the military in the midst of a modern United States civil war. "Civil War" stars Kirsten Dunst, Wagner Moura, Jesse Plemons, Nick Offerman and more, and premieres in theaters on April 12.
4/8/202426 minutes, 50 seconds
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WNYC's Matt Katz Uncovers Family Secrets in New Podcast

WNYC reporter Matt Katz didn't really know much about his father. He at least thought he knew who his father was, that is until he took a DNA test. The results spurred him to investigate the truth behind his very existence. He recorded the whole journey, which took him from California to Ireland. He tells the story in his new podcast, Inconceivable Truth, which released today. Katz joins us to discuss.
4/4/202424 minutes, 13 seconds
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Where to Watch the Eclipse in New York

Even though New York City is not in the path of totality for the upcoming solar eclipse, we will experience 90% obstruction. Bart Fried of the Amateur Astronomers Association joins us to talk about where to view the eclipse in our area and how to do so safely.
4/4/202411 minutes, 22 seconds
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Eater's Guide to New York City

Eater just released The Eater Guide to New York City, the digital publication's first-ever comprehensive guidebook to the city's best restaurants, food trucks, specialty shops and farmers' markets. Stephanie Wu, Eater's editor-in-chief, joins us to discuss. Plus, we take calls from listeners.
4/4/202414 minutes, 14 seconds
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'Law & Order' Composer's First Album in 30 Years (Listening Party)

Composer Mike Post is best known for creating the memorable theme song of the long-running police procedural, "Law & Order." Now he's releasing his first album in 30 years, Message from the Mountains & Echoes of the Delta, celebrating the bluegrass and blues music that has inspired him throughout his career. Post joins us for a Listening Party.
4/4/202420 minutes, 19 seconds
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'Girls State' Shows Young Women Finding Their Political Voice

In the follow-up to their award-winning documentary "Boys State," directors Amanda McBaine and Jesse Moss have decided to cover the sister American Legion program, Girls State. McBaine and Moss embedded among teenage girls in Missouri who attended a one-week Girls State camp, where they are tasked with building a government from the ground up. They join us to discuss "Girls State,"  which premieres tomorrow on Apple TV Plus. 
4/4/202430 minutes, 32 seconds
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Live Session with 'Dead Outlaw' the Musical

"Dead Outlaw" is a new musical about the real-life American outlaw Elmer McCurdy and the larger-than-life image he gained after his death. The show's band takes center stage in the production, and we're joined for a live in-studio performance by Erik Della Penna, who wrote the show's music and lyrics, as well as music director Rebekah Bruce and bandmembers Jeb Brown, Chris Smylie, Spencer Cohen, and HANK. Actors Julia Knitel and Thom Sesma also join to perform their songs. Produced by Audible Theater, Dead Outlaw plays at the Minetta Lane Theatre until April 14 and will also be released as an Audible Original later this year.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/3/202425 minutes, 12 seconds
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Unpacking This Year's 'Craziest' College Admissions Season

This year's college admissions season has been the "craziest" ever, according to education journalist and author Jeffrey Selingo. Applicants to Common Application colleges are up 6 percent - the highest on record. Plus, with a recent calculation error by the Department of Education, FAFSA-eligible students are left in the dark about their financial aid status. Selingo joins us for a deep dive on this year's college application conundrum. Plus, we take listener calls.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/3/202429 minutes, 10 seconds
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How to Behave During Wedding Season

That new "Save the Date" in your mailbox means wedding season is approaching. Nick Leighton of the Were You Raised By Wolves? podcast joins us to take your calls and discuss the correct ways to comport oneself on someone else's big day.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/3/202421 minutes, 38 seconds
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Alice Randall Is Proof That Country Music Is Black

Alice Randall is a household name in country music. She was the first Black woman to co-write a #1 country hit, "XXX's and OOO's." She reflects on her career in her latest book "My Black Country." It also examines the impact of Black tradition and culture on this "most American of art forms." Randall joins us to talk about the book (out on April 9), and teases out some songs from her forthcoming tribute album, to be released on April 12th. *This Segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
4/3/202425 minutes, 32 seconds
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Public Libraries & the Public Song Project

With the deadline for the Public Song Project less than six weeks away, now is the time to get your songs recorded! Submissions can come in all shapes and sizes -- we are more than happy to accept songs recorded entirely on your cell phone or laptop! But if you want to step things up a bit, one great resource is your local public library. Today we're joined by representatives from the Brooklyn Public Library, New York Public Library, and Westport Public Library in Connecticut to hear about free recording studios, an instrument loan program, thousands of sheet music books, and more resources for exploring the public domain and recording your songs. Guests include Christine Schonhart, the director of Brooklyn Public Library's central library; Jenna Li, Lead Media Lab Specialist for New York Public Library; Brendan Toller, Marketing Manager of Verso Studios at the Westport Public Library.You can find more about these resources on the Public Song Project homepage, as well as more information about how to participate: https://www.wnyc.org/story/public-song-project-2024/.
4/3/202414 minutes, 40 seconds
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Poet Caridad de la Luz Performs Live (Get Lit)

We air highlights from our March Get Lit with All Of It book club event with author Xochitl Gonzales. We spent the month reading her novel, Anita de Monte Laughs Last. We were also joined for a special performance from Caridad de la Luz, spoken word poet, singer-songwriter, and executive director of the Nuyorican Poets Cafe. The conversation was hosted by All Of It producer Simon Close.
4/2/202416 minutes, 23 seconds
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They Might Be Giants for the Public Song Project

John Flansburgh and John Linnell of They Might Be Giants join to announce their cover of Irving Berlin's "Lazy" for the 2024 Public Song Project. The band will be releasing their song on streaming platforms later this month, and will be putting out limited edition 7" records. They join us with an exclusive preview of the song.With the deadline for the Public Song Project less than six weeks away, now is the time to get your songs recorded! Submissions can come in all shapes and sizes -- we are more than happy to accept songs recorded entirely on your cell phone or laptop! But if you want to step things up a bit, one great resource is your local public library. Today we're joined by representatives from the Brooklyn Public Library, New York Public Library, and Westport Public Library in Connecticut to hear about free recording studios, an instrument loan program, thousands of sheet music books, and more resources for exploring the public domain and recording your songs. Guests include Christine Schonhart, the director of Brooklyn Public Library's central library; Jenna Li, Lead Media Lab Specialist for New York Public Library; Brendan Toller, Marketing Manager of Verso Studios at the Westport Public Library.You can find more about these resources on the Public Song Project homepage, as well as more information about how to participate: https://www.wnyc.org/story/public-song-project-2024/.
4/2/202427 minutes, 10 seconds
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The NCAA Women's Basketball Tournament Heads to the Final Four

Yesterday marked the end of the Elite 8 round of the NCAA Women's Basketball Tournament, with Iowa, UCONN, NC State, and South Carolina all advancing to the Final Four. This year's tournament has received more national attention due to Iowa star Caitlin Clark playing in her final March Madness, but also because the competition is packed with stars, including an undefeated South Carolina team. To recap the tournament thus far and preview the Final Four this Friday, we're joined by Carolyn Peck, ESPN commentator, former head coach, and member of the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. Plus, we take your calls.
4/2/202423 minutes, 58 seconds
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Xochitl Gonzales on 'Anita de Monte Laughs Last' (Get Lit)

We air highlights from our March Get Lit with All Of It book club event with author Xochitl Gonzales. We spent the month reading her novel, Anita de Monte Laughs Last, which tells the story of two women, a once-famous artist named Anita de Monte, who died tragically and has been mostly forgotten to history, and Raquel, the student who decides to look into Anita's story for her senior thesis. But the deeper Raquel digs into this story, the more she starts to wonder if her own story is starting to mirror Anita's. Gonzales speaks about the book, and takes questions from our audience. The conversation was hosted by All Of It producer Jordan Lauf.
4/2/202433 minutes, 26 seconds
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'The Notebook' is Now a Broadway Musical

The beloved film "The Notebook" has now gotten a Broadway musical makeover, with new original music from singer-songwriter Ingrid Michaelson, a new adapted book, and innovative direction from Michael Greif and Schele Williams. Michaelson, Grief, and Williams join us to discuss the show, which is running now at the Schoenfeld Theatre.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/1/202428 minutes, 5 seconds
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Nona Faustine's 'White Shoe' Photographs at the Brooklyn Museum

A new exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum presents the work of Brooklyn-born photographer Nona Faustine, specifically her series, White Shoes, where she poses (sometimes nude) in white heels in front of New York City historical sites that have a connection to slavery. Faustine joins to discuss her practice and first solo museum exhibition, Nona Faustine: White Shoes, on view at the Brooklyn Museum through July 7.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/1/202422 minutes, 36 seconds
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Humor, Humanity and April Fools

To celebrate April Fools' Day, we talk with Moira Marsh, author of Practically Joking, University of Indiana liaison librarian for Anthropology, Folklore, and Sociology, and manager of the Modern Language Association Folklore Bibliography Project, about the social value and human history of pranks. Plus, listeners call in to share their stories of executing or falling victim to practical jokes.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/1/202427 minutes, 48 seconds
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How to Navigate Menopause

A new book, The Menopause Brain, dispels the myth that menopause signifies an end for women, demonstrating that it’s actually just a transition. Dr. Lisa Mosconi, PhD, and director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Program at WCM/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, joins us to discuss the effects of menopause on the brain, and take your calls.This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
4/1/202423 minutes, 31 seconds
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Bettye LaVette: LaVette! (A Listening Party)

[REBROADCAST FROM January 18, 2024] Bettye LaVette recorded her first single at the age of sixteen and soon made her debut on the R&B charts in the early 1960s. Six decades later, now in her late 70s, she's still singing, with her latest album LaVette! which was nominated for the Grammy for Best Contemporary Blues Album. She joins us for a Listening Party.
3/29/202425 minutes, 53 seconds
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'The Persian Version' Director Maryam Keshavarz

[REBROADCAST FROM November 2, 2023] Based on a true story… sort of, "The Persian Version" tells the story of an Iranian-American screenwriter, Leila, who discovers a family secret while rebelling against her mother's expectations for her. Writer and director Maryam Keshavarz joins us to discuss the film. 
3/29/202424 minutes, 17 seconds
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'Nanny' Film Shows the Horror of Exploitative Labor

[REBROADCAST FROM December 1, 2022] The film "Nanny" from writer and director Nikyatu Jusu won the top prize at the 2022 Sundance Film Festival. Jusu joins us to discuss the film, which combines elements of African folklore with horror to tell the story of a Senegalese immigrant hired to care for a white child.
3/29/202416 minutes, 45 seconds
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Alex Borstein on 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel' and Her Musical Comedy Special

[REBROADCAST FROM April 26, 2023] Three-time Emmy winner Alex Borstein joins us to discuss her role as Susie Myerson in “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” filming the final season and her musical comedy special, “Alex Borstein: Corsets & Clown Suits,” out now on Prime Video. 
3/29/202417 minutes, 26 seconds
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Allison Russell's 'The Returner'

[REBROADCAST FROM August 23, 2023] On September 8, Canadian singer-songwriter Allison Russell released The Returner, the follow-up to her critically acclaimed solo debut, Outside Child. She stops by our studios to preview the album and perform a live song.
3/29/202417 minutes, 38 seconds
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A Vegan BBQ and Soul Food Cookbook (Food For Thought)

In 2018, Toriano Gordon decided to open his own barbecue restaurant in downtown San Francisco, however, his wife reminded him they’d just decided to go vegan. Instead, he invited his family over to try plant-based brisket which led to his Oakland soul food and BBQ restaurant. Gordon joins us to share recipes from his debut cookbook, Vegan Mob: Vegan BBQ and Soul Food.
3/28/202429 minutes, 8 seconds
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Cakes da Killa's Black Sheep (A Listening Party)

Last week, Hip Hop artist Cakes da Killa released his third album, Black Sheep which demonstrated a metamorphosis in his sound. The Fader called it "irresistible dance music in the vein of Kylie Minogue or KAYTRANADA." He joins us to discuss his music career thus far, forging a unique sound, and his inspirations for his latest album.
3/28/202420 minutes, 56 seconds
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Baseball's Origin Story is a New York Story, and Vice Versa

Baseball was created in New York, and in turn it also helped create New York. In his new book, The New York Game: Baseball and the Rise of a New City, author Kevin Baker makes the case that the game and the city are intertwined.
3/28/202429 minutes, 38 seconds
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Trans Day of Visibility: An Intergenerational Conversation

In honor of the upcoming Trans Day of Visibility (March 31), we speak to two trans activists and educators across different generations: Sterling Cruz-Herr, equity consultant and writer of Transgenerational: Trans Lives Across Time, a series that highlights the contributions of trans elders throughout contemporary history, and Cisne Cisneros, organizer of Body Hack, a Brooklyn-based nightlife collective for young trans and nonbinary individuals. Plus, we take calls from our listeners.
3/28/202421 minutes, 34 seconds
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Sharing Asian-American History through Folk Music (Listening Party)

No-No Boy is a folk music project from Julian Saporiti that began as a Brown University PhD researching Asian American history. The stories and figures in Saporiti's songs include a Cambodian American painter, survivors of Japanese internment, and many others from a wide array of Asian American identities. Ahead of a Joe's Pub show on March 29, Saporiti joins us to discuss his work.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/27/202421 minutes, 41 seconds
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The Historic Brooklyn Paramount Theater Reopens

Today, the historic Brooklyn Paramount theater is reopening to the public, with acts like Norah Jones, PinkPantheress, and Black Country, New Road all slated to perform in the coming months. The venue first opened in downtown Brooklyn in 1928, as a movie theater and also a stage, featuring acts like Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, and early Rock 'n' Roll. But in 1962, the theater closed and was converted into a university basketball gym, that is until now. Ron Schweiger, Brooklyn's official borough historian, joins to recount the history of this important local venue and take listener calls for their memories.*This segment is guest-hosted  by Kousha Navidar 
3/27/202428 minutes, 26 seconds
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Making The Most Of Local Bars

With all the options available, it's not always easy to choose a bar to enjoy a libatious night out. Bryan Kim, NYC Senior Staff Writer and resident bar expert at The Infatuation, formerly a bartender himself, shares his favorite watering holes, old and new, around New York City, and his bar etiquette tips. Plus, listeners call in to share their favorite local watering holes. *This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/27/202419 minutes, 23 seconds
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Over 20 Years of 'Top Chef' with Gail Simmons

The beloved cooking competition show "Top Chef" is returning for its 21st season today. We are joined by "Top Chef" judge and cookbook author Gail Simmons, who has been with the show since it began in 2006 and can discuss how the series, culinary trends, and qualifications for what makes a "top chef" have changed over the decades. Plus, we'll take calls from listeners about their favorite "Top Chef" moments. "Top Chef" airs new episodes on Thursday nights on Bravo.  *This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/27/202431 minutes, 35 seconds
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The Anatomy of a Movie Poster

Designer Dawn Baillie's portfolio includes posters for films such as "Dirty Dancing," "Little Miss Sunshine" and "Silence of the Lambs."  Now, a new exhibition at Poster House, The Anatomy of a Movie Poster: The Work of Dawn Baillie, explores her work in a career spanning four decades. Ballie joins us alongside curator Angelina Lippert to discuss the show, on display through September 8.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar*
3/26/202420 minutes
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Hear Some New 'Public Song Project' Submissions

All Of It producer Simon Close joins to give an update on the 2024 Public Song Project — you still have six weeks to submit! — and share two new submissions, both originally by Irving Berlin, for the WNYC Public Songbook: Daneshevskaya's take on "What'll I Do," and Jonathan Coulton's adaptation of "All Alone" which Berlin composed in 1923 and 1924 respectively. 
3/26/202413 minutes, 37 seconds
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Exploring Queer Black Life in Clifford Prince King's Photography

In his latest project, "Let me know when you get home," photographer Clifford Prince King explores the vastness of the queer Black experience through portraiture. His series is part of a public photo project curated by the Public Art Fund. They can be found on bus shelters and newsstands across New York, Chicago and Boston until May 26. King joins the show to discuss his work.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar*
3/26/202415 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Science and Medical Practice Behind Mifepristone and Other Birth Control

The Supreme Court is hearing oral arguments in one of the most closely-watched cases this term, centering on access to mifepristone, the commonly used abortion pill. We talk about contraception and birth control with Dr. Kristyn Brandi.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar*
3/26/202413 minutes, 4 seconds
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IUD Insertion Can Really Hurt. What Is Being Done About It?

An IUD is one of the most effective forms of birth control, but many of the patients who choose to have one inserted experience intense pain, with little preparation. Why can IUDs be so painful, and what is being done about it? Alisha Haridasani Gupta, a New York Times reporter focusing on women's health, joins us to discuss her piece "Getting an IUD Hurts. Why Aren’t More Women Offered Relief?" and take calls from listeners.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar*
3/26/202420 minutes, 41 seconds
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Unpacking The Supreme Court's Mifepristone Case

With the Supreme Court hearing arguments this morning over the FDA's approval of a medication abortion drug called Mifepristone, Shefali Luthra, health reporter covering the intersection of gender and healthcare at The 19th, discusses the case, what it means for the broader landscape of reproductive health policy across the United States, as well as other related issues like in-vitro fertilization, and Donald Trump's recent support for a national abortion ban.*This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar*
3/26/202416 minutes, 39 seconds
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'Love Lies Bleeding,' A Seductive Thriller Take on Sapphic Love

In the new film "Love Lies Bleeding," a reclusive gym manager Lou (Kristen Stewart), falls in love with an ambitious bodybuilder named Jackie. But after a deadly incident, the pair's lives - and love - are put at risk. Director Rose Glass and actor Katy O'Brian, who plays Jackie, join us to discuss.
3/25/202425 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Grief of Losing a Partner at a Young Age (Mental Health Mondays)

Amy Lin was newly married when her husband collapsed suddenly while running a half-marathon, and died. In her new memoir, Here After, Lin writes about the grief of losing her partner at such a young age, and how she managed to continue on. Lin joins us to discuss the book as part of our series Mental Health Mondays, and take calls from people who have experienced a similar loss.
3/25/202426 minutes, 34 seconds
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Empress Of: 'For Your Consideration' (Listening Party)

Lorely Rodriguez, who performs as Empress Of, emerged from the world of electropop with a debut album that led Pitchfork to call her "an avant-R&B auteur with pop star potential." On her fourth album, "For Your Consideration", released last Friday, she's rising to that potential, with songs she describes as "more pop-sounding than anything I’ve ever done." Rodriguez joins us for a Listening Party.
3/25/202423 minutes, 48 seconds
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Aoife O'Donovan's Sings Women's History (Live from Five)

Aoife O'Donovan's new album, All My Friends, came out of a request for the singer-songwriter to write music commemorating the centennial of the 19th amendment. The result is a record in tribute to suffragist Carrie Chapman Catt. O'Donovan joins us to perform songs live in our studio.
3/25/202425 minutes, 46 seconds
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'To Kill a Tiger' follows One Indian Farmer's Quest for Justice

[REBROADCAST FROM October 20, 2023] The documentary "To Kill a Tiger"  follows the story of Ranjit, an Indian farmer on a quest for justice after his 13-year-old daughter is gang-raped. Director Nisha Pahuja joins us to discuss this difficult but vital film.
3/22/202417 minutes, 5 seconds
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How Jennifer Lame Cut Best Picture Winner 'Oppenheimer'

[REBROADCAST FROM February 13, 2024] For our annual series, "The Big Picture," celebrating Oscar nominees working behind the camera, we spoke with Jennifer Lame. She won an Oscar for her work editing the Christopher Nolan film, "Oppenheimer."  We speak with Lame about nailing the Trinity Test sequence, editing for IMAX, and more.
3/22/202418 minutes, 38 seconds
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25 Years of 'The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill' (Silver Liner Notes)

[REBROADCAST FROM August 24, 2023] Onetime Fugees frontwoman Lauryn Hill released her solo album, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, on August 25, 1998. It debuted at number one on the album charts, won the Grammy for album of the year, and is now considered by many to be one of the greatest albums of all time. To date, it remains Hill’s only solo studio album. As part of our 25th-anniversary album series Silver Liner Notes, we’re joined by poet, essayist, and author Hanif Abdurraqib to discuss the album’s legacy and Lauryn Hill’s career. Also joining is Karen Good Marable, who wrote the 1998 Vibe cover story on Hill. This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar.
3/22/202418 minutes, 46 seconds
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Corinne Bailey Rae on 'Black Rainbows' (Listening Party)

[REBROADCAST FROM September 7, 2023] Corinne Bailey Rae returns with her first album in seven years, Black Rainbows. The album was inspired by Rae's visits to the Stony Island Arts Bank in Chicago, a gallery/library/community center dedicated to Black art and history. She joins us for a Listening Party.This segment is guest-hosted by David Furst.
3/22/202416 minutes, 53 seconds
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Shaina Taub on 'SUFFS'

[REBROADCAST FROM May 9, 2022] Composer and performer Shaina Taub is the creator of the musical, "SUFFS,"  which was a hit off-Broadway show in 2022. Taub starred as Alice Paul, one of the leaders of the suffragist movement and the campaign for the 19th Amendment. The musical is now opening on Broadway, with previews beginning at Music Box Theatre on March 26. We revisit our conversation with Taub from when the show first premiered off-Broadway.
3/22/202414 minutes, 19 seconds
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The Life of Groundbreaking Journalist Maggie Higgins

[REBROADCAST FROM November 30, 2023] A new biography captures the life of groundbreaking New York Herald Tribune reporter Maggie Higgins, who rose to prominence after her reporting on the liberation of Dachau following World War II. Her coverage of the Korean War won her a Pulitzer Prize, but her reputation as a journalist was often questioned by men in power who wondered if she was using her good looks to get the scoop. Author Jennet Conant joins us to discuss her new book, Fierce Ambition: The Life and Legend of War Correspondent Maggie Higgins.
3/22/202416 minutes, 6 seconds
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A Battle of the Sandwiches

For March Madness, Serious Eats spotlights 64 signature sandwiches from cities across the U.S. as they go head-to-head in a single-elimination tournament. Sr. Culinary Director Daniel Gritzer joins us to talk about the bracket for this year's competition and talk about some of the most iconic recipes.*This episode is guest-hosted by David FurstCheck out their Starch Madness bracket here: https://www.seriouseats.com/starch-madness-2024-8576506
3/21/202421 minutes, 52 seconds
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How to Snack Like the Italians (Food For Thought)

Charcuterie boards and aperitif hour are all the rage these days, but we could all stand to get more creative than putting some crackers and cheese on a board. Anna Francese Gass, author of the new cookbook Italian Snacking: Sweet and Savory Recipes for Every Hour of the Day, joins us to discuss the best way to snack like an Italian and take calls from listeners. *This episode is guest-hosted by David Furst
3/21/202427 minutes, 46 seconds
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The 2024 Whitney Biennial Opens to the Public

The 2024 Whitney Biennial has just opened to the public. The biennial is always a must-see exhibition in the New York contemporary art world, and this year it's titled, Whitney Biennial 2024: Even Better Than the Real Thing, featuring work from seventy one artists. Curators Chrissie Iles and Meg Onli joins to discuss the show, which is on view through August 11. 
3/21/202421 minutes, 57 seconds
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Journalist Natasha S. Alford's New Memoir, 'American Negra'

Award-winning journalist and media executive Natasha S. Alford explores her multi-ethnic identity as a Black Puerto Rican, recounts her upbringing in Syracuse, New York, and discusses the origins of her career. She joins us to discuss her debut memoir, American Negra.
3/21/202428 minutes, 39 seconds
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'Femme,' A Queer Thriller on Betrayal and Desire

In "Femme," Jules, a drag artist, survives a brutal attack by a man outside a nightclub. Months later, Jules recognizes the attacker by chance at a sauna, which sparks a forbidden relationship between the two. Jules comes up with a plan to take his revenge. Director Sam Freeman, along with actor Nathan Stewart-Jarrett who plays Jules, join us to talk about their latest film, out on March 22.
3/20/202418 minutes
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The Lemon Twigs (Live from Five)

Hicksville, Long Island natives The Lemon Twigs have built a reputation for grand pop songs that harken back to the psychedelia and prog rock of the 1960s and 70s. The lead singles for their forthcoming album, A Dream Is All We Know, promise more of their masterful pastiche. Brothers and bandmates Brian and Michael D'Addario join us live in studio five to perform.
3/20/202430 minutes, 54 seconds
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A New Memoir Offers A Lesson on Living Life

In her new memoir, cultural influencer Lyn Slater explains how she followed her passions and started her fashion blog, Accidental Icon, at age sixty-one. She joins us to discuss aging gracefully and her book, How to Be Old: Lessons in Living Boldly from the Accidental Icon.
3/20/202426 minutes, 18 seconds
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Rosalind Chao Stars in '3 Body Problem'

The ambitious new Netflix series, "3 Body Problem," adapts the bestselling sci-fi novel by Chinese writer Cixin Liu, which centers on version of reality in which humans have successfully managed to make contact with aliens. Rosalind Chao joins us to discuss starring in the series as enigmatic scientist Ye Wenjie. "3 Body Problem" premieres on Netflix tomorrow.
3/20/202424 minutes, 26 seconds
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'The Seven Year Disappear' Pokes Fun at Performance Art

In the new play, "The Seven Year Disappear," Cynthia Nixon stars as Miriam, a famous performance artist who disappears for seven years, living behind her son Naphtali (Taylor Trensch) to pick up the pieces until she returns. Nixon, Trensch, and playwright Jordan Seavey join us to discuss the show, which runs at The Pershing Square Signature Center through March 31.
3/19/202432 minutes
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Artist Rusty Zimmerman on The Free Portrait Project

Since 2015, local artist Rusty Zimmerman has painted free portraits of his fellow New Yorkers, while also recording oral history interviews for what he calls The Free Portrait Project. Last year, he painted two hundred portraits of South Brooklyn residents, and a new exhibit compiling the portraits, We Are South Brooklyn, is on view at Industry City’s Building 8 through March 24. Zimmerman joins to discuss the show, his portrait practice, and the importance of The Free Portrait Project.
3/19/202417 minutes, 6 seconds
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Choreographing Sufjan Stevens' 'Illinoise'

"Illinoise"  is a new dance adaptation of the seminal Sufjan Stevens album, with a story by Tony-winning choreographer Justin Peck and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Jackie Sibblies Drury. The show runs at Park Avenue Armory through March 26, then transfers to Broadway starting April 24. Drury and Peck, who also directed and choreographed the production, join us.
3/19/202432 minutes, 43 seconds
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Percival Everett's Re-telling of Huck Finn in 'James'

Author Percival Everett had a big year, with the adaptation of his novel Erasure, "American Fiction," taking home the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay. Now, he's written a new novel, a retelling of the story of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  through the perspective of Jim, the enslaved man who joins Huck's journey. Everett joins us to discuss James.
3/19/202419 minutes, 4 seconds
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A Blind Undocumented Social Worker's Journey in "Unseen"

As a blind, undocumented immigrant, Pedro faces uncertainty to obtain his college degree, become a social worker, and support his family. We're joined by director Set Hernandez to discuss the documentary, which has its broadcast premiere today on PBS.
3/18/202417 minutes, 47 seconds
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What Makes a 'Great American Novel?'

There are many contenders for the "Great American Novel" -- Moby Dick, The Great Gatsby, To Kill A Mockingbird, Beloved, etc. Last week, The Atlantic attempted to capture the scope of "Great American Novels" of the last 100 years. Senior editor Gal Beckerman joins us to discuss how the 136-book list came together and we take your calls.
3/18/202432 minutes, 16 seconds
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Nowruz Celebrations, Food, and Customs

Tomorrow is Nowruz, the Persian New Year! Nasim Alikhani, chef & owner of Sofreh and author of the cookbook Sofreh: A Contemporary Approach to Classic Persian Cuisine, joins us to discuss how she celebrates the New Year and provide some culinary tips ahead of the holiday. Plus, we take calls!
3/18/202422 minutes, 55 seconds
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How to Develop a Practical Optimist Outlook on Life

In the aughts, Dr. Sue Varma became the first medical director and attending psychiatrist to the World Trade Center Mental Health Program at NYU Langone Health, treating civilians and first-responders in the aftermath of 9/11. Now, she has a new book that provides tools for navigating life’s challenges with a proactive and constructive approach. In this installment of Mental Health Mondays, Dr. Varma joins us to discuss her book, Practical Optimism: The Art, Science, and Practice of Exceptional Well-Being.
3/18/202428 minutes, 39 seconds
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Harpist Brandee Younger on Dorothy Ashby and NAACP Image Award-Winning Album

[REBROADCAST FROM April 6, 2023] Brandee Younger returns to the show, this time in-studio, to perform songs live from her new album, Brand New Life. The album celebrates the work of trailblazing jazz harpist Dorothy Ashby and features contributions from Pete Rock, 9th Wonder, Meshell Ndegeocello and Makaya McCraven.
3/15/202411 minutes, 40 seconds
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Poet Kwame Alexander's NAACP Image Award-Nominated Memoir, 'Why Fathers Cry at Night'

[REBROADCAST FROM May 23, 2023] Newbery-winning author and poet Kwame Alexander is a beloved children's book author, but now he is sharing more of his life and story with adult readers. Alexander joins us to discuss his new memoir, Why Fathers Cry at Night: A Memoir in Love Poems, Letters, Recipes, and Remembrances, which tells the story of his parents, and his own journey as a father.
3/15/202420 minutes, 15 seconds
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Bethann Hardison's Story Captured in NAACP Image Award-Winning Documentary, 'Invisible Beauty'

[REBROADCAST FROM September 25, 2023] "Invisible Beauty" documents the life of pioneering fashion icon Bethann Hardison, who was one of the first Black models and went on to operate a successful modeling agency promoting models of color. She joins to discuss the film with co-director Frédéric Tcheng.
3/15/202418 minutes, 15 seconds
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NAACP Image Award-Nominated 'Story Ave' is an Ode to the Bronx

[REBROADCAST FROM October 6, 2023] "Story Ave" is a new debut feature independent film from Bronx-born writer and director Aristotle Torres. The movie tells the story of Bronx teenage graffiti artist (played by Asante Blackk), who runs away from home and tries to rob an MTA worker (played by Luis Guzmán). The robbery doesn't go as planned, and the event changes the course of both of their lives. Torres and Blackk join to discuss their film, which is in select New York theaters now.
3/15/202417 minutes, 34 seconds
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Teyana Taylor Stars in NAACP Image Award-Nominated Film, 'A Thousand and One'

[REBROADCAST FROM April 14, 2023] A new drama, "A Thousand and One," stars Teyana Taylor as Inez, a young mother in New York City who kidnaps her 6-year-old son, Terry, from the foster care system. As Inez builds a home for her son, the two of them are confronted with the realities of gentrification in their community. Writer and director A.V. Rockwell, who was born and raised in Queens, joins us to talk about the film which is now playing in theaters.
3/15/202414 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ava DuVernay and Aunjanue Ellis-Taylor on NAACP Image Award-Nominated Film, 'Origin'

[REBROADCAST FROM January 19, 2024] Ava DuVernay wrote and directed the new film, "Origin," which has been called "one of a kind," "powerful" and "ambitious." The story is based around the life of Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson, played by Aunjanue Ellis-Taylor, and follows Wilkerson as she writes her book, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents. Published in 2020, the book argues for considering racism as an aspect of a caste system like those in India or Nazi Germany. DuVernay and Ellis-Taylor join us to discuss the film, which is in theaters now.
3/15/202420 minutes
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"Dune 2" Review

Denis Villenueve’s highly anticipated “Dune” sequel has finally arrived this week after months-long delays, and it’s already a critical triumph. Sean Fennessey and Amanda Dobbins co-hosts of The Big Picture podcast, join to break down what works about this sci-fi epic, which sees Paul Atreides begin to amass power and influence amongst the Fremen of Arrakis. *This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar  
3/14/202413 minutes, 50 seconds
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Managing Astronaut Mental Health in Space

Going into space can be a terrifying and isolating experience for astronauts. A new documentary focuses on the work of NASA psychologists who help astronauts cope with the mental health challenges of space exploration. Director Ido Mizrahy and astronaut Cady Coleman, one of the subjects of the film, join us to discuss, "Space: The Longest Goodbye," in theaters and video on demand on Friday.  *This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/14/202420 minutes, 59 seconds
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Dervish Celebrates 30 Years of Touring America with Traditional Irish Music

Dervish is a traditional Irish folk band from County Sligo, Ireland, that is in the midst of a nationwide tour celebrating the band's 30th anniversary of touring America. As we head into St. Patrick's Day weekend, band members Shane Mitchell and Cathy Jordan join to discuss the tour as well as the history of Irish traditional music and its connection to New York. Dervish play tonight in Fairfield, Connecticut, at 7:30pm. They’ll also be playing on Long Island in Riverhead on Sunday, March 19th in Old Saybrook, and Red Bank, NJ on March 20th.
3/14/202425 minutes, 52 seconds
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Better Cooking Through Science

A new book explores the science of food, and explains how concepts from chemistry, biology and psychology can help bring more flavor and flexibility into the kitchen. It's called "Flavorama: A Guide to Unlocking The Art and Science of Flavor." Arielle Johnson, flavor scientist and co-founder of Noma's 'fermentation lab' shares her insights from a lifetime of studying what makes things taste good.
3/14/202424 minutes, 58 seconds
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Tobias Menzies & James L. Swanson on 'Manhunt'

Actor Tobias Menzies is currently starring in two exciting projects. In the play "The Hunt," running at St. Ann's Warehouse through March 24th, he plays a teacher accused of child molestation. And in "Manhunt" on Apple TV +, he plays Edwin Stanton, the man in charge of the hunt for John Wilkes Booth in the aftermath of Lincoln's assassination. Menzies joins us to discuss these two projects, and later he will be joined by James L. Swanson, author of the book Manhunt: The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln's Killer.
3/14/202425 minutes, 9 seconds
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What the Deerfield Massacre Represents in US History

After discussing the new adaptation of his book Manhunt, author and historian James L. Swanson sticks around to talk about his new book, The Deerfield Massacre: A Surprise Attack, a Forced March, and the Fight for Survival in Early America. It's an examination of a moment of violence in colonial America and what it represented for the future relations between white colonists and indigenous Americans.
3/14/202425 minutes, 17 seconds
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A Celebrated Translator on Her Debut Novel About Translation

Celebrated translator Jennifer Croft is best known for translating the work of Nobel Prize winner Olga Tokarczuk into English. Now, she's written her first novel, a story centered on translation. When a famous Polish writer invites her group of personal translators to her home on the edge of a Polish forest, they believe that they are there to translate her new masterwork. But when the author goes missing, the translators must figure out where she has gone, and what she was working on. Jennifer Croft joins us to discuss The Extinction of Irena Rey. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/13/202426 minutes, 31 seconds
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New Film “One Life” Follows Kindertransport Organizer Nicholas Winton

The historical drama “One Life” stars Johnny Flynn and Anthony Hopkins as humanitarian Nicholas Winton at two points in his life: in 1938, leading a coordinated effort that succeeded in evacuating 669 Jewish children from Nazi-occupied Prague; and in 1988, reflecting on his efforts as the world becomes aware of them. Flynn and director James Hawes join us to discuss the film, which arrives in theaters nationwide this Friday. *This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/13/202420 minutes, 32 seconds
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Julio Torres Breathes Color Into 'Problemista'

In the film "Problemista" an aspiring toy designer named Alejandro must deal with an eccentric boss to maintain his work visa while living in New York City. Actor and comedian Julio Torres wrote, directed, and starred as the lead in the film which is in theaters now. He joins us to discuss. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar  
3/13/202423 minutes, 34 seconds
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Regina Spektor Revisited

We revisit a conversation with performer Regina Spektor from last summer, when she came to studio to perform music from her most recent album, "home, before and after."  *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/13/202428 minutes, 45 seconds
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Regina Spektor Revisited

We revisit a conversation with performer Regina Spektor from last summer, when she came to studio to perform music from her most recent album, "home, before and after."  *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/13/202428 minutes, 49 seconds
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New Film “One Life” Follows Kindertransport Organizer Nicholas Winton

The historical drama “One Life” stars Johnny Flynn and Anthony Hopkins as humanitarian Nicholas Winton at two points in his life: in 1938, leading a coordinated effort that succeeded in evacuating 669 Jewish children from Nazi-occupied Prague; and in 1988, reflecting on his efforts as the world becomes aware of them. Flynn and director James Hawes join us to discuss the film, which arrives in theaters nationwide this Friday. *This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/13/202420 minutes, 35 seconds
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A Celebrated Translator on Her Debut Novel About Translation

Celebrated translator Jennifer Croft is best known for translating the work of Nobel Prize winner Olga Tokarczuk into English. Now, she's written her first novel, a story centered on translation. When a famous Polish writer invites her group of personal translators to her home on the edge of a Polish forest, they believe that they are there to translate her new masterwork. But when the author goes missing, the translators must figure out where she has gone, and what she was working on. Jennifer Croft joins us to discuss The Extinction of Irena Rey. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/13/202426 minutes, 35 seconds
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Julio Torres Breathes Color Into 'Problemista'

In the film "Problemista" an aspiring toy designer named Alejandro must deal with an eccentric boss to maintain his work visa while living in New York City. Actor and comedian Julio Torres wrote, directed, and starred as the lead in the film which is in theaters now. He joins us to discuss. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar  
3/13/202423 minutes, 37 seconds
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A Candid New Film about legendary Comedian Gene Wilder

Born Jerome Silberman in Milwaukee, Gene Wilder became one of the most in demand and beloved comic actors of his generation.  A new film uses his own voice and never before seen footage to document his life story and pay tribute to the beloved artist. We speak to Ron Frank, director of "Remembering Gene Wilder," which opens this Friday at the Quad Cinema. *This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar  
3/12/202425 minutes, 4 seconds
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Last-Minute Tax Filing Tips

For most taxpayers, the deadline to file their personal federal tax return is about a month away! Finance expert Lynnette Khalfani-Cox, also known as "The Money Coach," joins us to discuss how to prepare for tax season and get your finances in order. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar  
3/12/202423 minutes, 21 seconds
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Tony Notarberardino's Chelsea Hotel Portraits

The Chelsea Hotel on West 23rd street has long been an iconic setting in New York, a place where artists of all kinds were known to live and work, like Mark Twain, Arthur Miller, Jimi Hendrix, and Patti Smith. Photographer Tony Notarberardinofirst moved into the hotel in 1994 and has never left. As a resident, he's shot portraits of the hotel's residents and workers, and has also witnessed the hotel's turbulent recent history. A new solo exhibition, Notarberardino's first gallery show, displays some of his portraits. Tony Notarberardino: Chelsea Hotel Portraits is on view through April 13.  *This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar  
3/12/202422 minutes, 50 seconds
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A Candid New Film about legendary Comedian Gene Wilder

Born Jerome Silberman in Milwaukee, Gene Wilder became one of the most in demand and beloved comic actors of his generation.  A new film uses his own voice and never before seen footage to document his life story and pay tribute to the beloved artist. We speak to Ron Frank, director of "Remembering Gene Wilder," which opens this Friday at the Quad Cinema. *This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar  
3/12/202425 minutes, 8 seconds
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Criterion's 'Razzie' Collection and Your Favorite Worst Movies

For the month of March, the Criterion Channel presents a collection called "And the Razzie Goes to..." featuring winners of Hollywood's highest dishonor, the Golden Raspberry. Despite their demerits, or because of them, history has given many of these films -- "Xanadu," "Heaven's Gate," and "Showgirls" among them -- cult followings and critical reevaluations. Criterion video editor Clyde Folley joins us to talk about the collection, and take listeners' calls about their own favorite worst movies. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar
3/12/202428 minutes, 1 second
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Last-Minute Tax Filing Tips

For most taxpayers, the deadline to file their personal federal tax return is about a month away! Finance expert Lynnette Khalfani-Cox, also known as "The Money Coach," joins us to discuss how to prepare for tax season and get your finances in order. *This segment is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar  
3/12/202423 minutes, 24 seconds
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Tony Notarberardino's Chelsea Hotel Portraits

The Chelsea Hotel on West 23rd street has long been an iconic setting in New York, a place where artists of all kinds were known to live and work, like Mark Twain, Arthur Miller, Jimi Hendrix, and Patti Smith. Photographer Tony Notarberardinofirst moved into the hotel in 1994 and has never left. As a resident, he's shot portraits of the hotel's residents and workers, and has also witnessed the hotel's turbulent recent history. A new solo exhibition, Notarberardino's first gallery show, displays some of his portraits. Tony Notarberardino: Chelsea Hotel Portraits is on view through April 13.  *This episode is guest-hosted by Kousha Navidar  
3/12/202422 minutes, 47 seconds