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African Dialogue

English, Chat, 1 season, 1456 episodes, 4 days, 20 hours, 34 minutes
About
The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
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Reparations of the Colonisation of Africa

The right to reparation is a well-established principle of international law. Reparation is a principle of law that has existed for centuries, referring to the obligation of a wrongdoing party to redress the damage caused to the injured party. Under international law, reparation must, as far as possible, wipe out all the consequences of the illegal act and re-establish the situation which would, in all probability, have existed if that act had not been committed. To help us deal with this complex issue we are joined on the line by:Mallett Giyose is chairman of Jubilee South Africa Zola Valashiya: Campaign Manager at Corruption Watch and Founder of Debate Africa
2/14/201744 minutes, 46 seconds
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Mining Challenges

The Mining Indaba took place last week in Cape Town and brought together mining experts from twenty five African countries to discuss good governance and sustainable practices in the sector. The key themes this year of the indaba were collaboration and inclusiveness. Despite the optimistic theme there main criticism was how mining doesn’t benefit African communities.To assist us on this subject we are joined by:• Ross Harvey, South African Institute of International Affairs• Thembinkosi Dlamini, OxfamSA • Rev Damon, Economic Justice Network,
2/13/201739 minutes, 24 seconds
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Mental health

A national uproar has been sparked in South Africa after at least 94 patients with mental health disabilities died after being moved by the government from mainstream hospitals to unlicensed health facilities. Last week the country’s health ombudsman released a report which detailed that the facilities that the patients were moved to were overcrowded and were selected in a “hurried implementation process”. This has brought questions around ethics in mental health. To assist us on this subject we are joined by: Aaron Motsoaledi, Minister of Health In South Africa, Dr Herman Raath, Specialist Clinical Psychologist at Windhoek, Namibia, Prof Keymantri Moodley Bio-Ethicist of Head: Centre of Medical ethics and law faculty at the University of Stellenbosch: School of medicine Dr Chris Verster, Psychiatrist and lecturer at University of Stellenbosch: School of Medicine.
2/9/201738 minutes, 22 seconds
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African Growth and Opportunity Act

Trade has been an essential part of the African markets. But materialisation and globalisation including opening local markets to the international markets is becoming a problem for most African countries. And there is the African Growth and Opportunity Act which was signed into law in the year 2000. The act offers tangible incentives of African countries to continue their efforts to open their economies and build free markets. With challenges facing the continent, how is Africa responding to industries becoming obsolete contributing to joblessness and inequality? To unpack the topic we are joined by:1. Cyril Prinsloo Researcher SAIIA Economic Diplomacy Programme2. Kholofelo Maponya Shareholder Day Break farms 3. Tinashe Kapuya Head: Industrial Trade and Investment Intelligence Agricultural Business Chambers
2/7/201739 minutes, 50 seconds
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African Union and it's future

The African Union Commission is under transition with the appointment of the newly elected chairman Moussa Faki Mahamat, Chad’s foreign minister. With the exit of the Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma the continental body will also replace its chair. The new African Union chair will be Guinean President Alpha Conde who replaces Chadian President Idris Debby. In this change the new African Union Commission head would have about three months to set up his cabinet.To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined by:• Prof. Kealeboga Maphunye political analyst • Nhlanhla Mahlangu, Channel Africa reporter
2/2/201735 minutes, 58 seconds
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Health Research

Three prominent Research and development Agencies, the African Academy of Sciences, the South African Medical Research Council, and the Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa in partnership with the New Partnership for Africa's Development, have formed an intra – African collaboration in an effort to fund, conduct and facilitate research projects in the area of maternal, neonatal and child health. To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by:• Zoleka Ngcete: Project Manager: South African Medical Research Council • Evelyn Gitau : Programme Manager: African Academy of Science
2/1/201734 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Gambia the Future

The departure of The Gambia’s former President Yahya Jammeh from Banjul 12 days ago, brings to an end a remarkable confrontation between the autocrat and other leaders of West Africa, the African Union, and the United Nations. It also offers important lessons for those seeking to advance the cause of democracy and the rule of law on the continent more generally. As a result, this is a victory for the people of The Gambia, the forces of democracy, and Adama Barrow, who defeated Jammeh in a December 1st national election.To discuss the challenges and opportunities for his new administration,, we are joined on the line by:• Jeggan- Grey Johnson: Communications and Advocacy officer with the Africa Governance, Monitoring and Advocacy Project • Fatou Jagne: West Africa Regional Director Of Human Rights Organisation called Article 19 based in Dakar
1/31/201739 minutes, 30 seconds
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Hate Crime and the Hate Speech Bill

In the introduction of the Hate Crimes Bill to the public, South African Justice Minister Michael Masutha explained that, “A hate crime is committed if a person commits any recognised offence that is a common law or statutory offence... and the commission of that offence is motivated by unlawful bias, prejudice or intolerance. The Bill goes further in criminalising hate speech, which it defines as the intentional communication or advocacy of hatred towards a person or group with the aim of inciting violence or harm. The communication of ‘contempt or ridicule’ over public online platforms is also outlined as a crime. Although the Bill claims to provide for the prevention of hate crimes and hate speech, as well as reporting on the implementation, its application and administration as an integrated approach from government is unclear.To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by:• Tshego Phala Lawyer at Webber Wentzel • Jabulani Chen-Perriera CEO of Iranti-Org• Giet khoza Pastor/CEO RHEMA Bible Church
1/30/201735 minutes, 18 seconds
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Social media platforms

Intro: The search engine Google released a report yesterday stating that they have cracked down on over three hundred websites last year and two hundred of those are no longer allowed to use Google ads. This comes after social media platforms such as Facebook received negative criticism of failing to minimize false news stories during last year’s US presidential election last year. The biggest fake news scandal making headlines on the continent is over allegations that the ANC conducted a covert operation aimed at discrediting opposition parties ahead of the 2016 Local Government Election. To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by:• Anim Van Wyk, editor at Africa Check.• Dr Musawenkosi Ndlovu, senior lecturer of media studies at the University of Cape Town • Yavi Mudarai, social media trends expert
1/26/201757 minutes, 43 seconds
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Kariba Dam Reconstruction

Urgent repairs to avert the collapse of the gigantic, power-generating Kariba Dam between Zimbabwe and Zambia will begin this year after the two neighbours signed 294 Million dollars in deals with international investors on Friday. The overhaul project of the world's largest man-made dam will fix deformities and cracks in walls that were discovered in a series of assessments. Those threaten to cause the massive structure to collapse. an eventuality that would carry unimaginable humanitarian and environmental consequences if water in the 181 billion cubic metre capacity reservoir were freed by a massive breach. To chat to us about this massive project, we are joined on the line byChris Harold: Vice President of the South African Institute of Civil EngineeringSputnik Ratau: South Africa’s Water Affairs and Sanitation Spokesperson
1/25/20171 hour, 7 seconds
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African Union Summit Preview

African leaders will next week meet to chart the continent's development agenda, including the appointment of a new leadership team for the African Union Secretariat, based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The 28th Ordinary Assembly of the AU Heads of State and Government is set for 30 to 31 January in Addis Ababa. According to the draft agenda, one of the key issues for discussion is the appointment of a new leadership at the AU Commission to steer deeper integration in Africa. More from Liesl Louw-Vaudran, Africa analyst and consultant at the Institute for Security Studies…To help us on looking at the year ahead: • Jeggan- Grey Johnson: Communications and Advocacy officer with the Africa Governance, Monitoring and Advocacy Project)• Professor Shadrack Gutto, political analyst
1/24/201759 minutes, 41 seconds
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President Donald Trump and Africa

Property mogul and multimillionaire Donald Trump has officially taken the residence in the White House. The world watched in anticipation as Trump became the 45th President of the United States. Trump's swearing-in ceremony was attended by ex-Presidents, prominent politicians and Trump's family. In a highly nationalistic inauguration speech, he warned that American wealth had been “ripped from homes and redistributed across the world” and that now was the time to put "America first". But not all shared his happy moment as thousands of people took part in anti-Trump protests in Washington DC and across America. In the capital, protesters clashed with police, set a limousine on fire and damaged property. To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by:1. Chelsea Markowitz, Visiting Researcher at the Institute of international relations 2. Tom Wheeler Former Ambassador to Washington
1/23/201756 minutes, 45 seconds
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Angolan Refugee Document

According to the South African Department of Home Affairs, Angolan refugees have until the 20th January 2017 to apply for permanent residence or be deported back to their home country. This comes after a court order made by the Western Cape High Court after a lengthy litigation process dating back to 2013 when the Department of Home Affairs announced it was revoking refugee statuses as Angola was now no longer a war zone. The department said the circumstances that recognised Angolans as refugees no longer existed; therefore, SA no longer had an obligation to protect them. As of that they automatically became, the Angolan refugees were given two years to work and study in SA while preparing to go back home. When their cessation permits were no longer valid they automatically became illegal immigrantTo help us talk more about this we are joined on the line by:1. Leon Issacson Managing Director Global Migration 2. Pieter Britz Managing Director Forum of Immigration Practitioners of South Africa (FIPSA)3. Manuel Panzo: President of the Congress of Students in the Angolan Refugee Community in South Africa
1/19/201757 minutes, 52 seconds
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World Economic Conference

A record 3 thousand leaders from government, business and civil society are set to gather for the 47th World Economic Forum in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland. They attending a meeting that seeks to address critical leadership challenges. Under the theme "Responsive and Responsible Leadership", the meeting will focus on four leadership challenges for 2017 – re-imagining global cooperation, revitalising the global economy, reforming capitalism and preparing for the Fourth Industrial Revolution. To look at this gathering we are now joined on the line by?Atul Padalkar: From a company called BizFarm (We Grow Entrepreneurs) Morafe Tabane: SABC Economics Reporter: Ayabonga Cawe: An Economic Justice Programme Manager at Oxfam:
1/18/201756 minutes
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Education in South African Schools

South Africa's minister of education openly admitted that the country's schools are in a state of crisis. She says if 25% of students she will have sleepless nights. Statistics say some 213,000 children failed their end of school examination for the academic year ending last month, out of a total of nearly 800,000. Furthermore According to Stellenbosch University's Professor Servaas van der Berg says out of the 1.2 million seven-year-olds who enrolled in Grade 1 in 2002; slightly less than half went on to pass their school-leaving exam, the matric, 11 years later. Now in the recent past there has been a lot of challenges where about 17 000 learners had not been place in schools for the beginning of the academic year.To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by:1. Mungwena Maluleke SADTU Secretary General 2. Prof Karin Brodie Wits School of Education Head of School
1/16/201755 minutes, 29 seconds
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President Obama's Farewell

After 8 years of his presidency as the first African American president of the United States, Barak Obama ended his leadership with an urgent and fearful warning about the state of American democracy. In his final speech to the American people Obama gave what many feel was a thinly veiled slight to the divisive rhetoric of Donald Trump's election campaign, which included attacks on Muslims, the disabled, women and immigrants. Brushing away tears with a handkerchief, Obama paid tribute to the sacrifices made by his wife, and by his daughters, who were young girls when they entered the big white home on Pennsylvania Avenue and leave as young women. To chat to us about what his legacy will be, we are joined on the line by:CHELSEA MARKOWITZ: A researcher with the Institute of International Relations: PROF JOHN STEAMLAU: Wits International Relations Faculty: TOM WHEELER: Former South African Ambassador to Washington, The United States:
1/12/201759 minutes, 33 seconds
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Gambia Election update

The presidents of Nigeria, Sierra Leone and Liberia were scheduled to visit Gambian President Yahya Jammeh today in a second attempt to press him to hand over power, but that has been postponed to Friday. Jammeh, in power since a 1994 coup, lost a December first 2016 election to businessman Adama Barrow, but the authoritarian leader has contested the results in a move condemned at home and abroad. An ECOWAS delegation led by Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf visited Gambia in December but failed to persuade Jammeh to step down. The West African bloc has since said it would take all necessary steps to uphold the result of the election and had put troops on standby. To help us understand what’ going on in the Gambia we are joined on the line by: Jeggan- Grey Johnson: Communications and Advocacy officer with the Africa Governance, Monitoring and Advocacy Project which is supported by the Africa Foundations of the Open Society Foundations. Brian T. Neubert: Director of the United States Department of Regional Media Hub here in Johannesburg Peter Nkanga: Committee to Protect Journalists from West Africa Representative
1/11/201759 minutes, 52 seconds
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African Tourism over the Festive

South African tourism has improved tremendously over the last year with a 26.6 percent increase in tourism revenue as it becomes attractive for European travelers looking for high tides and sunny escapes from an otherwise wintery home. The sunny weather has not only become appealing for European tourists but also for Indians wanting to experience everything South African tourism has to offer. Official data from South African Tourism Board shows South Africans enjoy their local tourism with a figure of 570,944, followed by Europe with a total of visitors from Austria, Greece, Switzerland and others with 105,035. This further proves Africa is still a destination of choice for many.To help us talk more about this we are joined on the line by:1. Sisa Ntshona CEOTourism South Africa2. Kwakye Donkor Director: Marketing and Communication RETOSA
1/10/201757 minutes, 41 seconds
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105th Anniversary of the African National Congress

The African National Congress, South Africa’s ruling party celebrated its one hundred and fifth birthday in Johannesburg yesterday. The celebration was in a form of the January Statement, delivered by the president of the ANC, President Jacob Zima, wherein the party does a self-introspection. Yesterday’s celebrations were held at the iconic Orlando Stadium, which was built in 1959, but then demolished to make way for a new stadium at the cost of 280 million rand. According to the ANC Head of Organisation for the celebrations, Fikile Mbalula the January 8 Statement is about what they need to do to renew their vows to the people of South Africa. To discuss what transpired yesterday, we are joined on the line by:Professor Suzan Booysen: Wits University School of Governance Professor: Dr Theo Venter: University of the North West: Zakhele Ndlovu: Politics Lecturer: Kwa-Zulu Natal University:
1/9/201756 minutes, 46 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
12/29/201659 minutes, 5 seconds
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A sneak peek of 2017

The year 2016 marked the culmination of a decline of liberation politics in South Africa. But not only was South Africa on the spotlight, but the rest of the African continent has a share fare of the good and the bad. In South Africa Liberal politics of petty bourgeois class contestation over political power and control of economic resources assumed the centre stage. The fight over the control of the National Treasury; squabbles over “state capture”; and the serialised motions of no-confidence in President Jacob Zuma to resign as president are some of the hallmarks that manifest the consolidation of liberal democracy. In Africa South Sudan became number one in the list of countries that had a fair share of turbulence and uncertainty, then came political upheavals in the Gambia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.To help us on looking at the year ahead: • Izak Khomo, senior reporter at Channel Africa • Charlie Khumalo, executive producer for Portuguese service • Sophie Mokoema, acting political editor at SABC radio news
12/22/201659 minutes, 48 seconds
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A look back at 2016

The year 2016 was a busy year for news. The year was filled by events from drought to Ebola, from elections to many country leaders trying to retain power. Countries like Syria, South Sudan and Libya made the headlines as was the massive migration problem for Europe. Britain said goodbye to the European Union while South Africa and other countries said goodbye to the International Criminal Court and one of the major stories was the amazing Presidential win in the United States by Donald Trump. In this edition of African Dialogue we take a look back at some of these stories that we covered:
12/21/201656 minutes, 53 seconds
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RSA - Lesotho Special Permits

The Director General of the South African Department of Home Affairs Mkhuseli Apleni has met with his Lesotho counterpart Borenahabokhete Sekonyela in a bid to rally Lesotho nationals living in South African to apply for the Lesotho Special Permits. In their deliberations they mentioned that all Lesotho nationals living in South Africa illegally have until the 31 December 2016 to pay for the Lesotho Special Permit or face deportation. Application centres have opened up at six Lesotho border posts to receive the applications. Applications made this year will be received and the supporting documents can be submitted in the year 2017 by the end of March.To further explain the significance of this initiative we are joined on the line by:1. Richard Stoltz Chief Director South African Department of Home Affairs 2. Tumelo Raboletsi Director Lesotho Department of Home Affairs3. Jiten Vyas Chief Operations Officer VFS Global
12/20/201656 minutes, 6 seconds
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AFRICAN TAX INVASION

Africa is losing more than 50 billion every year in illicit financial outflows as governments and multinational companies engage in fraudulent schemes aimed at avoiding tax payments to some of the world’s poorest countries, impeding development projects and denying poor people access to crucial services. According to a report released by the African Union’s high-level panel on illicit financial flows and the United Nations economic commission for Africa Illegal transfers from African countries have tripled since 2001, when20 billion dollars was siphoned off. The report was praised by civil society groups as the first African initiative to address illicit outflows from the continent. To help us discuss this matter, we are joined by:Kathy Nicolaou: Management and Public sector consultant, Advisor, Part-time lecturer, Illicit financial flows expert for SA and Africa. Dawie Roodt: Director and Chief Economist of Efficient Group Keith Engel: Chief Executive Officer: The SA Institute of Tax Professionals
12/19/201656 minutes, 58 seconds
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Gambia after elections

Gambia's ruling party, the Alliance for Patriotic Reorientation and Construction says the current head of state Yahya Jammeh is to contest in court, the election victory handed to opposition candidate Adama Barrow. In a shock rejection of his defeat at the polls, Jammeh cited in a speech broadcast late Friday last week in which he mentioned "unacceptable errors" by election authorities. He was referring to a readjustment of the votes counted in the December 1 presidential election. Jammeh's swift concession of defeat on December 2 had stunned observers and led to celebrations in the country. To help us unpack this we are joined by:Ephraim Khumalo: Channel Africa’s Portuguese Service Executive Producer Jeggan- Grey Johnson: Communications and Advocacy officer with the Africa Governance, Monitoring and Advocacy Project which is supported by the Africa Foundations of the Open Society Foundations. Ousman Yabo: Executive Director of The Association of Non-Governmental organisation (TANGO) in Gambia
12/14/201656 minutes, 15 seconds
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Reconciliation in South Africa and beyond

It's been 22 years since the birth of democracy but South Africa is still struggling to reconcile the injustices of the past. This year, the country experienced several racist outbursts on social media, fuelling tensions and causing people to question if enough has been done to address racial issues.• Dr Marjorie Jobson: National Director: Khulekani Support Group, Khulumani Support Group in South Africa transforming Apartheid victims into active citizens through truth and memory healing, reparations, and reconciliation• Stan Henkeman, Executive Director for the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation.
12/13/201655 minutes, 50 seconds
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Mkhaya Awards

The South African Department of Home Affairs launched the Mkhaya Migrants Awards in 2015 to promote the building of a united, democratic and prosperous society where citizens, residents and migrants live together in peace and harmony. The awards are an enabler of tolerance, social cohesion and integration. They are a cultural expression of the national resolve to create communities wherein citizens and migrants work together for peace and friendship. Some of the categories include Sports, Arts and Culture, Business, Civil Society/NGO, OR Tambo and Most Integrated Community. To tell us more we have:1. Morakabe “RAKS” Seakhoa, Managing Director Writer Associate2. Braam Hanekom Adjudicator Mkhaya Awards 3. Siphiwe Segodi: Winner of the Most Integrated Community
12/12/201655 minutes, 49 seconds
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The 16 Days of non-violence against women and children

The 16 Days of non-violence against women and children has in most cases only solicited comment around the challenges women are facing and pushing the plight of children in the backburner. In most societies as we observe the 16 days of non-violence against women and children, family units having been broken down, and children are left with one or no parents. In most cases, poverty on families has seen an increase in drug and alcohol use. This directly affects children with regards to physical and sexual abuse. Parents who are struggling, who have been abused themselves, or those who are simply trying to express their anger take it out on their children. To help us discuss the challenges children are facing as we observe the 16 days of Activism, we are now joined on the line by:Dr. Celia Hsiao (Save the Children South Africa Research Manager) Sinah Moruane, UNICEF SOUTH AFRICA child protection specialistDr Shaheda Omar, director of clinical services at the Teddy Bear Clinic Lynne Caywood, the director of childline Gauteng
12/6/201659 minutes, 33 seconds
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Nelson Mandela Legacy

INTRO: South Africans are reflecting on the death of former President Nelson Mandela who died on the 5th of December in 2013. Mandela had undergone treatment for a recurring lung infection at a heart hospital in Pretoria. Local and international media camped outside the hospital until the very last day. Mandela's body lay in state at the Union Buildings for three days giving citizens an opportunity to pay their last respects. To look at Mandela’s legacy we spoke to: • Tlou Theophilus Cholo, an anti-apartheid veteran. • Sello Hatang, CEO of the Nelson Mandela Foundation. • Vuyo Lutseke, media and communication officer at the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital Trust.
12/5/201659 minutes, 26 seconds
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Nelson Mandela Legacy

South Africans are reflecting on the death of former President Nelson Mandela who died on the 5th of December in 2013. Mandela had undergone treatment for a recurring lung infection at a heart hospital in Pretoria. Local and international media camped outside the hospital until the very last day. Mandela's body lay in state at the Union Buildings for three days giving citizens an opportunity to pay their last respects. To look at Mandela’s legacy we spoke to: • Tlou Theophilus Cholo, an anti-apartheid veteran. • Sello Hatang, CEO of the Nelson Mandela Foundation. • Vuyo Lutseke, media and communication officer at the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital Trust.
12/5/201659 minutes, 26 seconds
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Festive Spending

December is the season of big spending by consumers, usually because of the festive season. Christmas and New Year’s Eve compel consumers to spend extra for entertainment and leisure activities during this period. Consumers are drawn by the bling advertising and the retail stores specials to overspend on luxuries in the season. To speak on this we are joined by: • Prof. Carel Van Aardt, the head of the Household Wealth Research Division, at the Bureau of Market Research • Nathan Desfontaines, Cyber Security Manager at KPMG • Rose Molokoane, board member at the Savings Institute• Lebogang Mototo, associate institute at the Wits Business School
12/1/201657 minutes, 13 seconds
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Water Management

Following the successful outcomes of the 1st Regional Meeting on Tools for the Sustainable Management of Transboundary Aquifers held in July 2015, this meeting is the second in a row of regional meetings on transboundary aquifers in the Southern Africa region. It addresses contemporary issues related to the management of transboundary aquifers in the region, with particular focus on the Stampriet and the Ramotswa transboundary aquifers, shared between, Botswana, Namibia and South Africa; and Botswana and South Africa, respectively. Both projects related to these aquifers (led by UNESCO-IHP and IWMI, respectively) are moving into the second phase, and this meeting will take stock of progress and next steps. It will also provide essential training related to legal and institutional tools and approaches to management of transboundary aquifers.To help us link up:• Dr Karen Villholth - Sub-Theme Leader and Principal Researcher, Groundwater and Underground Solutions, at the International Water Management Institute• Mr Phera Ramoeli - Senior Programme Officer (Water Sector) in the Directorate of Infrastructure and Services – SADC Secretariat
11/30/201659 minutes, 29 seconds
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The History of Liberation Movements in Southern Africa

For many African countries, constituting democracy appears to be an elusive process. Several liberation movements that valiantly opposed colonial powers in the name of freedom and democracy have been markedly undemocratic when in power. Political Analyst William Gumede argues that at the heart of this, lies a failure to establish a democratic political culture, with several governments and leaders viewing democracy in its most limited sense of hosting elections. To help us understand why liberation movements in Southern Africa have failed to live to expectations, we are joined by:Josh Mhambi: Former Zimbabwe African People's Union member in Zimbabwe: (STUDIO GUEST)Roger Southall: Professor Emeritus in Sociology at the University of the WitwatersrandOmar Badcha: Chief Executive of the South Africa History on line
11/29/20161 hour, 40 seconds
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16 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children

The 16 Days of Activism for No Violence against Women and Children is an international awareness-raising campaign. It takes place every year from 25 November to 10 December. The period includes Universal Children’s Day and World AIDS Day. South Africa adopted the campaign in 1998 as one of the intervention strategies towards creating a society free of violence. The campaign continues to raise awareness amongst South Africans about the negative impact of violence against women and children on all members of the community.To help us talk more about this campaign we are joined on the line…1. Patrick Solomons Director Molosongololo2. Alta McMaster Survivor (RAPE)
11/28/201656 minutes, 56 seconds
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HIV vaccine

South Africa is currently trialling the new HIV vaccine over the period of four years on adults between the ages of 18-35. This early-stage HIV vaccine clinical trial in South Africa has determined that an investigational vaccine regimen is safe and generates comparable immune responses to those reported in a landmark 2009 study showing that a vaccine can protect people from HIV infection. This new study, called HVTN 702, is designed to determine whether the regimen is safe, tolerable and effective at preventing HIV infection among South African adults. All study participants will receive a total of five injections over one year. The volunteers will be randomly assigned to receive either the investigational vaccine regimen or a placebo. To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by:1. Prof Glenda Gray President South African Medical Research Council 2. Prof Lynn Morris Head AIDS Research National Institute of Communicable Diseases
11/24/201659 minutes, 57 seconds
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Syrian Civil War

Analysts are saying the only real solution to Syria’s humanitarian catastrophe is an end to the conflict. Unfortunately, that end looks a long way off. The fighting inside Syria continues to erupt and shift, and despite continued attempts at peace, including talks in Moscow and a ceasefire proposal for Aleppo, the warring parties, and the countries with influence to stop them, remain divided. Most analysts are saying if left unchecked, the war may result into a regional struggle. Syria has been in the grip of war since 2011. In the political arena, opposition groups are also deeply divided, with rival alliances battling for supremacy. The most prominent is the National Coalition for Syrian Revolutionary and Opposition Forces, backed by several Western and Gulf Arab states. To help us understand and unpack this, we are now joined on the line by:• Prof Fanie Vermaak: Lecturer, Department of Ancient Near Eastern Culture at UNISA • Na’eem Jeenah: Executive Director of the Afro-Middle East Centre • Tom Wheeler: Former Ambassador/ former Research Associate at the South African Institute of International Affairs
11/23/20161 hour, 2 seconds
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Minimum Wage

There are concerns that the national minimum wage of three-thousand 500 rand a month proposed by Nedlac is too low. It's about a thousand rand less than what labour initially demanded. Parties are now taking the proposal to their constituencies for consideration. The ANC has welcomed the proposal, but called for further engagement between stakeholders. Business chamber Nafcoc say the minimum wage alone is not enough to combat poverty and inequality. To help us navigate this subject:• Terry Bell labour analyst • Free Market Foundation economist and director Jasson Urbach • FEDUSA General Secretary Dennis George
11/22/201656 minutes, 2 seconds
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South African Constitution

One of the most exceptional moments in South Africa’s history was the adoption of the South African Constitution on 8 May 1996, the occasion on which former President Thabo Mbeki delivered his iconic “I am an African” speech. The document that came as a result of two years of public participation, intense negotiations and significant head butting between political parties remains the foundation on which our democracy rests. Today as we celebrate the 21st anniversary of the South Africa Constitution, we are asking: – Is the SA Constitution an obstacle or a catalyst to Nation Building and Social Cohesion.Professor Sabelo Ndlovu- Professor and Head of the Archie Mafeje Research Institute at the University of South Africa Prof Dirk Kotzé, Political AnalystStacy Foster: Lecturer in Humanities at Witwatersrand
11/21/201656 minutes, 34 seconds
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RETOSA

The Regional Tourism Organization of Southern Africa is hosting its 1st Annual Southern Africa Sustainable Tourism Development Forum Conference in Johannesburg, South Africa. The two day conference,which starts today, aims to share sustainable tourism knowledge and best practices used by its Member States and other stakeholders in the tourism industry. To help us discuss some of the topics covered by the event, we have:Simba Mandinyenya – Acting Executive Director of the Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa (RETOSA)Cecilia Kinutia-Njenga – Head of the United Nations Environmental Programme Office in South Africa (UNEP)Caroline Ungerbock - CEO of the Sustainable Tourism Partnership ProgrammeRonald Verwerk – Marketing Manager at Boundless Southern Africa
11/16/201656 minutes, 42 seconds
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Lesotho Analysis

The Kingdom of Lesotho is once again under the spotlight, this after a faction in the National Executive Committee of the Prime Minister Pakalitha Mosisili’s party the Democratic Congress, announced it would be withdrawing from the country’s coalition government. The party has been riddled with factionalism for months with the Deputy Leader Monyane Moleleki allegedly forming coalitions with the opposition parties. At the peak of the faction’s reasons for the withdrawal, they accuse the coalition government of failing to uphold the rule of law. This happens after SADC Facilitator and South African Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa had a meeting with the country’s opposition leaders over the ongoing peace and stability efforts. To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by:1. Prof Frances Makoa Retired politics Lecturer University of Lesotho 2. Dr Ina Gouws Senior Lecturer Political Studies and Governance University of Free State 3. Nthakoana Ngatene SABC Correspondent4. Kwezi Mngqibisa Political Analyst
11/15/201657 minutes, 20 seconds
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Conference of the Parties commonly known as COP22

The twenty-second session of the Conference of the Parties commonly known as COP22 is currently underway Marrakech, Morocco. Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol, meet once a year at high level to discuss how to advance international action to combat climate change. Last year, 195 countries adopted the Paris Agreement on climate change, the world's first universal, legally binding climate deal. The conference in Marrakesh, aims to demonstrate that commitments made in Paris are being implemented, and to act as a catalyst for further action. To help us unpack this, we are joined on the line by: Ms Dominique Doyle who is the Project Coordinator at Earthlife Africa (JHB)Nokuthula Mhene: Food for Life Manager at Climate and Energy AT Green Peace Africa.
11/14/201655 minutes, 3 seconds
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Disability Month

November is Disability Month in South Africa, but should be a continental event. Channel Africa joined with other organisations and companies in making a difference. 32 children from the Tumelo Home for the mentally and Physically disabled children in Ivory Park east of Johannesburg, South Africa were surprised to see donations of toys, non perishable foods, disposable nappies and toiletries when they arrived . Channel Africa was there and in a broadcast from the home and spoke to :Dr Moses Thindisa – Founder of the Tumelo Home.Kaiser Kganyago – Spokesperson for the South African Broadcasting OrganisationGodfrey Mphatswe – a Mister South Africa of the Year Finalist, and now with the SABCSello Ramakwela – A Caregiver at the HomeFeroza Moosa – from one of the sponsors Premier HotelsMashabela Galane – A Comedian
11/10/201655 minutes, 51 seconds
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US Elections

Donald Trump is the new American president. He becomes the 45th president of the United States of America, following a bruising, divisive and most robust American election ever. Yet Trump is so far performing better than expected in the US presidential contest. As votes were counted across the United States, the Republican candidate won Ohio, Florida and North Carolina. Trump and his Democrat rival, Hilary Clinton, competing neck and neck to hit 270 electoral votes,Trump ended up wing nearly 290 electoral votes. Reactions have been widespread, To help us analyse what happened, we Chelsea Markowitz who is now Researcher of the Economic Diplomacy Programme at the South African Institute of International Affairs:Professor John Stremlau from the Department International Relations at Wits University in South Africa,
11/9/201655 minutes, 33 seconds
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Gambian Elections

Gambians are going to the polls in December this year to vote for a president for the fifth time since current leader Yahya Jammeh came to power in a 1994 coup. Over the past 22 years, President Jammeh and the Gambian security forces have used enforced disappearances, torture, intimidation, and arbitrary arrests to suppress dissent and preserve Jammeh’s grip on power. Ahead of this year’s election, the government has repeated these tactics, with a crackdown on opposition parties, particularly the United Democratic Party (UDP), that has all but extinguished hopes for a free and fair election. To help us unpack this we are now joined in studio and on the line by:• Charles Khumalo: Channel Africa Portuguese Service Executive Producer: • Jim Wormington, West Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch. Jeggan- Grey Johnson: Communications and Advocacy officer with the Africa Governance, Monitoring and Advocacy Project at the Africa Foundations of the Open Society Foundations.
11/7/201656 minutes, 43 seconds
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Youth and STG's

With the world’s population aged under the age of 30 years, there is no doubt that youth participation is central to policymaking and engage in social development issues. Central to the United Nation’s sustainable development goals is the question, what is the responsibility of the youth population in executing the ambitious global goals. To assist us on this subject we have in our studios: • Zola Valashiya Youth Co-ordinator Corruption Watch • Kenneth Diole South Africa Institute for International Affair’s Youth Programme Intern
11/2/201659 minutes, 2 seconds
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Ivory Coast Referendum

Ivory Coast President Alassane Ouattara has taken a step toward drawing up a new constitution and scrapping a nationality clause which helped drag his West African nation into a decade-long crisis and bedevilled his own initial bids for the presidency. The presidential office, in a statement late on Tuesday, announced the appointment of a 10-member experts panel, including Justice Minister Sansan Kambile along with legal experts and law professors, to draft a new national charter. The new constitution went to a public referendum for approval on Sunday. The Ivorian president pledged during his campaign for re-election last year, to scrap a nationality clause. To help us unpack this we are now joined on the line by:.Dr David Zoummneou; Senior Reseaeher: Institute of Security Studies Dr Richard Iroanya: Thabo Mbeki Africa Leadership Institute
11/1/20161 hour, 5 minutes, 47 seconds
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DTT Migration

Last week Friday the switch off from the Analogue to digital broadcasting in South Africa. However, the roll out was not in the entire country, this was only first phase of South Africa’s transition towards digital terrestrial television (DTT)in the Northern Cape area. Residents living in the SKA community of Keimoes and Kai Garib in Northern Cape were the first people in South Africa to experience DTT in the country. However, despite the fact that South Africa didn’t make the 2015 deadline there are still challenges, amongst others, such as the tender process by which set-top boxes or decoders to handed out by government to households. To look at the subject, we spoke to Tshidiso Reditabo, from SABC’S technology department.
10/31/201659 minutes, 53 seconds
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South Africa leaving the International Criminal Court (ICC)

African countries have debated in the last few years the mandate and role of the International Criminal Years, to a point now we are seeing them formally announcing their intention to withdraw from the international judicial body. South Africa announced last week Friday has started a reversal process of being a member of the International Criminal Court. Joining South Africa has been Burundi and Gambia announcing their intention to withdraw from the ICC. Kenya, Namibia and Uganda are among the countries that have indicated interest in leaving. Are we starting to see the erosion of the International Criminal Court? To assist us we are joined by: • Prof Magnus Killander, Head of Research: Centre for Human Rights of the University of Pretoria • Angela Mudukuti, Southern Africa Litigation Centre, • Ottilia Anna Maunganidze, Programme Head (Acting) & Senior Researcher in the Office of the Executive Director at the Institute for Security Studies.
10/28/201659 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ethiopia

A six-month state of emergency declared by the government of Ethiopia following months of violent anti-government protests is in full swing. The declaration marks a further hardening of the government's position after months of protests in different parts of Ethiopia. The country is facing its biggest anti-government unrest in a decade, from the majority Oromo and Amhara ethnic groups which feel marginalised by a minority-led government. To help us dissect this we are joined on the line by:• Izak Kgomo: Channel Africa Programme Producer• • Muthoni Wanyeki, Amnesty International's Regional Director for East Africa, the Horn and the Great Lakes, By phone, her direct line at work is
10/26/201656 minutes, 31 seconds
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African Editors and Press Officers Meeting

INTRO: The African Union Commission Chair Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma yesterday met with African editors, journalists and press officers in effort to strengthen relations between the African Union and the media. At the helm of her talk she encouraged the media to popularise the AU’s agenda 2063. Themed “The Africa We Want” the meeting also aimed to explore other media related projects such as the AU/African Broadcaster and to identify roles to be played by media and progressive Pan-African media workers.To further unpack how the meeting went we are joined by: 1. Mahlatse Gallens South African National Editors Forum Chairperson 2. Jovial Rantau African Editors Forum Chairperson
10/25/201654 minutes, 48 seconds
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United Nations’ Day

Today marks the United Nations’ Day which is the anniversary of the entry into force in 1945 of the UN Charter. With the ratification of this founding document by the majority of its signatories, including the five permanent members of the Security Council, the United Nations officially came into being. This day has been celebrated as United Nations Day since 1948. In 1971, the United Nations General Assembly recommended that the day be observed by Member States as a public holiday. To help us look into this, we are now joined on the line by: • Kenneth Diole: The Youth Programme at the South African Institute for International Affairs (SAIIA) • Sanusha Naidu: Senior Research Associate Institute for Global Dialogue
10/24/201655 minutes, 52 seconds
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Trans Kalahari Corridor

In the lead-up to the festive season , the governments of South Africa, Botswana and Namibia have embarked on a joint traffic law enforcement operation. Situated at the Trans-Kalahari Corridor, which connects the three countries, traffic inspectors and officials have partnered up in a large scale road block operation. The event is aimed at enhancing security enforcement and thus improving use of the corridor for lawful use. To Tell us more about this we have Cedric Mwanota Limbo, Director of Transport in NamibianKatlholo Gabriel Mosimanegape Director of Traffic for BotswanaMathabatha Mokonyama, Acting Direct or General of South Africa’s Department of Transport
10/20/201657 minutes, 40 seconds
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8th BRICS Summit

The 8th BRICS Summit is currently underway in India under the theme "Building Responsive, Inclusive and Collective Solutions". The member countries are deliberating on intra-BRICS Cooperation and on global issues such as international conflicts, the fight against terrorism, and reform of global system of governance, notably the democratisation of the United Nations and the Bretton Woods Institutions. The role of developing countries in leading efforts to bolster global growth has come under sharp focus during the summit. Amongst other issues that are being discussed are, global terrorism and climate change. 1. Tom Wheeler Researcher South African Institute of International Affairs2. Dr Peter Karungu Economist 3. Cyril Prinsloo Researcher SAIIA
10/18/201656 minutes, 52 seconds
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30 years of Samora Machel's Passing

Samora Machel, and 33 members of his delegation, died on 19 October 1986, when the plane that was carrying them back to Maputo from a summit in Zambia crashed on a hillside at Mbuzini, just inside South African territory. Investigations showed that the plane was not following the correct flight path, and there have always been strong suspicions that the apartheid regime used a false navigation beacon to lure the plane away from its correct path. In 1994, after the democratically-elected government took over, an investigation by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, TRC found inconclusive evidence pointing to the apartheid government's involvement in the crash.The Mozambican authorities have never closed the investigation into the cause of the crash. A South African Board of Inquiry set up in 1987 under Judge Cecil Margo proclaimed the crash an accident and blamed the Soviet crew on board. It concluded that the plane had received an incorrect radio link which misdirected it off Maputo..To help us look at the day indepth we have Acting Director General of South Africa Arts and Culture Department Acting Director-General , Mr Vusithemba Ndima •South African Journalist Mandla KhosaUri Porta – a Journalist from Radio Mozambique Channel African Executive Producer – Charlie Khumalo who was working in Mozambique at the time of the crash
10/17/201658 minutes, 27 seconds
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#Datamustfall

Former MetroFM DJ and current Touch Central star – Tbo Touch – went to Parliament on Tuesday with Gareth Cliff to present his #Datamustfall campaign to the communications department. He spoke about how the Maslow Hierarchy of needs has changed to put communication at the top; hence the need for the campaign which aims to lessen data costs for South Africans. A research conducted by the IRR last year revealed that South Africans are paying a lot of money for slow connection speeds. In 2015 the broadband download speed in South Africa was 7.0 megabits per second (Mbps). To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by:1. Rubben Mohlaloga Acting Chairperson Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA)2. Toby Shapshak Editor of Stuff Magazine in South Africa
10/13/201655 minutes, 55 seconds
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Migration from Africa to Europe

It was reported last week that more than 11,000 migrants have been rescued in the Mediterranean by aid groups and the Italian Coast Guard. The head of the International Organisation of Migration, William Lacy Swing, confirmed that there were up to three thousand and five hundred migrant deaths in the Mediterranean, just this year. Swing said that Europe needed to start looking at the situation differently if it wanted to see change. To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by:• Itayi Viriri, spokesperson of the International Organisation for Migration (IOM).• Craig Smith, Specialist Immigration Practitioner • Leon Isaacson, managing director of Global Migration,
10/12/201659 minutes, 57 seconds
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#Freefees

The streets of Braamfontein in Johannesburg were a no go area as Wits students took to the streets in protest for free education. A bus was torched and property vandalised. South African Higher Education and Training Minister Blade Ndzimande expressed his concern over the clashes between students and the police. Meanwhile in other universities around the country there has been violence and protests reported. University of Pretoria has since suspended its academic operations. In the university of Stellenbosch police clashed with students the resulted in around six students being detained. To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined by:1. Selby Xinwa{STUDIO}Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation Researcher 2. Sibusiso Thwala South African Union of Students Spokesperson
10/11/201656 minutes, 38 seconds
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Mo Ibrahim Index

Governance on the continent has marginally improved on the continent, in the past ten years. This is according to the 2016 Mo Ibrahim Index of African Countries. Leading the pack are Liberia and Ivory Coast as the most improved. There are a few surprises on the top spot such as Togo and Zimbabwe, while the Central African Republic, Eritrea, and Madagascar and Libya were the most deteriorated countries on the continent. To assist us on this topic, we were joined by Richard Murray- Acting head, Sif Heide-Ottosen, she is the analyst of the Ibrahim Index of African Governance and Yarik Turianskyi is the Programme Manager of SAIIA's Governance and APRM Programme.
10/10/201659 minutes, 42 seconds
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Fees must fall

University students in South Africa have been protesting for more than a month, demanding for free education in the country’s tertiary institutions. Currently the tension at the University of Witwatersrand, where in the past two weeks there has been violent conflict between police and protesting students. The country’s finance minister Pravin Gordhan said that the government has other priorities to deal with, either than providing free education. Gordhan was in New York for the South Africa Tomorrow Investor Conference. Today on the show we ask the question: Is free education an affordable reality for a developing country, like South Africa?On the line is: • Professor Hlonipha Mokoena Associate Professor W i S E R (Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research) University of the Witwatersrand.• Ihsaan Bassier, Economics at UCT, Honours.• Reg Rumney, independent consultant and economic researcher, • Musa Nnwande, spokesperson for the Fees Commission
10/6/201655 minutes, 51 seconds
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Maritime Heritage Workshop

How is Maritime a part of heritage for African countries, especially since the ocean economy and the shipping industry can be seen through the prism at the Africa’s colonial past? This was the question posed last week Maritime Heritage Project launched hosted at the Ghariep Dam ,in South Africa’s Free State Province. The event hosted by the Department of Transport and the South African Maritime Safety Authority aimed to situated and advance heritage. To explore this theme delegates including two African National Congress anti apartheid veterans were invited to explore the parties Aventura Liberation naval mission. To give us more information about the launch we have : Commander Fanele Mbali (one of the veterans) Sobantu Tilayi Acting Chief Executive Officer of the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)
10/5/201656 minutes, 33 seconds
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Maritime Heritage Workshop

How is Maritime a part of heritage for African countries, especially since the ocean economy and the shipping industry can be seen through the prism at the Africa’s colonial past? This was the question posed last week Maritime Heritage Project launched hosted at the Ghariep Dam ,in South Africa’s Free State Province. The event hosted by the Department of Transport and the South African Maritime Safety Authority aimed to situated and advance heritage. To explore this theme delegates including two African National Congress anti apartheid veterans were invited to explore the parties Aventura Liberation naval mission. To give us more information about the launch we have : Commander Fanele Mbali (one of the veterans) Sobantu Tilayi Acting Chief Executive Officer of the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)
10/5/201656 minutes, 33 seconds
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CITIES COP17 2ND last day

Today(04.10.2016), the delegates at CITES Cop17 adopted a resolution which “recommends that all Parties and non-Parties in whose jurisdiction there is a legal domestic market for ivory that is contributing to poaching or illegal trade, take all necessary legislative, regulatory and enforcement measures to close their domestic markets for commercial trade in raw and worked ivory as a matter of urgency. The resolution came on the 2nd last day of one of the biggest CITES meetings taking place at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg South Africa. Currently, 183 governments are members of CITES. This resolution adopted provides a framework for all CITES governments to address their national markets for elephant ivory. To look at some of the resolutions that have been made we are helped by :Mark Jones, and Associate Director at the Born Free FoundationDr Richard Thomas from TRAFFIC – The Wildlife Trade Monitoring and Co-ordinating organisationKelvin Alie , Acting Vice President, Animal Welfare and Conservation Programme Director at the International Fund for Animal Welfare
10/4/201659 minutes, 32 seconds
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Forestry Conference in Togo

The African Forestry Forum is a pan African non-governmental organisation that brings together individuals who share the quest for and commitment to the sustainable management, use and conservation of the forest and tree resources of Africa. The organisation has generated considerable information on various aspects of forestry and forestry including climate change, green economy, provision of quality tree germplasms , forest and tress pests and diseases, forest governance , and forest certification. As more stakeholders take steps towards developing and implementing forestry compatible development (FCD), the demand for information and knowledge on forestry, and more specifically on forest management, is growing rapidly. To talk to us about this we are joined by: 1. Prof Godwin Kowero Executive Secretary African Forestry Furum (AFF)2. Dr Mbolo Abada Marie Marguerite Senior Lecturer University Yaounde3. Humphrey Ngibuini Kenya Delegate
9/29/201656 minutes, 27 seconds
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Human Rights in Ethiopia

A group of civil society organizations are calling for an independent and impartial international investigation into human rights violations in Ethiopia, including the unlawful killing of peaceful protesters, and a recent spate of arrests of civil society members documenting this crackdown. Concerned organizations worried about the levels of persecution and detention of civil society members in the country include, DefendDefenders (East and Horn of African Human Rights Defenders Project), the Association for Human Rights in Ethiopia, Amnesty International, the Ethiopia Human Rights Project, Front Line Defenders, and the International Federation for Human Rights. To help us unpack this, we are joined on the line by:Coletta Wanjohi: Channel Africa News Correspondent based in Addis AbabaYared Hailemariam: Executive Director: Association for Human Rights in Ethiopia (AHRE)Fisseha Desta : an Ethiopian Researcher based in Kenya.
9/28/201654 minutes, 8 seconds
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CITES part 2

Annually, international wildlife trade is estimated to be worth billions of dollars and to include hundreds of millions of plant and animal specimens. The trade is diverse, ranging from live animals and plants to a vast array of wildlife products derived from them, including food products, exotic leather goods, wooden musical instruments, timber, tourist curios and medicines. Levels of exploitation of some animal and plant species are high and the trade in them, together with other factors, such as habitat loss, is capable of heavily depleting their populations and even bringing some species close to extinction. Many wildlife species in trade are not endangered, but the existence of an agreement to ensure the sustainability of the trade is important in order to safeguard these resources for the future. CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) is an international agreement between governments. Its aim is to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival. CITES COP17 Conference and Exhibition is currently on the go at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg South Africa. Channel Africa is there, and to tell us about the topics being discussed we have:John E Scanlon, Secretary General of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and FloraMaximiliano Bello, Senior Advisor for the Global Shark Conservation Initiative of the Non Governmental Organisation - PEW Charitable Trusts.Dr Richard Thomas – From The Wildlife Trade Monitory and Co-ordinating Organisation – TRAFFIC.Nicci Wright, from the African Pangolin Working Group
9/27/201645 minutes, 33 seconds
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CITES Preview

The Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) hosts its 17th conference from the 24th September to the 05th October. During the conference the delegates will collectively evaluate progress made since 2013 at the last conference. They will further take more decisions that will be aimed at ending the illicit wildlife trafficking. The conference will also deliberate on matters around bring additional species under the CITES trade controls. African Dialogue will be broadcasting LIVE from the conference in Johannesburg in the coming weeks…To help us discuss this we are now joined on the line by:1. Kelvin Alie Acting Vice President Animal Welfare and Conservation Programme International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW)2. Jason Bell Regional Director: Southern Africa – Elephants International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW)3. Albi Modisa Spokesperson Department of Environmental Affairs 4. Juan Carlos Vasquez Chief Legal and Compliance Unit CITES Secretariat
9/22/201655 minutes, 58 seconds
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DRC Crisis

Activists in the Democratic Republic of Congo say at least 17 people have been killed during clashes between police and protesters in the capital, Kinshasa. Anti-government protestors in the Democratic Republic of Congo have blocked roads and burned vehicles in the capital, Kinshasa, after police stopped them from staging a march. The demonstrators are demanding that President Joseph Kabila step down when his mandate ends in December. Riot police used tear gas to disperse hundreds of people who were throwing stones as they tried to march towards parliament. To help us discuss this we are now joined on the line by:• Richard Iroanya: Peace Building and Conflict Transformation Department at the University of South Africa. • Aditi Lalbahadur: Programme Manager: Foreign Policy at the South African Institute of International Affairs• Jean Noel Ba-Mweze: Channel Africa correspondent in the DRC, Kinshasa• Ben Mpoko: DRC Ambassador to South Africa
9/21/201657 minutes, 20 seconds
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Illegal Mining

Mining experts are saying it is time for the mining companies and mineral resources ministry to issue a pronouncement on the scourge of illegal mining in South Africa. The illegal miners, or Zama-Zamas, have been operating in disused mines for years, and the government apparently has no way of ending this illicit and dangerous enterprise. In the wake of illegal miners being trapped at an abandoned mine in Langlaagte, south of Johannesburg, the Chamber of Mines says illegal mining remains a serious challenge for the industry and South Africa amid rising unemployment and poverty. According to the South African Human Rights Commission there are 8 to 30 thousand illegal miners in South Africa. To help us discuss this we are now joined on the line by:• Ross Harvey is a visiting Research Fellow with SAIIA’s Governance of Africa’s Resources Programme in Cape Town. • Jaco Kok: Environmental Geologist• Hassan Logart: Bench Marks Foundation• Thandiwe Matthews, South African Human Rights Commission.
9/19/20161 hour, 42 seconds
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AFRICAN AEROSPACE AND DEFENCE EXHIBITION

The Africa Aerospace and Defence (AAD) exhibition is underway at the Air Force Base Waterkloof, in Centurion, Pretoria, South Africa this week with defence technology taking centre stage. The Africa Aerospace and Defence is one of the world’s premier Aerospace and Defence exhibition that holds a prominent position within the Aviation and Defence calendar. This exhibition takes place biannually in September. The first three days of the exhibition are traditionally trade days, followed by two airshow days that are open to the public. Among the highlights of this year’s event was smart bombs, unmanned drones and heat sensor cameras which can be operated from a smartphone. The exhibition,- which is expected to run until September 16, also features an air show expected to take place on the weekend. To help us describe whats happening at the event, we have:Hennie Smit Manager of Business Development at South Africa’s Arms and Defence company Denel’s Vehicle Systems divisionBrigadier General Christian Masuku from the Zimbabwe Defence Industry (ZDI)Marie Botha Account Manager with the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)
9/15/201654 minutes, 13 seconds
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Land Rehabilitation

Today is the opening of the Land Rehabilitation Society of Southern Africa 2017 conference, which is underway in Kimberley, Northern Cape Province of South Africa. This is the fourth year that the conference is running and the theme this time around is The Rehabilitation Business Case. This theme will cover issues surrounding ecosystem functions and the rehabilitation of communities. Scientists and practitioners in the agricultural sector are gathered to discuss land issues in Southern Africa. To help us unpack this, we are now joined on the line from Kimberly; by: 1. Raina Hattingh Land Fix Managing Director 2. Menzi Khuzwayo Maccaferri Sales Engineer 3. Dr Piet Louis Grundling Department of Environmental Affairs Deputy Director: Programme Implementation:Wetlands4. Ian Jones Earth Science Solutions Director
9/13/201657 minutes, 5 seconds
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Zambia's Election

Channel Africa has been reliably told that leader of opposition, Hakainde Hichilema and his running mate Geoffrey Bwalya Mwamba will be challenging the Constitutional Court ruling in a court this morning. The Lusaka High Court last week Friday thrown out an application by opposition leader to halt the inauguration ceremony to be held tomorrow. In his ruling, Judge Mwila Chitabo said the court had no jurisdiction to make such a decision. Hichilema and his running mate were seeking the High Court's interpretation of the Constitutional Court's decision to deny them their fundamental right to be heard over their election petition. To help us unpack this we are joined by:KAMOFISA MANCHIESI INFORMATION AND RESEARCHER WITH MISA ZAMBIAGary van Staden: Senior Political Analyst at NKC Professor Kealeboga Maphunye: Chair of the forum for Democracy At the University of South Africa
9/12/201657 minutes, 16 seconds
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Democracy in Africa

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Democracy is annually held on September 15 to raise public awareness about democracy. Many people and organizations worldwide, including government agencies and non-government organizations, hold various initiatives to promote democracy on the International Day of Democracy. Events and activities include discussions, conferences and press conferences involving keynote speakers, often those who are leaders or educators heavily involved in supporting and endorsing democratic governments and communities. But have we really realised the fruits of democracy? Are those countries that say they are democratic really practice democracy fully fledged?To help to unpack this global crisis we have on the line:……1. Martin Chungong Secretary General Inter-Parliamentary Union2. Ibrahim Fakir Manager Electoral Institute for Sustainability of Democracy in Africa3. Dr Augustine Mogolowond Director Institute of Democracy for Africa
9/8/201652 minutes, 39 seconds
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ANC Internal Battles

ANC VERSUS ANCThe #OccupyLuthuliHouse protest was cancelled at the 11th hour following threats of violence and intimidation against its organisers. Organisers said they had expected about 3 thousand ANC supporters to attend the protest, but pleaded with them to stay away because of the strong security detail around the party’s headquarters in central Johannesburg. But why is the ANC fighting amongst itself, and what are the political ramifications of the #OccupyLuthuliHouse protest? Well, to answer some of these questions, we are joined on the line by:Ben Turok: ANC Veteran:Levy Ndou: Political Analyst at the Tshwane University of Technology: Dr Mcebisi Mdletjana: Dr Mcebisi Ndletyana, Professor of Political Science at the University of Johannesburg
9/7/201657 minutes, 50 seconds
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Re-look at the G20

The G20 Summit in China’s lakeside city of Hangzhou has come to a close, but for all of the country’s preparations, analysts opine that diplomatic wrangles and unrealised ambitions dominated the proceedings. Global economic leaders stepped up warnings that the populist mood sweeping many developed nations is a threat to trade and growth, calling from the side-lines of the Group of 20 summit for governments and businesses to fight to keep goods flowing across borders. To help us navigate through this we are joined on the line by:Marienne Bouneventure Goldman: Governance Advisor at Oxfam: Patrick Bond: Director for the Centre for Civil Society: (STUDIO GUEST)Ms Asmita Parshotam : Research Specialist at the South African Institute of International Affairs:
9/6/201657 minutes, 56 seconds
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Politics of hair

On the program today we talk about the "politics of hair" this comes after the debacle around leaners at the Pretoria Girls High School in South Africa who were restricted from attending school with their afro hair.
9/5/20161 hour, 44 seconds
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Traditional Healers day

Commemoration of the African Traditional Medicine Day today coincides with the date, 31 August 2000, on which the ministers of health adopted the relevant resolution at the 50th session of the World Health Organisation Regional Committee for Africa in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Traditional African medicine involves the use of herbal concoctions and traditional rituals to treat a patient. There are two main types of traditional healers in South Africa – the Sangoma and the Inyanga. Sangomas generally, rely on rituals and traditional practices to treat a patient’s ailments while an inyanga uses parts of plants, herbs, and animal parts for therapeutic purposes.. To help us unpack this, we are now joined on the line byPretty Lukhele – A Traditional Healer.Dr Nhlavana Maselo – President of the SA Traditional Healers Association
9/1/201657 minutes, 23 seconds
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Peacekeeping Africa 2nd day

Africa continues to grapple for solutions in the Peacekeeping and Logistics sphere. In the quest of creating an objective platform and incisive dialogue, the Intelligence Transfer Centre brought together 400 delegates for a two day meeting in Midrand South Africa entitiled "The 2nd Annual Peacekeeping and Logistics Africa Conference. One of the outcomes of the discussions was that peace begins with politicians through dialogue. To tell us more we have :Lieutenant General Derrick Mbuyiselo Mgwebi, Force Commander of the United Nations Stabalising mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Antonia N'Gabala- Sodonon, Acting Head of the Post Conflict Reconstruction Division and project co-ordinator of Gender, Peace and Stability at the African Union Commission,Patrick Tseko Mahlangu, Chief Instructor of at the Peace Mission Training Centre of the South African Defence Force:
8/31/201655 minutes, 59 seconds
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Peacekeeping Africa

Africa continues to grapple for solutions in the Peacekeeping and Logistics sphere and in the quest of creating and objective platform and incisive dialogue, The Intelligence Transfer Centre is holding the 2nd Annual Peacekeeping and Logistics Africa Conference in Midrand South Africa. This conference, which began today brings together some of the most dynamic minds in the Peacekeeping and Logistics arena, who are expected to deliver thought provoking and hard hitting presentations. Speaker organisations include: United Nations, Kenya Defence Force, East Africa Standby Force, African Union Commission and South African National Defence Force among others. To tell us more we have:Major Chris Buckham, a Canadian with the International Peacekeeping Training Centre .Ambassador Philip Jada Natana, South Sudan’s Ambassador to South AfricaDr Norman Sempijja, a Ugandan Post Doctoral Research Fellow at the Department of International Relations at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa
8/30/201656 minutes, 35 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
8/29/201658 minutes, 14 seconds
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MINORITY LOCAL GOVERNANCE

Since the upset in local elections of South Africa's ruling African National Congress party, which saw the ANC lose three major metros to the opposition, namely the capital Pretoria, the host of the parliament - Cape Town, and the Country's main economic hub, Johannesburg, talk of a new era in politics has bee debated. The official Opposition party - the Democratic Alliance Party - did not have an outright win in two of the municipalities so had to rely on coalitions and supporting votes from the second major opposition party the EFF. This has established , for the first time, Minority local governance. How will this affect local government? To help us answer that question we have: Phephelaphi Dube, Director for the Centre for Constitutional Rights, Sanusha Naidu, s political and foreign policy analyst, Ozias Ncube A senior Lecturer at South Africa's Graduate School of Business Leadership
8/25/201656 minutes, 43 seconds
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Preview for World Humanitarian day

Tomorrow is World International Day. The nineteenth of August has been designated by the United Nations General Assembly, and is dedicated to recognize humanitarian personnel. Most humanitarian work is on the African continent, attributed to civil wars, poverty and natural disasters. There has been some criticism to humanitarian work on the continent has been ethnocentrism, which is when one’s societal value is used to judge another’s society. Critics of foreign humanitarian efforts in Africa argue that Western society’s obsession with “saving” Africa bear traces of ethnocentrism.To look at the day we are joined by: • Jens Pedersen - Humanitarian Policy Adviser, Doctors Without Borders(STUDIO GUEST) • Markku Aikomus Senior Regional External Relations Officer UNHCR Regional Office for Southern Africa • Dewa Mavhinga, Senior Africa Researcher,Human Rights Watch,
8/18/201655 minutes, 58 seconds
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Public Protector

The office of the Public Protector or Ombudsman as they are called in various African countries like Kenya and Tanzania, has attracted enormous interest over the year like in South Africa, where the Public Protector has been praised and vilified in equal measure. But what is the difference between and a Public Protector? Ombudsman is an official appointed to investigate individuals' complaints against maladministration, especially that of public authorities and big corporations. Ombudsman mediate settlements and the services of ombudsman are free, on the other hand The Public Protector plays the similar role but strictly confined to any matter reported by citizens in group or individuals. The matter can be against the President of the country or civil servant. To help us understand how the Office of the Public Protector or an Ombudsman works, we are joined on the line by:David Lewis: Executive Director: Corruption Watch: Lawson Naidoo: Council for the Advancement of the South African Constitution: Professor Shadrack Gutto: Professor and Editor at the Institute for African Renaissance Studies.
8/17/201656 minutes, 54 seconds
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National Conference on Violence and its Prevention

South Africa still experiences high levels of deaths, injuries and social disability and disruption as a result of violence, despite the political and social transformation since 1994 when it gained its independence. Women and children continue to the most affected by this scourge. The everyday acts of interpersonal violence, episodic outbreaks of collective violence and overt forms of violence produce profound consequences for the country and its people. The conference organisers of the first National Conference on Violence and its Prevention is hosting researchers, activists, peace and development workers, NGOs, students, policy workers and the business community to come up with people centred solutions. To help us unpack what really took place at the summit we are joined on the line by: • Prof Ashley Van Niekerk: Conference Co-Chair• Prof Kopano Ratele: Institute of Social and Health Sciences, UNISA and Medical Research Council.• Rebecca Helman: Institute of Social and Health Sciences, UNISA and Medical Research Council
8/16/201657 minutes, 34 seconds
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Mozambique peace talks

Former Botswana President, Sir Ketumile Masire, nominated by the London-based Global Leadership Foundation to mediate in the on and off Mozambican Peace Talks, started his mission on Monday last week, to facilitate negotiations to end the low-level war between the armed opposition and the government of President Felipe Nyusi. Two decades after the end of Mozambique’s bloody civil war, and over a year and half after the ruling party, the Mozambique Liberation Front won elections on October 15 two years ago, tensions have been running high with opposition Renamo, who have rejected the results of the elections.To assist us on this we are joined by: • Fernando Gonsalves: Mozambican Journalist, a Post-graduate in Social Theory and Cultural Policy from the University of Lisbon. • Professor Andre Thomashuizen: Director Department of Law at the University of South Africa: • Ephraim Charlie Khumalo: Senior Journalist and Channel Africa Executive Producer: Portuguese Service:
8/15/201657 minutes, 7 seconds
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YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS

Sub-Saharan Africa has the fastest population growth projected between now and 2050 and the highest youth population in the world. With struggling economies Africa has to invest in mobilising its youth to participate in their economies and governments on the continent have no choice but to factor the youth population into its social development agenda. With challenges of unemployment, countries such South Africa with almost 50% of unemployed youth and Nigeria’s 13%, there is no doubt that entrepreneurship and innovative employment strategies need to be employed. To assist us on this we are joined by: Catherine Wijnberg is the CEO of Fetola. Andile Gumbi runs Nyachengos, a video company in Durban, KZN. He recently won R600 000 for best entrepreneur. His mentor has praised his participative approach to the Tholoana programme, his pro-active marketing of his work, and new contracts to shoot some series. Teboho Nkwanyana runs The Salad Lab in Standerton, Mpumalanga, a business that packages fresh vegetables and salads for caterers and home chefs. He has made great strides with his business since commencing the programme. He is a star participant, fully engaged with working with a mentor, attending workshops, utilising the e-learning platform and other supportive. The SAB Foundation Tholoana Enterprise Development programme is a two-year programme offering specialised business mentorship, workshops, e-learning modules, as well as investment readiness support. The focus is on small entrepreneurs in rural and peri-urban areas, as well as businesses that support or are owned by youth, women, and people living with disability. Primrose Z.J BimhaSamantha Ndiwalana: Fellow, Association of Allan Gray Fellows:Project Manager, Building Bridges Foundation
8/11/201659 minutes, 14 seconds
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Zambian elections

Zambia's main opposition leader has accused the government of using repressive laws to restrict his election campaign and said violence by supporters of the ruling Patriotic Front would prevent tomorrow’s polls from being free and fair. However, the African Union observer mission said political parties in Zambia were still able to conduct their campaign activities without major disruption despite some incidences of violence. Zambia holds presidential and parliamentary elections tomorrow. President Edgar Lungu faces a strong challenge from opposition leader Hakainde Hichilema after last year's neck-and-neck race. To help us look into this, we are joined on the line by:Gary van Staden: Senior Political Analyst at NKCProfessor Sitwala Imenda: Science Education at University of Zululand (The question of Barotse Land is still a hot poptato for Zambia;s current authorities. Some people have been arrested for voicing their voices) Rev. Suzanne Matale: General Secretary: The Council of Churches in Zambia
8/10/201654 minutes, 40 seconds
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Pan African Parliament

The 2nd Annual Sitting of the Committees of the 4th Parliament Of The Pan African Parliament (PAP), is taking place at the precincts of the PAP located at Gallagher Estate, Midrand in South Africa The committee sitting is touching on a wide range of topics especially the theme of the year which is "2016: African Year of Human Rights with a particular Focus on the Rights of Women". Issues debated among committee members and presentations are being done by invited organisations, which in turn, will be discussed and critiqued by the respective committee sitting. The main purpose of the Annual Conference of Speakers and the Annual Meeting of Secretary-Generals of African Parliaments is to promote a speedy ratification, domestication and implementation of the AU treaties, in particular the new Protocol of the PAP. To tell us more, we’re joined by:Hon. Dr Bernadette Lahai: 4th Vice President of the Pan African Parliament, and a Parliamentarian from Sierra Leone.Hon. Abdulrazak Sa'ad Namdas : Parliamentarian from NigeriaHon. Cecilia Chazama: Parliamentarian from MalawiHon. Stephen Masele : Parliamentarian from Tanzania
8/4/201658 minutes, 3 seconds
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Women's Rights

South African women in 1956 took stance to stand up against the apartheid government. The theme of that march was called “Wathintaabafaziwathintaimbokoto” (You strike a women you strike a rock). Amongst the women were Sophie De Bruyn, Helen Joseph, Bertha Mashaba and Winnie Mandela. Many of the African women wore traditional dresses, others wore the Congress colours, green, black and gold; Indian women were clothed in white saris. Many women had babies on their backs and some domestic workers brought their white employers' children along with them. Throughout the demonstration the huge crowd displayed a discipline and dignity that was deeply impressive.To help us discuss the issue we have:Dr Jessie Kabwila,A Feminist Politician in the Parliament of Malawi.
8/2/201655 minutes, 41 seconds
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FOOD SECURITY IN SOUTHERN AFRICA

South Africa is ranked at 47 out of the 113 countries in this year’s Global Food Security Index (GFSI).The country ranked first among its sub-Saharan African peers and landed in the top ten of upper-middle-income countries, with Malaysia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Brazil and China claiming the top five spots in this category. Meanwhile, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned that, millions of farmers throughout the SADeC region need urgent assistance to prepare for the next planting season. To assist us to look at this issue of food security we have: • Prabdeep Bajwa, Regional Business Director for DuPont Pioneer Africa • Timo Pakkala, the El Nino Senior Coordinator for Southern Africa for the United Nations office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.
8/1/201656 minutes, 16 seconds
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Zimbabwean uprising

Communities around the African continent have awoken to Hashtag activism in trying to address their political, social and economic concerns. Hashtag activism is described as the act of supporting a cause that is being advocated through social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and other networking websites. Although sometimes criticized for its lack of effectiveness and promotion of lazy activism, it is the implementation of social media as a platform to raise awareness on a multitude of issues. But how effective is this activism vis-à-vis party political pressure on a government or an institution like a university? You’ll recall the #Feesmustfall in South Africa, the Arab Spring and now Zimbabweans have turned on the screws on government by starting the #This Flag, that is mobilising for a regime change in that country. To help us navigate through this social media phenomenon, we are joined on the line by: Sibanengi Dube : Zimbabwe Exiles Forum Trust Matsilela: A Zimbabwe journalist based in Johannesburg and is a PHD student researching on the effects of social media at the Johannesburg University Jealousy Mawarire: National Spokesperson, Zimbabwe People First (ZimPF).Ibo Mandaza: Zimbabwean Political Analyst
7/28/201656 minutes, 24 seconds
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South African Elections: Public Participation

South Africans have less than ten days before they can go to the polls to elect the municipal representatives of their choice in their voting districts. On August 3, votes will head to the 22 000 voting stations across the country to vote for local councillors and majors for their municipalities. As significant as this vote is, how do local communities hold their government officials accountable after the elections, and how important is public participation in the governance of municipalities? To assist us on this program we are joined by: • David Kode, Senior Policy and Research Officer, CIVICUS • Matshidiso Motsoeneng, who is a Researcher at Studies in Poverty and Inequality Institute • Tarisai Mugunyani, attorney from Lawyers for Human Rights
7/27/201656 minutes, 15 seconds
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South Sudan analysis

At the weekend, South Sudan Vice President Riek Machar reportedly fired a minister who he said had defected to his long-time rival President Salva Kiir's party. The rift between Machar and Taban Deng Gai has raised the prospect of further turmoil after months of fighting, as members of a faction led by Gai threatened to replace their leader. Two years of civil war that erupted after Kiir sacked Machar as Vice President in 2013, has killed more than 10-thousand people and displaced over 2 million, many of whom fled to neighbouring countries. In a letter to party members and his military commanders late on Friday, Machar said Gai will be relieved of his position as mining minister, and had been expelled from the party. Machar left the capital last week after a new outbreak of clashes, saying he would only return when an international body set up a buffer force to separate his forces from Kiir's. To help us analyse the current situation, we spoke to :South Sudan's Ambassador to South Africa, Phillip Jada Natana; Daniel Bekele of Human Rights Watch based in Addis Ababa, Professor Fanie Vermark, from the University of South Africa:Mawan Muortat: South Sudanese Political Commentator
7/25/201655 minutes, 53 seconds
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After the African Summit 2016

The 27th African Union summit wrapped up on Monday, in Kigali, Rwanda, and still had not elected their new chairperson for the union’s commission. So, the current chair Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma was asked to stay on until January next year. None of the three candidates contesting the position received the necessary two-thirds majority vote required. Dominating the talks was the political crisis in South Sudan, the African e-passport for heads of state and the self-sufficiency of the African union to fund itself. To look back at the summit we are joining us on the line we have: Adv. Pansy Tlakula: Chairperson & Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression and Access to Information in Africa at the African Commission on Human Rights and People’s RightsProfessor: Tim Muruthi: Head; Justice and Reconciliation in Africa and Extraordinary Professor of African Studies at the University of the Free State in South Africa. Professor ShadrackGutto: Editor at the Institute for African Renaissance Studies, at UNISA
7/21/201658 minutes, 56 seconds
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Zambian Election Campaign

Zambians are going to the polls on the 11th of next month to elect the President and participate in general elections. The vote is expected to be a close contest between Edgar Lungu from the governing Patriotic Front, and Hakainde Hichilema from the United Party for National Development. However, violence, which is foreign in Zambian politics, has been a spoiler. To help us unpack these elections, we are now joined on the line by:Electoral Commission of Zambia: Chris Akufuna: Rev. Suzanne Matale: General Secretary: The Council of Churches in Zambia Gary van Staden: Senior Political Analyst at NKC
7/20/201659 minutes, 10 seconds
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Zambian election campaign

Zambians are going to the polls on the 11th of next month to elect the President and participate in general elections. The vote is expected to be a close contest between Edgar Lungu from the governing Patriotic Front, and Hakainde Hichilema from the United Party for National Development. However, violence, which is foreign in Zambian politics, has been a spoiler. To help us unpack these elections, we are now joined on the line by:Electoral Commission of Zambia: Chris Akufuna: Rev. Suzanne Matale: General Secretary: The Council of Churches in Zambia Gary van Staden: Senior Political Analyst at NKC
7/20/201659 minutes, 10 seconds
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International Aids Conference

Thousands of scientists, health experts, politicians, philanthropists and civil society representatives have gathered at the International AIDS Conference, which started yesterday in Durban, South Africa. The conference, which returns 20 years since it was last hosted in the coastal city, aims to advance knowledge about HIV and to build innovative partnerships to strengthen global response to the epidemic. Yesterday UN General Secretary Ban-Ki Moon called for this year’s gathering to mark the end of the commitment to a new era of a fast tracked response. However yesterday, about five thousand people marched outside the International Convention Centre in Durban, where the conference is being held. The Treatment Action Campaign, as one of the civil organisations involved in the march, highlighted that there was a huge disconnect between promises made and the realities on the ground. Now joining us on the line we have: • Professor Helen Rees is Executive Director of the Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, • Professor Geoffrey Setswe,Deputy Executive Director HIV/AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Infections & TB Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC)• AyandaYawa, Treatment Action Campaign General Secretary Dr Nothemba (Nono) Simelela - Currently the Advisor to the Deputy President on HIV, TB and Sexually Transmitted Infections (She was also the Chair of the 7th South African AIDS Conference hosted in Durban June 2015)
7/19/201657 minutes, 59 seconds
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Mandela Day

July the 18th is International Mandela day when people around the world are asked to spend 67 minutes doing community service. They day is in remembrance of the years spent in prison by anti Apartheid fighter and former South African President Nelson Mandela who was known for his humanity. Channel Africa joined up with Radio 2000 in partnership with Joburg City Parks, Aranda, Nedbank, Iskcon and Venus Security for a project called “67 Minutes of Love”, which saw South Africans spending the day giving love to the homeless and needy in Joubert Park in Johannesburg. Donated blankets and food hampers were handed out, along with teams feeding bread and soup to the homeless. This wall followed the cleaning the park. Channel Africa also had an outside broadcast so we could talk to some of those involved which included :Mark Puillay : Representative for Gift of the GiversMandla Khumalo: Representative for Coca Cola Beverages SALebogang Maile : MEC for GautengDenzil Goldstorne : of thr Berea Community Police ForumDion Esso : Berea FirefighterKebokile Mosweu: SABC representative
7/18/201654 minutes, 15 seconds
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Zimbabwe crisis

In collective actions reminiscent of a period nearly a decade ago of political tension and economic collapse in Zimbabwe, citizen activists and labour unions have recently organised a work stay away and a three-day nationwide strike. Frustration over a deepening liquidity crisis has put the 36-year-old government under increasing pressure to address the deteriorating economic situation, which analysts say could push protests to continue if the underlying issues remain unaddressed. To help us unpack what is really happening politically, socially and economically in Zimbabwe, we are now joined in studio and on the line by:Adv. Gabriel Shumba: Zimbabwe Exiles Lovemore Kadenge: President of the Zimbabwe Economics Society. Promise Mkwananzi: Spokesperson for Tajumuka-Sesijikile Campaign in Harare:
7/14/201655 minutes, 51 seconds
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Nelson Mandela tribute

Former South African President and Nobel Prize laureate Nelson Mandela has had a lot of literature written about him by various Authors. The late statesman’s life was more of a political than a family man until the last years of his life. Books like “Conversation with myself, Long Walk to Freedom and The Struggle is my life” are some of the books that better depict the life of Mandela. All the authors of Mandela’s life share the common idea that Mandela was a selfless struggle icon with pristine leadership qualities. In 2013 the book “Long walk to freedom” was translated into a film and received international audiences around the world. But today our focus a little different, we want to focus on those individuals that have earned the fruits of the youth of 76’. To do so we are joined on the line by:1. Mac Maharaj Mandela’s friend and Robben island prisoner2. Mike Nicol Author3. Sophie Mokoena SABC Foreign Editor
7/13/201657 minutes, 29 seconds
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Regional Integration

The East African Community has been cited as the most integrated region in Africa. This is according to the Africa Regional Integration Index report which was launched at the beginning of April in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. This is the first initiative to be developed to measure the progress on regional integration in the continent. Africa has spent much of the past decade investing in physical infrastructure, but it must not forget the development of human capital, the report urges. Investing in education, particularly in science and technology, will bring about great gains for the citizens of the continent. To assist us on this topic we are now joined by: • Kudzanayi Bangure - Manager at the NBF's Africa Infrastructure Desk and he will focus on Africa's integration specifically focusing on integration through transport corridors. • Lesley Wentworth, She is the head of an initiative focused on SADC's integration and industrialisation call the Southern Africa Business Forum (SABF). • Tralac researcher, William Mwanza
7/12/201651 minutes, 57 seconds
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Oscar Pistorius sentence outcry

South African Paralympian Oscar Pistorius spent his first week in prison after he was sentenced to 6 years in jail by High Court Judge Thokozile Masipa for the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. In handing out the verdict the judge said she found compelling and substantial circumstances that persuaded her to deviate from the minimum sentence of 15 years imprisonment. Following the sentence the Para olympian said he would not appeal the six year sentence. To talk to us about this we are joined by: 1. Karin Van Eck Legal Expert 2. Ulrich Roux Defence and Litigation Lawyer BDK Attorneys
7/11/201657 minutes, 20 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
7/7/201659 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Middle Class

According to a new study, the US middle class is disappearing". According to the Pew Research Centre, the middle-income families no longer made up the majority in America.A study has revealed that households are increasingly cutting back on living expenses as they grapple with their stressful financial positions. This is one of the findings from the 2016 Old Mutual Savings and Investment Monitor, released today, which tracks the shifts in the financial attitudes and behaviour of South Africa's working metropolitan population.To discuss this we are joined by: • Asmita Parshotam,Researcher: Economic DiplomacySouth African Institute of International Affairs,
7/6/201655 minutes, 53 seconds
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South African Transport Conference

The Annual Southern African Transport Conference and Exhibition is currently underway in South Africa’s capital Pretoria under the theme – “Transport: A catalyst for socio-economic growth and development opportunities to improve the quality of life”. The SACT was started in 1982 with the need to transfer knowledge and build capacity within the transport sector. The conference brings together key role players in the transport sector such as Engineers, Academics, Manufacturers, Government officials and policy makers in transport. The South African Transport Minister Dipuo Peters in opening the conference highlighted that efficient transport systemsprovide socio-economic opportunities and benefits that result in positive multiplier effects such as a better accessibility to markets, employment and additional investments.To talk to us about this we are joined by: Conf1. Professor James Maina Chairperson: SATC Organising Committee2. Mr Pieter van Niekerk Member of ATC Company Directors 3. Professor Alex Visser : Director of the Organising Committee of the Conference
7/5/201655 minutes, 50 seconds
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Local Government Elections in South Africa

Local government in all its facets may at first seem very complicated and confusing, but it is only when the roles and functions of local governance are explained and simplified, that the electorate can make informed decisions. Local government elections will be taking place on the 3rd of August, and it is particularly important that the electorate understand the intricacies of these elections and how they differ from Provincial and National Elections. Today we will be focusing on the functions and responsibilities of all spheres of local government including and to help us unpack this important sphere of governance, we are joined on the line by:Guests:1. Tinyiko Maluleke Political Analyst Unisa2. Sanusha Naidoo Political Analyst 3. Levy Ndou Political Analyst
7/4/201658 minutes, 2 seconds
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Blessers

In recent months people have been talking about the term “BLESSER”. The term allegedly originated when several young women posted pictures of themselves shopping overseas, driving expensive cars or wearing expensive clothing.These women would then be blessed on social media. The phenomenon has gone viral, with many young women looking for older men to sponsor their expensive lifestyles. But the men, some of whom are married, may be blessing more than one woman. So in drawing to a close “Youth Month” we want to discuss this phenomenon and find out what really is the mind-set of a blesser and blessee.To talk to us about this we are joined by: 1. Ms Thato Chidarikire : Department of Health Director: HIV Prevention 2. Professor Cheryl-Ann Potgieter: Deputy Vice Chancellor University of Kwa-Zulu Natal3. Mr Dumisani Rebombo : Sonke Gender Justice Manager: One Man Can campaign
6/30/201656 minutes, 52 seconds
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Brexit Part 2

Britain is to be excluded from a meeting of European Union leaders later, the first this has happened for more than 40 years. The other 27 EU member states are holding formal talks over the implications of last week's British vote to leave the bloc. Meanwhile, the leader of the main opposition Labour party, Jeremy Corbyn looks certain to face a challenge after refusing to stand down, despite an overwhelming vote of no confidence by his MP's.We spoke to:• Cyril Prinsloo, Researcher under the Economic Diplomacy Programme, • Professor Geoffry Heald, Wits Business School
6/29/201658 minutes, 20 seconds
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SOUTH AFRICAN LOCAL ELECTIONS

Just slightly less than six weeks ahead of the 2016 Local government elections, the ANC is to battling on many fronts to contain the fallout from a deep political crisis. The party is deeply divided and in its weakest state ever. It is not only struggling to contain the wider social, economic and political crisis, but it is also forced to fight to manage the internal factional battles which are threatening to tear it apart. To look at these new developments as we keep tabs on the Local Government Elections we are joined on the line by:Dr Somadoda Fikeni Independent Political Analyst ZANELE NENE: A Researcher at the Institutional Audit Directorate a former Political Science lecturer at the University of KwaZulu-NatalMOSOTHO MOEPYA: Chief Electoral Officer wit the IEC
6/28/201657 minutes, 14 seconds
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Africa rising

The narrative of Africa rising has one that has been challenged in the last year, as global commodity demand and lower oil prices have altered expectations for the continent. In this climate, there also political challenges that African countries face, which at times deter investment and attraction from the rest of the world. Today we ask the question, is the African rising narrative still a reality for the continent.We speak to:• Theo Sibiya - Partner at A.T. Kearney and keynote speaker• Prof Rwelamila - Professor of Project Management and Project Procurement Systems (Unisa Graduate School of Business Leadership)• Brand South Africa’s GM for Communications, Ms Manusha Pillai
6/27/201659 minutes, 59 seconds
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Public Service Day

Today we are marking Public Service Day. Empowering women to participate fully in economic life across all sectors is essential to build stronger economies, achieve internationally agreed goals for development and sustainability, and improve the quality of life for women, men, families and communities. The public service sector is a key partner in efforts to advance gender equality and empower women.To look at this topic we are joined on the line by:• Dr Jessie Kabwila: Member of Parliament: Chair Women Caucus: Parliament of Malawi • Tiseki Kasambala: Deputy Executive Director: Open Society Initiative of Southern Africa• Sharon Mmaphala Mokubedi: Masters student in Bio Techonology at the University of Johannesburg
6/23/201656 minutes, 2 seconds
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Britain referendum also known as "Brexit"

The United Kingdom will go to the polls tomorrow for a referendum, known as Brexit, which will decide if it stays or leaves the European Union. Twenty-eight European countries are members of the EU, a group that traces its roots back to the days after World War II. The idea was to use the organization to promote trade but it's turned into something much larger. As much as this will have implication or the European Union, analysts also suggest that if the vote is in favour for the UK to leave the EU, it will have consequences for Africa. To look at this topic we are joined on the line by:• Asmita Parshotam, Researcher: Economic Diplomacy at the South African Institute of International Affairs, • Professor Gilbert Khadiagala,Professor of International Relations and Head of Department at Wits University.
6/22/20161 hour, 7 seconds
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CITIES 17 AND ILLEGAL SALE OF IVORY AND RHINO HORN

Despite a near worldwide ban on the sale of elephant ivory, tens of thousands of African and Asian elephants continue to be slaughtered every year for their tusks. Every year, tens of thousands of elephants are brutally killed for their ivory. Between 2008 and 2013, the estimated death toll ranged between 30 thousand and 50 elephants per year. Despite all this, there are several countries that want to sell their ivory stocks and those that are opposing the lifting of a ban on ivory trade. Furthermore South Africa is going to be hosting the 17th meeting of its Conference of the Parties in Johannesburg To help us discuss this sensitive issue, we are now joined on the line by: Pelham Jones: Chairman of South Africa’s Private Rhino Owners Association. Ian Michler : A member of the Conservation Action Trust and Journalist Dr Colman O Criodain, WWF Wildlife Trade Analyst
6/21/201659 minutes, 59 seconds
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SOUTH AFRICA’S YOUTH PARLIAMENT

June in South Africa has been dubbed Youth Month; following the Soweto uprising that took place in 1976 where score of young students were gunned down by the regime at the time. These young students were marching against the use of Afrikaans as a medium in schools. Amongst the many were people like the world renowned Hector Petersen. Now in the spirit of youth month a Youth Parliament was formulated, that is where young people can sit and debate issues of national importance and further make recommendations to the National Assembly. Kids aged between 11 and 17 are selected to be members of the house, and special attention and preference also has been emphasized on kids with disabilities.So to talk more about the work of the Youth Parliament we are joined on the line by members of the Youth Parliament:1. Josias Masango Mpumalanga Ambassador2. WangaMulaudzi Limpopo Ambassador 3. Vuyisela Mboxela South African Youth Council Member for the Youth Parliament 4. Tsietsi Mokhele Project Officer – Youth Leadership Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund
6/20/201659 minutes, 52 seconds
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Statelessness

According to international law statelessness is the lack of nationality, or the absence of a recognized link between an individual and any state. A stateless person is someone who is not considered as a national by any state under the operation of its law; he or she has no citizenship or nationality. Some stateless persons are also refugees. However, not all refugees are stateless, and many persons who are stateless have never crossed an international border. To help us discuss these disturbing phenomena we are now joined on the line by:Leon Isaacson: Managing Director: Global Migration SA: Reg Immigration Practitioner Wayne Ncube: Attorney Litigation Unit at the South African Lawyers For Human
6/15/201658 minutes, 52 seconds
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Local Government Elections

The South African government announced the local elections will be held on August 3 this year. However a case in the country’s Constitutional Court underway today could change this. The Court is expected to deliver a judgement on the case of addresses of voters. Last month parliament was told that the Electoral Commission of South Africa did not have addresses of around 46% of more than 26 million people registered to vote. Other concerning issues in the build-up of the election have been violent protests, political killings and a struggling economy. To look at this topic we are joined on the line by:• Gary Pienaar, Research Manager of the Democracy, Governance & Service Delivery Programme at the Human Sciences Research Council, • Steven Gruzd, head of governance and African Peer Review MechanismProgramme, South African Institute of International Affairs • Ebrahim Fakir, the Manager of the Political Parties and Parliamentary Programme at the Electoral Institute for Sustainable Democracy in Africa (EISA)
6/14/201655 minutes, 53 seconds
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A TRC FOR SOUTH SUDAN?

The newly reconciled leaders of South Sudan have called for a South Africa-style truth and reconciliation commission to heal the scars of a gruesome war in the world's youngest nation. President SalvaKiir and the newly appointed vice-president, Riek Machar, foe, said in a joint they were committed to ensuring that South Sudan never again went through a civil war. The two leaders said the truth and reconciliation commission would have sweeping powers and be able to investigate everybody from "the poorest farmer to the most powerful politician".To look at this positive development we are joined on the line by:• HlengiweMkhize: TRC Reparations Committee• Professor Leon Wessels: South African Human Rights Commission
6/13/201659 minutes, 50 seconds
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Modern Slavery

A survey by anti-slavery campaign group Walk Free says nearly 4.5 million people worldwide, as slaves. The group's Global Slavery Index says India has the most slaves overall and Mauritania has the highest percentage. Walk Free Foundation says it found evidence of slavery in 167 countries it surveyed. The report defines slaves as people subject to forced labour, debt bondage, trafficking, sexual exploitation for money and forced or servile marriage. The report says Africa and Asia face the biggest challenges in eradicating slavery, while the practice is least prevalent in Europe. To discuss this we are joined on the line by:Annelize Theunissen: The National Freedom NetworkRichard Ots: International Organisation for Migration
6/9/201658 minutes, 31 seconds
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WEST AFRICA’S EBOLA SUCCESS

The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the Republic of Guinea Ebola-free today. This came forty-two days had passed since the Ebola virus was tested negative. Although Ebola has been confirmed to be contained experts cannot verify that it has been eliminated. This is not the first time the WHO has been announced being free of transmission last December. The original chain of transmission of the virus began in December 2013 and spanned across neighbouring countries including Sierra Leone and Liberia, killing more than 11,000 people. To look at the success story Africa’s response to Ebola we are joined by: • Dr Adinoyi Adeiza, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies health and care coordinator for Africa• Dr. Djoudalbaye Benjamin, a Senior Health Officer, the Head of Mission, African Union Support To Ebola Outbreak in West Africa (ASEOWA)
6/8/201657 minutes, 26 seconds
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WESTERN SAHARA

Mohamed Abdelaziz, the leader of the Western Sahara independence movement Polisario Front who died of lung cancer on Tuesday, was buried on Saturday in the disputed territory. The 68-year-old Abdelaziz spent more than 40 years fighting for independence for the territory, and was buried in part of the Western Sahara not controlled by Morocco. Local Sahrawi people are campaigning for the right to self-determination, but Morocco considers the territory to be part of the kingdom and insists its sovereignty cannot be challenged.. What impact will the death of Abdelaziz have on the Polisario Front? To answer this question we are joined on the line by:J.J.Cornish: Specialist on African Affairs and Radio Journalist Ibrahim Dean: Researcher: The Afro-Middle East Centre based in Johannesburg, South Africa: Dr Olivia Lwabukuna: Research Specialist at the Institute Of South Africa, a research unit of the Human Sciences Research Council
6/7/20161 hour, 53 seconds
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Western Sahara

Mohamed Abdelaziz, the leader of the Western Sahara independence movement Polisario Front who died of lung cancer on Tuesday, was buried on Saturday in the disputed territory. The 68-year-old Abdelaziz spent more than 40 years fighting for independence for the territory, and was buried in part of the Western Sahara not controlled by Morocco. Local Sahrawi people are campaigning for the right to self-determination, but Morocco considers the territory to be part of the kingdom and insists its sovereignty cannot be challenged.. What impact will the death of Abdelaziz have on the Polisario Front? To answer this question we are joined on the line by:J.J.Cornish: Specialist on African Affairs and Radio Journalist Ibrahim Dean: Researcher: The Afro-Middle East Centre based in Johannesburg, South Africa: Dr Olivia Lwabukuna: Research Specialist at the Institute Of South Africa, a research unit of the Human Sciences Research Council
6/7/20161 hour, 53 seconds
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Youth Month

June is celebrated as Youth Month in South Africa, with a specific focus on 16 June, which is also known as Youth Day. Youth Month pays tribute to the school pupils who lost their lives during the 16 June 1976 uprising in Soweto. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Soweto uprisings. The theme for Youth Month is: “Youth Moving South Africa Forward”. On 16 June 1976, more than 15 000 students gathered at Orlando West Secondary School with the intention of participating in a peaceful march to the nearby Orlando Stadium. The demonstration had been planned in protest against the use of Afrikaans as the medium of instruction at schools.To help us unpack the topic we spoke to: • Mampe Ntsedi Project specialist at the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund• Omar Badsha Chief Executive Officer at the S.A History
6/6/201659 minutes, 41 seconds
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Africa waste

For the past three decades, poor African nations have been used as the dumping sites for hazardous toxic waste materials from developed countries. Primarily the international community are out to reduce the costs of disposing or recycling the by-products of their industries. E-waste is routinely exported by developed countries to developing ones often in violation of the international law. To help us interrogate this we are joined on the line by:• Rico Euripidou: An Environmental health campaigner at Groundwork • Howard Bulkin : Managing Director: The Waste Trade Company• Desmond d’ Sa: Spokesperson for the South Durban Environmental Alliance• Mark Gordon; The Deputy Director General : Chemicals and Waste Management
6/2/201657 minutes, 6 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
6/1/201659 minutes, 59 seconds
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Protests in South Africa

South Africa has been dubbed the protest capital of the world, with one of the highest rates of public protests in the world. Recently, this has been evident in the service delivery protests in Vuwani. The events began in the Limpopo province, where more than twenty schools were burned by citizens and Hamaanskraal, where protesting against land evictions took place, where two red ants’ members were killed. These events were nothing new to South Africa, as it was reported that there 540 protests in the province of Gauteng between 1 April and 10 May 2013. Speaking to presenter Benjamin Moshatama was: • Lizette Lancaster Manager: Crime and Justice Information Hub part of the Governance, Crime and Justice department at the Institute for Security Studies • Nomfundo Mogapi, Executive Director OF Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation • Levy Ndou, Political analyst at the Tshwane University of Technology
5/31/201659 minutes, 48 seconds
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HISSENE HABRE TRIAL

The verdict of the former dictator of Chad, Hissène Habré, is scheduled today in the Extraordinary African Chambers of the Court of Senegal. The trial is historic for many reasons. It will be the first in which the court of one state prosecutes the former ruler of another for alleged human rights crimes. Habré, who was in power from June 1982 to December 1990, stands accused, among other things, of committing numerous crimes against humanity and war crimes against his political opponents.To look at the trial, presenter Benjamin Moshatama spoke to: • Dr Marie Gibert: South African Institute of International Affairs • Allan Ngari: Institute of Security Studies In South Africa
5/30/201659 minutes, 59 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
5/26/201656 minutes, 48 seconds
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Infrastructure in Africa

Next month, the fifth Infrastructure Africa Business Forum will be held in South Africa. The Forum will involve delegates from government, the infrastructure industry and developmental agencies to discuss how to accelerate the business of infrastructure on the continent. • Nigel Gwynne-Evans Chief Director: African Industrial Development in South Africa’s Department of Trade and Industry• Duncan Bonnett Director: Africa House, a partner at specialist Africa-focused consulting firm, Africa House
5/24/20161 hour, 39 seconds
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African Renaissance

The 6th Africa Unity for Renaissance Conference got underway yesterday at the University of South Africa campus in Pretoria. The theme is: The Knowledge, Spiritual and Struggle Heritage for Re-imagining Innovative Africa”. According to the organizers, the conference aims to debunk the negative narrative that Africans have made no substantial contribution to science, knowledge, history and civilisation.To assist us on this subject we are joined by :• Baba Buntu: Executive Director Ebukhosini Solutions • Prof Mammo MuchIe: Research Chair in Innovation Studies: Faculty of Economics and Finance: Tshwane University of Technology • Dr Palesa Sekhejane : Research Specialist :DEPARTMENT: African Institute of South Africa
5/23/201654 minutes, 9 seconds
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AIR POLLUTION IN AFRICA’S URBAN AREAS

The World Health Organisation has released data that shows that more than 1 billion people live in countries that do not monitor the air they breathe. This is a cause for concern as outdoor air pollution kills up to 3.3 million people each year and the trend is not changing. According to analysis poverty is connected to air pollution in countries, as of the world’s poorest 50 countries by GDP per capita, 35 are not monitoring air in any of their cities.To assist us on this subject we are joined by :• Prof Eugene Cairncross (a chemical engineer who has lots of experience in issues of air quality) • Robyn Hugo, Attorney and Programme Head: Pollution & Climate Change Centre for Environmental Rights• Dr Rebecca Garland,Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Professor Harold Annergarn An air pollution expert based in Cape Town
5/19/201656 minutes, 50 seconds
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Brazil President impeachment

After months of speculation, mudslinging and debate, the embattled Brazilian President's fate is now in the hands of her country's Senate, which is scheduled to vote on whether impeachment proceedings against her should begin. If a simple majority votes for the motion, Dilma Rousseff will be forced to leave the country's presidential palace for 180 days and face an impeachment trial. It's not looking good for the once-popular Brazilian leader, who now faces allegations that she broke budget laws. To help us discuss this matter we are now joined on the line by: • Tom Wheeler Research associate at the South African Institute for International Affairs • Andre Thomas-Haussen: Political Science and Law Expert at the University of South Africa
5/18/201656 minutes, 16 seconds
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DROUGHT SOUTHERN AFRICA

The Water Institute of Southern Africa (WISA) is hosting an international conference and exhibition on water. Established in the 1950’s, the WISA conference has grown to become the largest of its kind in Southern Africa, detailing issues inherently faced by the area’s population. The event attracts around 2 thousand delegates, from the water sector of Southern Africa, as well as international delegates from countries such as the Netherlands, Danish, Germany, China and Australia, including engineers, municipalities, water industry stakeholders and the like. This year, organisers expect this number to grow exponentially, as the need for water solutions grows. To help us unpack this conference with a theme” The Ultimate Constraints”, we are joined on the line by: • Dr Valerie Naidoo – Board Chair of the Water Institute of Southern Africa : Board Chair • Dr Mark O’Donohue – CEO of the Australian Water Recycling Centre of Excellence.
5/17/201656 minutes, 57 seconds
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Broadcasting content

South Africa’s public broadcaster said last week at least 90% of music played at the SABC’s 18 radio stations will from Thursday comprise of local music in a bid to prioritise homegrown content.SABC spokesperson Kaizer Kganyago said that this came after consultations with local music. This was celebrated by many on social media but there were those who questioned the move, asking questions about whether the industry would be able to maintain such a mandate. To look at this question we are joined by: • Nomvuyiso Batyi, counsellor from ICASA • Raymond Louw from the Media Institute of Southern Africa
5/16/201659 minutes, 52 seconds
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WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM

Africa’s positive economic outlook is under pressure mainly due to adverse changes in the global economy, and is expected to remain just below 5 per cent this year. As many countries in the region improve their investment climate and undertake macroeconomic policy reforms, foreign direct investment flows are expected to continue to grow, although at a slower pace. This is one of the pertinent issues that came under the spotlight during preliminary sessions of the World Economic Forum being held in Kigali, Rwanda. It is the 3rd time that the African continent hosts a summit of this magnitude. The first was held in Nigeria, then South Africa and now Rwanda. The theme of this is “Connecting Africa’s Resources through Digital Transformation,”. To help us understand the issues to be discussed from today until Sunday, we are joined on the line by:Sylvanus Karamera: Channel Africa: Correspondent based in Kigali, Rwanda: Paul Boynton: Chief Executive Officer: Alternative Investments from Old Mutual: Pieter Laubsher: Chief Economist: Bureau for Economic Research: Amanda Fitchen : Department of Economics at the Univrsity of South Africa:
5/12/201659 minutes, 33 seconds
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Nuclear and Radiation Protection

The 14th conference of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) got underway in Cape Town, in a first for the continent. The conference has seen around 900 delegates from 72 countries participating on the event. Delegates heard yesterday that South Africa’s nuclear procurement process is on track. But the announcement came with reminders of the 2011 Fukushima disaster and calls to ensure that preventative measures take centre stage.To chat to us about this we are now joined on the line by:Shane Malepa: Managing Director of Malepa Holdings Renate Czarwinskiuuy: German and President of the conference: She is also Head of Section, Safety and Security of sources.
5/11/201659 minutes, 18 seconds
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OPEN PARLIAMENT PROGRAMME

How do you ensure that there is openness between governments, communities and civil society? That is the big question that is being adressed at the Open Government Partnership conference (OGP), which was held last week at the Century City Conference Centre in Cape Town, South Africa. The conference, hosted in Africa Month, brings together delegates from across the continent and the world to discuss how to create open governments for Africa's sustainable development. To discuss the gathering we are now joined by...... :1. Dr Bishop Thabile Mnisi Msibi President Restoration MSCARE2. Ms Qinisile Delwa Chief Director Department of Public Service and Administration3. Ms Casandra Makhubela Secretary General South African Congress of Non-Profit Organisation
5/10/20161 hour, 9 seconds
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Tourism Indaba

Hundreds of exhibitors from across Africa are showcasing what they have to offer in their tourism sectors at the Tourism Indaba in Durban. Some countries that are thriving in tourism such as Mozambique, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zimbabwe and Kenya are in attendance. South Africa's Minister of Tourism, Derek Hanekom says when tourism succeeds, Africa will succeed. He says African countries need to take advantage of their authentic and meaningful experiences to help grow tourism on the continent for the benefit of its people. He was speaking during the official opening of INDABA; the annual tourism trade show organized by South Africa Tourism, taking place in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa. The Indaba ends on Monday.To help us unpack what really took place at the summit we are joined on the line by: 1. KwakeDonkor Marketing Director RETOSA (Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa)2. Michael Mabuyakhulu MEC Economic Development and Environmental Affairs3. KgomotsoPooe Founder Soweto Outdoor Adventures
5/9/201655 minutes, 55 seconds
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PAN AFRICAN PARLIAMENT

The second ordinary session of the Fourth Parliament of the Pan-African Parliament that officially commenced on Tuesday and will run the 13th May. One of the most significant changes for Parliament was the establishment of an entirely new House of Parliament, the National Council of Provinces, to ensure that provincial interests are taken into account in the national sphere of government. During the term of the 3rd Parliament the demand on members of Parliament to engage in oversight activities and participate in international organisations, events and forums increased. And this morning we will be looking at what we can expect from the 4th Parliament of the Pan-African Parliament, and to help us discuss this is:Hon. Dr Bernadette Lahai: 4th Vice President of Pan-African Parliament (from Sierra Leone) Hon. Jacqueline Muhongayire – MP from RwandaHon. Hashim Osman – MP from Sudan
5/5/201657 minutes, 5 seconds
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Broadcazsting and social media

Social media has offered international broadcasters unprecedented chances to reach out to more audiences abroad and also new target groups, like young people and women. They create new research tools for journalists as well as provide alternative information sources to news agencies and the possibility to explore new programming formats. But there are still challenges facing this sharing of information. An example of a challenge for International Broadcasters is still restrictions on the free exchange of information. But on the whole social media are playing an increasingly important role especially in the coverage of events and developments in crisis regions. An example is how the Arab spring unfolded. To help us understand how social media has transformed radio broadcasting internationally, as we celebrate Channel Africa’s 5oth anniversary, we are joined on the line by:Mathata Tsedu: Adjunct Professor of Journalism at the University of the WitwatersrandIsaac Khomo: Channel Africa’s Senior News JournalistYavi Madurai: A social media expert from Black Box Theory
5/3/201658 minutes, 40 seconds
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AUTISM

The world was acknowledging World Austism Awareness month, with the United Nations General Assembly declaring April 2 as International World Awareness Day. Austism is a lifelong developmental disability, which is developed in the first three years of life.Austism is a mental condition, present from early childhood, characterized by great difficulty in communicating and forming relationships with other people and in using language and abstract concepts.To assist us on this matter we are joined by: • Vicky Lamb, Autism South Africa'sNational Education Facilitator, • Akil Seema, Academy Manager of the Star Academy
4/28/20161 hour, 10 seconds
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SOUTHERN SUDAN

The United States blamed South Sudan's government for the latest hold-up in efforts to end its civil war, but warned both sides the world will not tolerate backsliding. Rebel leader Riek Machar had been due to fly to Juba from Ethiopia on Saturday to join a transitional government, but President Salva Kiir's government blocked his flight. He was again to show up for a peace meeting on Monday, but that also failed to materialise. This marks the third time this week that plans for Machar to return have been frustrated by one side or the other. The United Nations Security Council was due to meet on today to discuss the crisis and that both sides could face additional international sanctions. To discuss this matter further we are joined on the line by:His Excellency Philip Jada Natana: Sudan Ambassador to South AfricaProfessor Fanie Vermaak: Ancient Near Eastern Studies at the University of South AfricaNyagoah Tut: Amnesty International campaigner in South Sudan based in Nairobi Kenya
4/26/201658 minutes, 36 seconds
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Mining Charter Controversy

The latest draft of South Africa’s Mining Charter demands a perpetual minimum 26% black ownership per mining right. The country’s mineral resources minister Mosebenzi Zwane announced that consultation on the draft mining charter may be extended beyond 30 days if it is required. Local reports indicate that the mining industry has been divided on the matter, especially on the stipulation of the percentage of mining rights being in black hands. To assist us on this matter we are joined by: • Ross Harvey, Senior Researcher Programme: Governance of Africa's Resources Programme of South African Institute of International Affairs• Prof Brian Kantor, an economic advisor • Robert Krause, researcher of Environmental Justice department at the Centre for Applied for Legal Studies at the University of Wits.
4/25/201659 minutes, 15 seconds
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PYRAMID SCHEMES

In the recent past we have been hearing about Pyramid Schemes and specifically one called MMM. We have seen news headlines saying the scheme had collapsed.Currently the MMM investment scheme is under investigation by the Hawks after it collapsed in Russia. The group has applied to the High Court in Pretoria for clarity on whether the donation based network is considered a Ponzi or pyramid scheme.To help us answer some of those questions we are joined by:1. Trevor Hattingh Spokesperson National Consumer Commission 2. Gerald Mwandiambira Chief Executive Officer South African Savings Institute 3. David Kop Head: Advocacy and Consumer Affairs Financial Planning Institute
4/21/201656 minutes, 50 seconds
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BRICS New Development Bank

Eskom is the first South African company to receive a major financial boost of 2.6 billion from the first set of loans approved by the New Development Bank. The new multilateral lender set up by Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa in February, has approved 11.7 billion rand for renewable energy projects in four of its member countries. The bank said South Africa’s loan would be used to build transmission lines to shift 670MW of electricity and to generate 500MW of renewable energy generation by independent power producers. The loans will run for 12 to 20 years, and more plans are at various stages of consideration in the Development Bank’s pipeline, including loans to Russia. To help us unpack this we are joined in studio by:PATRICK BOND: A political and economic analystCYRIL PRINSLOO: Researcher on the Economic Diplomacy Programme at the Institute for International Affairs:
4/20/201657 minutes, 51 seconds
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Regional intergration

The East African Community has been cited as the most integrated region in Africa. This is according to the Africa Regional Integration Index report which was launched at the beginning of April in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. This is the first initiative to be developed to measure the progress on regional integration in the continent. Africa has spent much of the past decade investing in physical infrastructure, but it must not forget the development of human capital, the report urges. Investing in education, particularly in science and technology, will bring about great gains for the citizens of the continent. To assist us on this topic we are now joined by:• Kudzanayi Bangure - Manager at the NBF's Africa Infrastructure Desk and he will focus on Africa's integration specifically focusing on integration through transport corridors. • Lesley Wentworth, She is the head of an initiative focused on SADC's integration and industrialisation call the Southern Africa Business Forum (SABF). • And Tralac researcher, William Mwanza
4/19/201659 minutes, 56 seconds
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20 years of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Friday 15th of April this year marked 20 years of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The TRC was a court-like body assembled in South Africa after the end of Apartheid. Anybody who felt they had been a victim of violence could come forward and be heard at the TRC. Perpetrators of violence could also give testimony and request amnesty from prosecution. The hearings made international news and many sessions were broadcast on national television. The TRC was a crucial component of the transition to full and free democracy in South Africa and, despite some flaws, is generally regarded as very successful. The TRC was set up in terms of the Promotion of National Unity and Reconciliation Act, No 34 of 1995, and was based in Cape Town. To help us look at this Commission, its success and failures, we are joined by: • Dr Marjorie Jobson: National Director: Khulekani Support Group• Catharine Kennedy: Director: The South African History Archive • Advocate Dumisa Ntsebenza: One of the 17 TRC Commissioners
4/18/201657 minutes, 19 seconds
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Africa taxation administration Forum

Tax experts from Africa and around the world are discussing the Taxation of Extractive Industries in Johannesburg, South Africa. The three day meeting which concludes today aims at providing an overview of the challenges facing the continent's tax systems in cross border exports in the extractive industry, including transfer pricing and natural resource contracts.The Forum on taxis also looking at the need to improve on the capacity, skill base, and address specific regional challenges faced by tax administrators. To look at the role of the African revenue authorities in ensuring that more revenue is mobilised to enable African governments meet their obligations, we are now joined on the line by:Mr Logan Wort: Executive Secretary of the African Tax Administration Forum.Mr Happias Kuzvinzwa: Commissioner for Domestic Taxes at the Zimbabwe Revenue AuthorityAnd Mr Boubaca Bocoum: Lead Mining Specialist from the World Bank.
4/13/201659 minutes, 34 seconds
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Yellow fever

The death toll from yellow fever outbreak in Angola has risen to 225, with an estimated 1,600cases now recorded, Angola’s Health Minister Luis Sambo said after meeting with World Health Organization officials that the disease had spread to 16 of the country’s 18 provinces. The virus has since spread to some other countries like DRC, Zambia and Namibia. To help us understand what really yellow fever is we have a panel of experts: 1. Dr Jacqueline Weyer National Institute of Communicable Diseases 2. Tarik Jasarevic World Health Organisation 3. Dr Tabeh Freeman Public Health Specialist 4. Dr Albie de frey Director Travel Doctors
4/11/201658 minutes, 57 seconds
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Agricultural research

The Global Conference on Agricultural Research for Development (GCARDpaved the way and set the tone on how the country’s agricultural industry can address some of the challenges affecting the SA from an agricultural and economic stand point.As South Africa struggles to deal with rising food prices, the ripple effects of the worst drought to hit the country in 20 years and issues of water shortage, leaders and agricultural experts from around the world gathered in South African shores for the GCARD conference in Johannesburg at the Birchwood Hotel between the 5th and the 8th of April 2016. To help us unpack what really took place at the summit we are joined on the line by: Mr Juan Lunas Restrepo Ibiza Chairperson CFARDr Robin Buruchara Pan African Bean Research AllianceJimmy Smith Director General International Live Stock Research Institute
4/7/201656 minutes, 57 seconds
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Jacob Zuma Impeachment 2

The motion to impeach South African President Jacob Zuma has failed.Results from the votes, suggested that those who voted for were 143, 233 against and no one abstained.Following the outcome of the votes, opposition parties, particularly those from the EFF, accused the ANC MPs of being sellouts, while others shouted “you are traitors”.The debate calling for Zuma’s removal in Parliament on Tuesday was concluded just after 6pm.This follows lengthy debates from opposition and ANC MPs.There was a rowdy start to the debate when EFF chief whip, Floyd Shivhambu called for Speaker of Parliament; BalekaMbete to recuse herself, pointing out that the Constitutional Court had found that the National Assembly had violated the Constitution.Other opposition MPs from the DA, Cope, ACDP and UDM also supported the calls for Mbete to excuse herself from the proceedings.To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by:1. Sanusha Naidu Academic and Research Specialist Institute for Global Dialogue 2. Levi Ndou Political Analyst Tshwane University of Technology 3. Sara Gon Policy fellow Institute of Race Relations
4/6/20161 hour, 17 seconds
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Jacob Zuma Impeachment

South African Members of Parliament are back to begin the second session of parliament after a two weeks' break. But a lot has happened in the meantime. The Constitutional Court has found that parliament had failed to carry out its duty to hold the executive to account regarding the Nkandla matter. So their first and only sitting for this week will include a debate on whether to remove the president from office. The Constitutional Court handed down judgment in the Nkandla case last week. It ruled that President Jacob Zuma has 45 days to pay back the money used on his private Nkandla home. The final figure will be determined by the National Treasury. In another development, on Friday night last week, President Jacob Zuma conceded that many matters could have been handled differently in the scandal over the estimated 246 million rand of taxpayer cash being spent on his Nkandla homestead‚ and apologised for the “frustration and confusion” this had caused. To help us discuss this we are joined on the line by: Levy Ndou Political Science at Tswane University of Technology. Ben Turok Former ANC Member of Parliament.South African Members of Parliament are back to begin the second session of parliament after a two weeks' break. But a lot has happened in the meantime. The Constitutional Court has found that parliament had failed to carry out its duty to hold the executive to account regarding the Nkandla matter. So their first and only sitting for this week will include a debate on whether to remove the president from office. The Constitutional Court handed down judgment in the Nkandla case last week. It ruled that President Jacob Zuma has 45 days to pay back the money used on his private Nkandla home. The final figure will be determined by the National Treasury. In another development, on Friday night last week, President Jacob Zuma conceded that many matters could have been handled differently in the scandal over the estimated 246 million rand of taxpayer cash being spent on his Nkandla homestead‚ and apologised for the “frustration and confusion” this had caused. To help us discuss this we are joined on the line by: Levy Ndou Political Science at Tswane University of Technology. Ben Turok Former ANC Member of Parliament.Marinus Vikkers Constitutional Expert .Marinus Vikkers Constitutional Expert .
4/5/201659 minutes, 10 seconds
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Gender, Peace and Security and launch of the UN Women Report Forum

Fifteen years ago, in October 2000, the United Nations Security Council adopted the historic resolution 1325 (2000), drawing attention to the differential impact of armed conflict on women, their exclusion from conflict prevention and resolution, peacekeeping and peace-building, and the inextricable links between gender equality and international peace and security. Since its adoption, insecurity and conflict has continued in all parts of the world, and in recent years, it is taking on new and increasingly challenging forms. It is against this backdrop that the Gender, Peace and Security Workshop and UN Women Report Launch held on Thursday last week. To chat to us more about this event we are joined on the line by: GUESTSMolly Dlamini: Manager of External Stakeholder Relations (SALO) Loveness Nyakujarah: Specialist on Women, Peace and Security (UN Women) Anne Githuku-Shongwe who is the Representative for UN Women South Africa Multi-Country Office (which means she is the head of office).Showers Mawowa Research Development Co-Ordinator (SALO)
4/4/201657 minutes, 16 seconds
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Skills and jobs Summit

More than 500 delegates including Senior Government officials, top private sector leaders and key players of non-governmental organisations have met to deliberate on how all the country’s social partners can work together to accelerate the supply of skills specifically in critical sectors and raise South Africa’s economic growth in order to reduce the three social ills of unemployment, poverty and inequality. South African Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa officially opened the gathering and called for the expansion of South Africa’s skills base to ensure that people benefit from the country’s natural resources, create more jobs and boost the ailing economy.To help us unpack what really took place at the summit we are joined on the line by: 1. Mr Ravi Naidoo Member of the Council2. Mr SobantuTilayi Representative of the Implementation Agency3. Mr David Mabusela Chief Director: Artisan Development - DHET
3/31/201649 minutes
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Terror Analysis

With the recent terrorist attacks in Pakistan and Brussels, the international community is starting to ask questions regarding security and the topic of counter terrorism is now becoming central in the conversation how to deal with terrorist groups. Pakistan has reported to have detained more than 200 people for questioning since the Easter Sunday bombings that killed at least 72 people in Lahore. Menawhile after Brussels terrorism attacks, French President Francois Hollande said that 3,000 additional people have been hired by private security firms to ensure safety at the European Championship soccer tournament in June.To assist us on this subject: • Jasmine Opperman, the Africa Director of terrorism research and analysis consortium • Ryan Cummings, Director of Signal Risk, • Naeem Geena, Executive Director of Afro-Middle East Centre,
3/30/201656 minutes, 45 seconds
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US Cuba Relations

President Obama visited Cuba for a historic three-day visit last week, becoming the first sitting US president to visit the island in 88 years. He has held meetings with Cuban President Raúl Castro at the Palace of the Revolution in Havana. While diplomatic ties have been restored between the two countries, many issues remain unsolved. The 54-year-old US trade embargo on Cuba remains in place. The United States has also refused to give up control of its Navy base and military prison at Guantánamo Bay in Cuba. To help us unpack this historic visit, we are now joined on the line by:Brook Spector: Associate Editor and US Foreign Policy Expert at the Daily MaverickRob Miller Director : Cuba Solidarity Campaign based in London
3/29/201657 minutes, 44 seconds
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Coal versus renewable

The 17th of March 2016 saw the Fossil Fuel Foundation in South Africa hosting an “Independent Power Generation One day Conference” at the Glenhove Conference Centre in Rosebank Johannesburg. On the agenda the Independent Power Production discussed coal and the IPP programme.  South Africa’s coal mining industry is on the decline and yet one day conferences are still being held by the Fossil Fuel Foundation together with government and individuals with vested interests in coal and energy to discuss the future of a sector that over the last three years has shed up to 47,000 jobs. With 60% of the country’s deposits located in Witbank, which has the dirtiest air in the world, Mpumalanga will still be home to Kusile the world’s largest coal mine, burning 17million tons of coal a year.  In addition South Africa’s carbon emissions will increase by another 10%, ensuring the country’s spot as one of the world’s highest contributor to climate change. That’s the question being asked by a group called 350Africa  which wants to see more renewable energy taking the place of coal produced energy. To help us debate the issue, we have :Professor Rosemary Falcon from the School of Chemical and Metallurgical EngineeringRob Jefferry Managing Director and Senior Economist at EconometrixAmir Bagheri from 350Africa a Break free CampaignerParbu Pathanjali A Greenpeace Climate and Energy Camaigner
3/23/201656 minutes, 15 seconds
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ANC State capture

The African National Congress National Executive Committee met over the week-end over a controversy engulfing the government, that one top official said is threatening to turn South Africa into a “mafia state.” For an example, Finance Minister, Pravin Gordhan, is engaged in a public spat with the police over their investigation into the national tax agency, a probe president Jacob Zuma has backed. And just recently, the Deputy of Finance, two former ministers, a former ANC MP, dropped bombshells saying they were offered cabinet posts by the powerful Gupta family. To look at the outcomes of the ANC National Executive Council over the week-end, we are joined on the line by:Dr Somadoda Fikeni: Independent Political AnalystYavi Madurai: Social Media Analyst
3/22/201656 minutes, 11 seconds
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Moody's Rating in South Africa

Chief Economist at Pan African Investment and Research, Dr Iraj Abedian says Moody’s will not downgrade South Africa’s economy to junk status. Following Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan's charm offensive in London, Boston and New York, ratings agency Moody's is in SA to assess whether the country is able to tackle its economic challenges. The finance ministry undertook a road show last week, trying to convince international investors that a further downgrade would not be in the country's favor. Dr Abedian says if the country’s economy is to be downgraded, it is going to affect everyone, particularly the poor and the middle class. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by:• Azwimpheleli Langalanga: Research Associate: Economic Diplomacy Program: South African Institute of International Affairs• Gerhard van Onselen: Economic Researcher: Solidarity Movement • Azar Jammine, Chief Economist at Econometrix
3/17/201657 minutes, 38 seconds
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IT LEADERS CONFERENCE

Wednesday the 16th of March saw the 2nd and final day of the IT Leaders Africa Summit taking place at Vodacom World near Johannesburg in South Africa. The two-day event offers meeting place for IT and business leaders to discuss the latest and greatest in key insights, technologies and trends, and ensure that all walk away with hands-on knowledge of the world around them. To help us find out more about the event, we have :Thomas Nel Sale Director for the Sub Saharan Region for CommspaceAbdul Baba CIO for SkynetCaun Kloppers CIO for Samancor Chrome Limited
3/16/201656 minutes, 44 seconds
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The Mbeki letters

Former South African President has been writing a series of open letters explaining and detailing some of the decisions he has made during his tenure as state President. In his letters Mbeki talks about a vast range of issues that include the plot that led to his dismissal as the president. In recent days he has also written on and about his stance on HIV/Aids and his policy. He however has received a lot of criticism from the health community and some saying his has no remorse for all the lives lost during his presidency.To assist us on this subject: Prof Tinyiko Maluleke Political Analyst Dr Somadoda Fikeni Political Analyst
3/15/201658 minutes, 51 seconds
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THE MBEKI LETTERS

Former South African President has been writing a series of open letters explaining and detailing some of the decisions he has made during his tenure as state President. In his letters Mbeki talks about a vast range of issues that include the plot that led to his dismissal as the president. In recent days he has also written on and about his stance on HIV/Aids and his policy. He however has received a lot of criticism from the health community and some saying his has no remorse for all the lives lost during his presidency.To assist us on this subject: Prof Tinyiko Maluleke Political Analyst Dr Somadoda Fikeni Political Analyst
3/15/201658 minutes, 51 seconds
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NIgeria

South African President Jacob Zuma on Tuesday last week announced that as part of efforts to strengthen relations with key trading partner Nigeria, he and his counterpart, Muhammadi Buhari, have decided to elevate the Bi-National Commission between the two countries to the level of Heads of State. Zuma was on a two-day state visit to Nigeria and was being accompanied by various ministers, as well as a business delegation. Zuma said both countries were committed to creating an enabling environment to ease the manner of doing business and added that he and Buhari had also exchanged views on the current regional political, economic and security situation. To help us unpack his visit to Nigeria, we are now joined on the line by:Jason Osuafor: Former President Nigeria Union Africa: Emeka Johnson: Africa Diaspora Forum: Faith Mabera: Researcher at the Institute of Global Dialogue:
3/14/201655 minutes, 46 seconds
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THE COST OF DROUGHT

Thousands of herds of livestock have been lost across the continent as a result of the on-going dry spell. Agricultural communities are still struggling to stay afloat as severe drought led to record livestock and crop losses. Agricultural experts warn that food prices are set to rise substantially as low local production will soon struggle to meet demands. The price of meat has shot up while the brand of the drought is felt by the farmers at the ground level.To help to unpack this global crisis we have on the line:……1. Gerhard Skitter CEO National Red Meat Producers Organisation2. Thabi Nkosi Senior Economist Agri-SA3. James Jenkinson Chairman South African Pork Producers Organisation
3/10/201656 minutes, 48 seconds
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Youth Work

The Commonwealth Secretariat in partnership with the Republic of South Africa, the National Youth Development Agency, of South Africa and the University of South Africa, are holding the Second Commonwealth Conference on Youth Work. The Conference will address a range of issues critical to the enhancement of the profession, with papers from academics, practitioners and, importantly, young people, who are the receivers of youth work services. Plenary speakers will include leading figures in the youth work community. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by:KATHERINE ELLIS: Director, Youth Division, at The Commonwealth Secretariat Mr YERSHEN PILLAY: Executive Chairperson of the National Youth Development AgencyPROFESSOR VERONICA McKAY: Dean of the College of Education at the University of South Africa
3/9/201659 minutes, 12 seconds
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International Women’s Day

Today is International Women’s Day. The UN has declared that the theme this year is “Planet 50-50 by 2030, Step It Up for Gender Equality”. With the theme this year, the focus will look at fast tracking the momentum of the implementation of the new sustainable goals. The focus this year will be not only look at equality for women, but also will look at how to empower young girls in areas such as inclusive and quality education and protection of their rights. To assist us on this day we have: • Loveness Nyakujarah, A representative with United Nations Women• Director of the Women’s Legal Centre, Hoodah Abrahams-Fayker• Seynabou Tall, the regional gender and Gender based violence adviser United National Population Fund for East and Southern Africa Regional • Dr Janet Rodgers, Africa Diaspora Forum Women’s League
3/8/201656 minutes, 10 seconds
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Zika Virus

Recently the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared a disease linked to the Zika Virus as a global public health emergency. Zika is carried by mosquitoes and has been linked to thousands of babies being born with underdeveloped brains. The World Health Organization declaring a health emergency means that its 194 member states must now work together to investigate the cause of the problem. This is fourth emergency to be declared since the system was established in 2005. African Dialogue’s Benjamin Moshatama spoke Professor Lucille Bloomberg, National Institute for Communicable Diseases’ Deputy-Director, Head of Division, and Head of Travel Health, Dr Sarah Barber, World Health Organisation representative based in South Africa and Dr Thomas Nyirenda: South-South Networking and Capacity Development Manager at the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership.
3/7/201658 minutes, 58 seconds
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South African Economy

South Africa has been experiencing disappointing economic growth last year, with an economy which only expanded 0.6 percent in the final quarter. In the last few weeks, Credit rating agenneis have said the country is at risk of a downgrade into a credit rating of junk status. The rand nevertheless rose 1 percent against the dollar, tracking other emerging market currencies higher as uncertainty over the pace of further U.S. interest rate hikes tempers the dollar's momentum.To assist us on this subject: SPII Director Isobel Frye studio. She is currently heading the Decent Living Level Project at the Studies in Poverty and Inequality Institute.Annabel Bishop, Chief Economist at Investec,
3/3/201658 minutes, 55 seconds
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Sahel Security

Washington is proposing $200 million in new military spending for North and West Africa. Both the United States and France, which has 3,500 troops in the region, intend to boost support to regional security body Group of Five Sahel. It is speculated the United States and Senegal had agreed a new accord granting rights to establish a base in case of an emergency.To assist us on this subject: Ebrahim Deen, Researcher (Afro-Middle East Centre) Dr Sylvester Bongani Maphosa, Chief Research Specialist: Governance and Security programme.
3/2/201656 minutes, 5 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
3/1/201656 minutes, 17 seconds
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REFUGEES IN MALAWI

Resumption of armed hostilities between Mozambican government forces and Renamo in the Tete province erupted two weeks ago, displacing hundreds, some of whom fled to Malawi’s Mwazana district. The clashes erupted not long after Mozambican President Felipe Nyusi encouraged Renamo militants to lay down their arms to be reintegrated into Mozambican society, as well as into the Mozambican military or reserves. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by:• Egidio Guilherme Vaz Raposo Researcher based in Maputo: • • Martin Mlelemba, journalist in Malawi,
2/29/201656 minutes, 43 seconds
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Burundi political crisis

Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo are urging the UN Security Council to take action against Rwanda, which they accuse of recruiting refugees to oust the Bujumbura government. Rwanda has repeatedly denied claims that it was arming Burundian refugees in a bid to overthrown President Pierre Nkurunziza, whose re-election has plunged his country in turmoil. Channel Africa presenter Benjamin Moshatama spoke to Yolande Bouka: Senior Research Associate: Conflict Prevention And Risk Analysis: Institute for Security Studies and Channel Africa journalist Isaak Khomo.
2/24/201658 minutes, 15 seconds
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Mining job loses

The South African mining sector cut 47,000 jobs between 2012 and early 2015 as the industry grappled with soaring costs and low commodity prices. Mining costs had increased by an average 20% a year for the past five years and electricity was the core component in those cost increases. At prevailing prices, about 80% of the platinum industry was loss-making, while in coal and iron ore about half of production was under water. The presenter spoke to Ross Harvey senior researcher of South African Institute of International Affair, spokesperson from the Chamber of Mines Charmane Russell and Oxfam’s Ronald Wesso.
2/23/201657 minutes, 27 seconds
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Uganda Elections

Uganda's electoral commission has declared incumbent President Yoweri Museveni the winner of the country's 2016 elections. Museveni won with 60.7% of the votes while his closest competitor, opposition leader Kizza Besigye, had 35.3. Museveni has been in office since his rebel group seized power in 1986. Our panel today included” Toni Singoro: Channel Africa News Correspondent based in Kampala, Uganda, Emeka Johnson head of communication from the African Diaspora Forum, Maria Burnett, senior Human Rights Watch Researcher based in Kampala and Israel Mkhize who is a political commentator on African issues.
2/22/201657 minutes, 35 seconds
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International Mother Language Day

The United Nations' (UN) International Mother Language Day annually celebrates language diversity and variety worldwide on February 21. It also remembers events such as the killing of four students on February 21, 1952, because they campaigned to officially use their mother language, Bengali, in Bangladesh. So today we look at whether there is still space for mother language in this forever changing world, be it professionally or socially. African Dialogue’s Benjamin Moshatama spoke toDr Thabo Ditsele senior lecturer at Tshwane University of Technology’s Department of Applied Languages, Ms Ntsiki Mazwai a Poet & Activist and Carrien Bloem, the project coordinator at Afri-Forum.
2/18/201657 minutes, 7 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
2/17/201657 minutes, 56 seconds
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Africa Energy Indaba

The Africa Energy Indaba is a continental event which brings together global and regional energy industry experts on the continent together to discuss on how opportunities in the industry can be unlocked. The eighth annual event focuses on the energy sector in a difficult environment in the economy where there is a sharp decline in the demand of mineral commodities, mines are closing down and a shortage of electricity. The Africa Energy Indaba should present alternatives on how the continent can survive the current challenges to steer the industry forward. Journalist Benjamin Moshatama spoke to Scott Brodsky, a partner at energy law firm Macfarlanes and Paul Runge, the Managing Director of MANAGING Africa Project Access.
2/16/201658 minutes, 11 seconds
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World Radio Day

February 13 was World Radio Day, which celebrates radio as a way of educating people, providing information, and promoting freedom of expression across cultures. Each year the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) celebrates World Radio Day by planning activities with broadcasters, organizations and communities around the world. This year their theme is “Radio in times of emergency and disaster”. Radio has played a significant role in terms of emergency and disaster. In keeping with the our Channel Africa 50 year celebration we are joined by our very own senior reporters who have been covering a number of war zones and emergency situations; Ephraim “Bra Charlie” Khumalo and Jenine Coetzer.
2/15/201659 minutes, 37 seconds
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State of the Nation Address (SONA) preview

The Economic Freedom Fighters might steal yet again steal South African President Jacob Zuma's spotlight when he addresses the country during his State of the Nation Address. The EFF has said it will push for Zuma's impeachment after the Constitutional Court's judgement on the Nkandla saga. Earlier this week the Constitutional court heard the case regarding Zuma's paying back monies spent for non - security upgrades at his private residence of Nkandla in the KwaZulu Natal province. The South African Police Services announced that it has beefed up security in parliament ahead of the SONA, while the National Assembly has announced that there won't be any point of orders during the president's address. Zuma is expected to address issues on the economy and social cohesion among others. The focus on Economic growth will also be necessary to prevent international rating agencies downgrading South Africa's sovereign rating to junk status, to create jobs and to attain all the government's big strategic goals. To help to unpack this we have on the line:Professor Daryl Glaser Head: Wits Department of Political Studies. Professor Jannie Rossouw, Head of the economic and business sciences school
2/11/201655 minutes, 53 seconds
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Nkandla Constitution Court case

The Constitutional court has reserved judgment on the EFF and DA's application that President Zuma be ordered to pay back some of the money spent on Nkandla. The court justices questioned whether they should compel Parliament to hold the president accountable to the Public Protector following her findings in the Nkandla report. Zuma has proposed that the auditor general and national treasury arrange a calculation of how much of the R246m spent on non-security upgrades he should pay back.But public protector Thuli Madonsela said that only she could decide whether to change her conclusions, and until that is done, Zuma had to abide by what she ordered.To help to unpack this we have on the line: Professor Tinyiko Maluleke, political commentator, Phephelaphi Dube, legal advisor at the Centre for Constitutional Rights Constitutional and Public law expert, Marinus Wiechers
2/10/201657 minutes
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Mining Indaba

The 22nd Mining Indaba is currently underway in the mother city Cape Town under the theme, “Investing in Africa”. The event is an annual professional conference dedicated to the capitalisation and development of mining interests in Africa and it’s the world’s largest mining investment event. The event offers mining houses and governments to share insight into how the sector can drive investment and capitalise on the opportunities available to Africa’s mining sector. To help to unpack this global crisis we have on the line:……1. Deputy Minister Godfrey OlophantDeputy Minister Department of Mineral Resources RSA2. Ross HarveySenior Researcher South African Institute of International Affairs
2/9/201657 minutes, 3 seconds
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DEFAMATION

The Constitutional Court in Zimbawe passed a landmark judgment in which it declared that criminal defamation must be struck off the statutes because it was not a justifiable law in a democratic society.MISA Zimbabwe reiterates that criminal defamation and any other laws that criminalise expression are an affront to freedom of expression and media freedom as protected by the new Constitution, and should be immediately struck off the country’s statutes.TO help us take this discussion further we are joined on the line by:……1. AdvSabeloSibandaLawyer in Zimbabwe
2/8/201655 minutes, 11 seconds
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Zika Virus

Recently the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared a disease linked to the Zika Virus as a global public health emergency. Zika is carried by mosquitoes and has been linked to thousands of babies being born with underdeveloped brains. The World Health Organization declaring a health emergency means that its 194 member states must now work together to investigate the cause of the problem. This is fourth emergency to be declared since the system was established in 2005. African Dialogue’s Benjamin Moshatama spoke Professor Lucille Bloomberg, National Institute for Communicable Diseases’ Deputy-Director, Head of Division, and Head of Travel Health, Dr Sarah Barber, World Health Organisation representative based in South Africa and Dr Thomas Nyirenda: South-South Networking and Capacity Development Manager at the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership.
2/4/20161 hour, 7 seconds
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SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Social Entrepreneurship seems to be a growing trend in the business sector. Attendees at the Pan African Social Entrepreneurship that was held at the Gordon Institute of Business science that was organised by Mail and Guardian got the opportunity to spend a day with leading thinkers in the social enterprise field. Entrepreneurs were given network opportunities and education on how to be a successful entrepreneur and how to get funding. But today we want to unpack really what really is this phenomenon called Social Entrepreneurship? What exactly happens in it? To help us answer those questions we are joined by:……1. Kerryn Krige : Senior Programs Manager Gordon Institute of Business Science 2. Tendai Mashingaidze Team Leader Muzinda Hub: Zimbabwe3. Andy Hadfield CEO Forgood4. Neil Robinson CEO Relate Bracelets
2/3/201657 minutes, 58 seconds
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AU Burundi

The African Union has failed this past weekend in its plan to send 5,000 peacekeepers to help restore stability to troubled Burundi. Instead the pan-African bloc said it would send an envoy into the country for more talks, despite failure in previous engagements in order to end the conflict. The United Nations has estimated that over 400 people have died and over 200 000 have fled since last April. The UN has also warned that Burundi risks a repeat of the 1993 – 2006 civil war. African Dialogue presenter Benjamin Moshatama spoke to Dr Webster Zambara, senior project leader at the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Liesl Louw-Vauldran journalist and Africa analyst and Carina Tertsakian Senior Researcher of the Africa division at Human Rights Watch.
2/2/201658 minutes, 27 seconds
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FOOD SECURITY

South Africa amongst other SADC countries is forced to import maize as drought and soaring temperature levels have destroyed crops. South Africa will need to import about 934 000 tons of yellow maize worth 137 million US dollars from countries like Argentina and Ukraine. The drought has damaged crops in the Free State and North West, which comprised 64% of output in 2014. The local price of white maize has risen 27% in Johannesburg this year and that of yellow maize, used mainly as animal feed, by 13%. Late rains at the end of February were not enough to salvage crops as most had already been pollinated. African Dialogue host Benjamin Moshatama spoke to a panel including Wandile SihloboEconomist Grain-S.A, Ishmael Sunga Chief Executive Officer Southern African Confederation of Agricultural Unions (SACAU)and Daniel Mclaren, senior Researcher Studies in Poverty and Inequality institute
2/1/201656 minutes, 21 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
1/28/201643 minutes, 46 seconds
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eSports

eSports is becoming serious business and is beginning to take off on the continent, with major sponsors who are now starting to take interest in the sport. To show that eSports is growing phenomenon is that there are now more federations and association established to organise the sport, with the latest being the Ghanaian eSports Association. Ghana joins South Africa, Namibia, Egypt and Zimbabwe, who are now part of the international and national eSports federations. We are joined by: • Colin Webster, General Secretary of Mind Sports South Africa • Morizane Boyez, teacher, coach and gamer extraordinaire,
1/27/20161 hour, 16 seconds
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National Health Insurance White Paper

The NHI white paper was released by South African health Minister Dr Aaron Motsoaledi last month. It says the NHIwould be a state-administered fund that paid for all health-care. This could lead to the demise of most medical aid schemes.It estimates that R108-billion a year, on top of the existing health budget of about R146-billion, would be needed from 2026.This is based on a projected 2% growth of the economy.According to the Free Market Foundation, the implementation of NHI would drive healthcare workers from the country, and create a huge and expensive new government bureaucracy.To help to unpack this global crisis we have on the line:1. Dr Bobby Ramasia Principal Executive Officer Bonitas Medical Aid Fund 2. Sasha Stevenson Attorney Section 27: Public interest law centre3. JassonUrbach Health Unit Director Free Market Foundation
1/21/201658 minutes, 6 seconds
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Southern African drought

The United Nations says that the Southern Africa’s drought has left up to 14 millions of people in the region hungry. The UN’S World Food Programme says that the drought caused by the El Nino weather pattern will increase the number of people without food this year, as the situation has been estimated to worsen in the region. The worst affected countries in the region by poor rains have been Malawi, Madagascar and Zimbabwe. Lesotho has declared a drought emergency while South Africa have declared five provinces in the country as disaster areas. To assist us on this subject we have: • David Orr, Communications Officer for Southern Africa at the United Nations World Food Programme in Johannesburg South Africa • Dr Everisto Mapedza: Senior Researcher – Social and Institutional Scientist (International Water Management Institute for Southern Africa- IWMI-SA) • Dr Jonathan Lautze: Senior Researcher (Water Resources Management) (International Water Management Institute for Southern Africa- IWMI-SA)
1/20/201659 minutes, 15 seconds
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Nigeria

President Muhammadu Buhari has declared that his administration will make tough decisions in the 2016 fiscal year. He, however, said that this does not necessarily mean increasing the level of pain already being experienced by most Nigerians. Buhari said this while presenting the 2016 budget to the National Assembly. The president said in spite of the global economic uncertainties, the government must remain steadfast in her commitment to steering Nigeria back to greatnessTo help us track where the President and his new cabinet are, we are now joined on the line by:Martin Rupiya: College of Graduate Studies; Institute for African Renaissance Studies at Unisa.Terna Agor: An Abuja based lawyer with several years of legal practice & engagement in public policy, democracy & democratization: Netsanet Belay: Africa Director, Research and Advocacy Amnesty International
1/19/20161 hour, 50 seconds
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Zimbabwe

Following reports that ousted former Zanu PF and Vice President of Zimbabwe Joyce Mujuru could be launching her new political party soon, hope has been restored for the disgruntled both in the opposition and ruling Zanu PF. For a long time since her ouster from the ruling party Joice Mujuru has been linked to the People First movement, an opposition born out of the ruling Zanu PF. Those who awaited the launch of the new party learnt that an interim leadership was now in place to spearhead the launch of the new party. Meanwhile Zimbabwean youths say their political involvement and the social media would decide who rules Zimbabwe next after the 2018 polls. To assist us on this program we are joined by: • Dr Ibbo Mandaza, politician, academic and businessman who is also the director of a local think-tank Sapes Trust.• Professor Sabelo Ndlovu-Gatseni, Archie Mafeje Research Institute, • Dr Webster Zambara,
1/18/201656 minutes, 11 seconds
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AGOA

US President announced that the suspension of duty-free treatment to all AGOA eligible goods in the agriculture sector, extending the deadline for South Africa to comply with US import of poultry and other meats. In a statement released yesterday South Africa’s department of trade and industry saying that the country will abide to the conditions of the African Growth and Opportunity ACT (AGOA), otherwise it will lose on its benefits. Tensions increased between the two countries when South Africa’s main concern was that US meat exports may contain the bacterial disease salmonella. However, the minister of South Africa’s department of trade and industry Rob Davies said the negotiations over the salmonella issue were concluded, meaning that the South African market is now open for 65 000 tonnes of US poultry import. African Dialogue anchor, Benjamin Moshtama spoke to Cyril Prinsloo, researcher of the Economic Diplomacy Programme of the South African Institute of International Affairs, Thabi Nkosi, senior economist of AgriSA and Kolofelo Maponya, CEO OF Daybreaks.
1/14/201659 minutes, 54 seconds
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Rwanda

Rwanda President, Paul Kagame has accepted to run for the third term in 2017 in a televised address recently. He has been president since 2000, but he has effectively been in control since his forces marched into the Rwandan capital, Kigali, to end the 1994 genocide. He was originally limited to two terms, but Rwanda has approved changes to the Constitution that would effectively allow Kagame to stay in power until 2034. He can run for another seven-year term in 2017, followed by two five-year terms. To chat about this and other related issues, we are joined on the line by:Yolande Bouka: Senior Research Associate: Conflict Prevention And Risk Analysis: Institute for Security Studies: Dr Check Achu: Research Specialist at the Africa Institute of South Africa, a research program of the Human Sciences Research Council: Munjozi Mutandiri: Indepenndent [Political Analyst: Human Rights Watch:
1/13/201654 minutes, 35 seconds
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South Sudan

The unilateral decision by South Sudanese President, Salva Kiir to increase the number of states from ten to twenty-eight has triggered varying reactions from rebel leader, Riek Machar and the country's constitutional and legal experts. Kiir's decision comes at a time when South Sudan is preparing to set up a Government of National Unity at the beginning of February.To help us discuss this we are now joined on the line by:James Shimanyula: Channel Africa News Correspondent: Dr Martin Rupiya: Researcher with the Institute of African Renaissance Studies, University of South Africa
1/12/201656 minutes, 47 seconds
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Racism

The South African Human Rights Commission has launched an investigation into the inflammatory comments on social media by suspended opposition Democratic Alliance member, Penny Sparrow and Standard Bank economist, Chris Hart. The investigation could lead to further legal steps.Sparrow compared black people to monkeys in a Facebook post referring to the state of public beaches after the festive holidays. Hart tweeted “More than 25 years after apartheid ended, the victims are increasing along with a sense of entitlement and hatred towards minorities”. The Human Rights Commission says its investigation will also include Justin van Vuuren’s comments calling some people “scum of the earth. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by:• Dr Marjorie Jobson: National Director: Khulumani Support Group: • Tinyiko Maluleke, independent political analyst from the University of Pretoria,
1/11/201645 minutes, 11 seconds
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African Farmers

Intro: A report released suggests that the African farmer is a dying breed. The 2015 Africa Agricultural Status Report found that the majority of the continent's food producers average 60 years of age. The report was released during the ongoing Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa [AGRA] conference in Lusaka Zambia. It calls for incentives to attract Africa's growing youth population back to farms. Suggesting that unemployed youth could be the solution to food insecurity, the continent A new report suggests that the African farmer is a dying breed. The 2015 Africa Agricultural Status Report found that the majority of the continent's food producers average 60 years of age. The report was released during the ongoing Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa [AGRA] conference in Lusaka Zambia. It calls for incentives to attract Africa's growing youth population back to farms. Suggesting that unemployed youth could be the solution to food insecurity, the continent's biggest challenges. International Fund for Agricultural Development youth co-ordinator, Elizabeth sendiwala:Today we speak to: • Dr. David S. Ameyaw,the head of Strategy, Monitoring and Evaluation,at the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA). • Dr Barbara van Koppen, Principal Researcher Poverty, Gender and Water of the Southern Africa Regional Program at the International Water Management Institute. • Gem Argwings-Kodhek, senior agribusiness adviser of the Africa Enterprise Challenge Fund
1/7/201639 minutes, 46 seconds
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Legalising euthanasia

Dignity South Africa has welcomed the North Gauteng High Court ruling allowing a Cape Town advocate to commit medically assisted suicide as the first step towards legalising euthanasia in South Africa. Willem Landman, the CEO of the Ethics Institute of South Africa and a member of Dignity SA, said the court order was only confined to the specific case of Robert Stransham-Ford, but would make it much easier for others who wanted to follow in his footsteps.Because parliament has not yet decided to adopt the draft legislation on euthanasia, other dying patients in similar circumstances would still have to approach the court for an order to allow them to commit assisted suicide.Not knowing at the time that Stransham-Ford had died, Landman described Judge Hans Fabricius’ ruling as a huge victory for Stransham-Ford and for Dignity SA, a non-profit organisation which advocates the legalisation of assisted suicide.Our guests to take this conversation further are:• Adv Mthunzi Mhaga, Spokesperson of South Africa’s Department of Justice: • Prof Sylvester Chima, Associate Professor, at the University of Kwazulu Natal, Colleges of Head Sciences: • Lee Last, Executive Member of Dignity South Africa: • Arch Bishop Stephen Zondo Founder and leader of the church, Rivers of Living Waters Ministries,
12/31/201538 minutes, 21 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
12/30/201541 minutes, 45 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
12/28/201539 minutes, 36 seconds
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2016 International Year of Pulses

In 2013 the United Nations declared that 2016 will be the International Year of Pulses. The hope of the 2016 International Year of Pulses (IYP 2016) is to position pulses as a primary source of protein and other essential nutrients.• Rose Mutuku is in Kenya and the founder and CEO of Smart Logistics, a supplier of beans, to the manufacturing industry for brewing, milling, and animal feed, as well as to humanitarian food agencies. She can talk about the realities of bean production in her part of the world, as well as what it would mean to small farmers economically if bean production was scaled up across the continent of Africa. + • Jean Claude Rubyogo is the bean expert who can provide t• he scientific perspective and also talk about the development of bean species across Africa. He is with the Pan African Bean Research Alliance, which is associated with CIAT. He can explain how the climbing bean in Rwanda works, how PABRA has assisted the development of the commodity White Gold Bean in Ethiopia and developed heat resistant beans in various location
12/17/201541 minutes, 32 seconds
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Finance Fracas

South African President Jacob Zuma has announced that "after serious reflection" he has decided to move David van Rooyen from his position after just four days in office and replace him with former finance minister, Pravin Gordhan. Zuma stunned the nation and the financial markets by firing Nhlanhla Nene from the post and replacing him with Van Rooyen. The rand went into freefall, dipping below the 16 rand to the US dollar level and government debt costs skyrocketed. Zuma was placed under massive pressure from business and some in his own party took the unprecedented step of publicly calling for his removal. To unpack this we are joined on the line by:Dr Somadoda Fikeni: Independent Political Analyst: Brett Bowes: Co-Editor of a book titled “Corporate Social Investment in South Africa” Franscois Stofberg: Economist at Efficient Group:
12/15/201557 minutes, 49 seconds
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HUMAN RIGHTS DAY

With the long episode of Oscar Pistorious’ trial the question of who has access to the courts and its processes has been a big question. The major questions that have been posed is does wealth give you an advantage in the courts? Does the social status of an individual give them merit in a case in front of the law? In light of this question,; we investigate the fact that do women have adequate access to the courts and the justice system. Today we speak to: • Nobukhosi Zulu, Candidate attorney Lawyers for Human Rights
12/10/201559 minutes, 53 seconds
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FOCAC

China and Africa will be cementing their economic and political relations over the next two days - with the China Africa Forum underway in Sandton South Africa. As many as 30 heads of states are among the delegates attendin the summit. China has come with plenty of deals to sign - pledging investment to the tune of billions of dollars. The trade relationship has grown rapidly in the past 15 years though largely skewed in China's favour. To help us analyse the situation we have Claysen Monyela, Spokesperson for the South African Department of International Relations.Margaret Mwanakatwe – Minister of Commerce and Trade for Zambia.And Dr Barnaba Marial Benjamin – Minister of Foreign Affairs and Co-operation for South Sudan
12/4/201557 minutes, 48 seconds
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NEPAD

Recently at the United Nations headquarters, their was the promotion of the African Union’s Agenda 2063 and identify ways of how the United Nations could support the union consisting of 54 African states. In one of the gatherings last week, the New Partnership for African Development ,NEPAD. was in the spotlight with the recognition that it laid a foundation for the development of critical regional and continental infrastructure.To assist us to look at the NEPAD Programme we have on the line: • Estherine Fotabong – Director of Programme Implementation and Coordination Directorate at NEPAD • Komla Bissi CAADP Adviser, Rural Infrastructure, Trade and Market Access ( The Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) was endorsed at the African Union Heads of State Summit as a New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) program in July 2003.)• Prof. Peter Ewang, Agriculture Extension Economist
12/3/201556 minutes, 57 seconds
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MISSION LOGISTICS & SUPPORT AFRICA CONFERENCE

In February 2015 the United Nations announced that the organisation expected African defence forces to become more independent and should develop the ability to deliver their own capacity. The UN offered to provide expertise rather than representation. Defence Logistics is paramount these days in light of the on-going armed conflict, conflict resolution, peacekeeping, logistics for security, peace support operations and humanitarian intervention on the African continent. The lightning speed at which conflict in Africa is accelerating places colossal strain upon the supply chain. Visibility and tracking of assets is pivotal to ensuring the right support is in the right place at the right time. Dedicated logistic communications and comprehensive information systems are also a vital part of enhanced logistic support capability. In light of this the Intelligence Transfer Centre is hosting the first annual Mission Logistics and Support Africa Conference, at the Indaba Hotel, just outside Johannesburg, South Africa. To tell us more about the event, we have Sudeera Susaka, Production Manager at the Intelligence Transfer Centre, Martin Ewi , Senior Researcher at the South Africa-based Institute for Security Studies, Ebrima Ceesay , Chief of Service delivery with UNAMID and Brigadier General Robert Gichangi Kabage, Chief of Systems with the Kenyan Ministry of Defence:
12/2/201558 minutes, 7 seconds
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WORLD AIDS DAY

December the 1st, every year, marks World AIDS Day. This year the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS) has been mainly focusing on bridging the gaps that have been identified in order to end the pandemic. This includes accelerating efforts for Key Affected Populations (KAPs) - which is those most vulnerable and likely to be exposed to HIV–such as Men who have sex with men (MSM), People who inject drugs (PWID), Transgender people and Sex workers (SWs). According to UNAIDS this will mean bringing together science and human rights based approaches as a global agenda. As a way forward towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the UNAIDS says new and innovative approaches are required in order to accelerate efforts and achieve goals more significantly. Detailed in the On the Fast-Track to end AIDS by 2030: Focus on location and population" report, UNAIDS now aims to focuses on the locations, populations and programmes that deliver the greatest impact. According to this report, around 2 million people have become infected with HIV in 2014 and 1.2 million people have died of AIDS-related illnesses in the same period. Though some strides have been attained with over 15 million people living with HIV now accessing antiretrovirals (ARV), which is up from 13.6 million in June 2014.Meanwhile in South Africa, a growing HIV pandemic continues to rise and the need to raise awareness, accelerate progress in HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and care remains a critical priority. According to UNAIDS data, 6.8 million people were living with HIV in 2014, compared to the 6.4 million recorded by Human Sciences Research Council's report in 2012.In response to the epidemic and the rate of new infections annually, the National Department of Health has thus implemented various programmes in the fight against HIV/AIDS. To discuss the situation further, we have :Vimbai Mavhereduzi: Member of the I want to know my status, an organization made of Zimbabwe Exiles from South Africa Professor Glenda Grey: President of the South African Medical Research Council: Florence Ngubeni-Allen: Global Advocate: Elizabeth Glasser Paediatric Foundation:
12/1/201555 minutes, 47 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
11/30/201555 minutes, 47 seconds
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COP 21 Preview

Next week Monday the Climate Change talks in Paris, France. Known as the United Nations Climate Change Conference, or COP 21, will be held o achieve a legally binding agreement on climate amongst world leader. The international climate conference will be held from 30 November to 11 December 2015. To unpack what we can expect at the conference we are joined by: • Romy Chavellier, researcher at the environment for governance of Africa’s resources programme, at South African Institute of International Affairs • Prof Bob Scholes at Systems Ecologist Wits University
11/26/201558 minutes, 5 seconds
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The Islamic State (IS)

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, now only known as the Islamic State can trace its roots back to 2002, when Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, a Jordanian who was to gain notoriety in the Iraqi insurgency from 2003 to 2006, founded a Jihadi organization called Tawhid wal-Jihad in the north of Iraq. Zarqawi had been linked with al-Qaeda while in Afghanistan in the late '90s, but was not a member of the group and disagreed with the tactic of focusing on the 'far enemy', the West, as opposed to the 'near enemy', the rulers in the Islamic world. Following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Zarqawi's organization grew more active and affiliated itself to al-Qaeda in 2004, becoming al-Qaeda in Iraq. Despite the tactical differences, this made a useful alliance of convenience: Zarqawi's organization gained the recruiting and resourcing benefits of being part of a global and credible jihadi organization, while al-Qaeda gained an affiliate in Iraq, already by that stage the global centre of jihad. This morning we will try and dissect and find out what the Islamic State is and what we can expect from it in the future. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by: Naeem Jeena: Executive Director: Afro Middle East Centre: Helmut Romer Heitman: Defense Analyst based in Pretoria, South Africa.
11/25/201558 minutes, 9 seconds
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16 DAYS OF ACTIVISM PREVIEW

South Africa is to launch the 16 Days of Nonviolence against Women and Children Campaign tomorrow the 25th of November. This morning however, we will be focusing our attention on the violence between Gay partners in a relationship. Analysts are saying people abuse their partners because they believe they have the right to control the person they’re dating. Maybe they believe that they should be in charge in the relationship. Maybe they think unequal relationships are ideal. Psychologists say abuse is a learned behavior. Sometimes people see it growing up. Other times they learn it from friends or popular culture. No matter where it’s learned, it’s not cool and it’s never justified. Many people experience or witness abuse growing up and decide not to use those negative and hurtful ways of behaving. It’s most important to know that abuse is a choice, and it’s not one that anyone has to make. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by:Jay Matlou: An openly Gay Activist: Mbuyiselo Botha: Sonke Gender Justice; Luckyboy Mkhondwane: Gay activist:
11/24/201559 minutes, 13 seconds
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Africa Peace Award

The African Union Commission was honoured this past weekend for its work to end conflicts on the African continent. The commission’s chairperson, Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, received the 2015 Africa Peace Award in front of up seven hundred delegates who gathered at Durban's International Convention Center, including the United Nations Under-Secretary and Special Advisor on Africa - Maged Abdelaziz, the president of South Africa Jacob Zuma and the human rights advocate, Graca Machel. The award event was organized by the African Center for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes, or Accord, and despite the focus being on achieving peace, many speakers emphasized the various challenges of conflict faced on the African continent. African Dialogue presenter Benjamin Moshatama spoke to ACCORD Executive Director Vasu Gounden and Kwezu Mgqibisa, which is expert on conflict issues at the organization.
11/23/201557 minutes, 8 seconds
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Paris Attacks and ISIS

French President François Hollande is said to plead with US President Barack Obama next week in Washington to show urgency in the fight against ISIS, also known as the Islamic State. As Paris struggles with the aftermath of the terrorist attacks that killed over 120 people last week, Hollande will aim to convince Obama that the world needs to act now and cannot afford a war of attrition that could take a long period. African Dialogue Presenter looks at subject of ISIS, and terrorism and speaks to Dr Lubna Nadvi, (lecturer of Political Science and International Relations from the University of Kwazulu Natal), Prof John Stremlau part of the Wits international relations department and Martin Ewi (senior researcher at the trans-natinoal threats and international crime division at the Institute for Security Studies).
11/19/201557 minutes, 40 seconds
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155 YEARS OF INDIAN PRESENCE IN SOUTH AFRICAN SOCIETY

A conference seeking to understand and appreciate the presence of the Indian population in South Africa was held over the week-end in Durban South Africa. The conference with a theme, “Ethnicity, Race and Citizenship: Place of Indians in the New South Africa”, also assessed and took stock of the Indian population’s contributions to the South African way of life as a whole, their troubles and anxieties, not only of the past but also of the present. The conference brought together researchers and academics and engaged in critical discussion on a range of themes and topics that relate to South African Indians. To help us unpack this historical milestone, we are joined on the line by:Professor Emeritus Pratak Kumar: School of Religion, Philosophy and ClassicsHoward College Campus University of KwaZulu-Natal Professor Shadrack Gutto: The Institute for African Renaissance Studies at the University of South Africa: Dr Lubna Nadvi: School of Political Sciences UKZN
11/18/201556 minutes, 13 seconds
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The Anzisha Prize Awards

The future of the African continent lies in the hands of young people who are willing to participate in the development of economic growth. The Anzisha Prize Awards is a vehicle that is set to ensure that development. It is an annual African event that seeks to award young entrepreneurs who have developed and implemented innovative solutions to social challenges or started successful businesses within their communities. Twelve finalists from across the African Continent have been shortlisted, with the Grand Winners set to share prizes worth 75-thousand dollars . The Finalists met with their mentors before the awards, and we asked some of them to explain the awards further - we spoke to Farai Munjoma, Zimbabwe: Co-founder of Shasha Iseminar, providing access to courseware content, past examination questions, solutions and career guidance to students. •Offers school fees contributions to students from revenues earned.Karidas Tshintsholo, South Africa : Co-founder of Push, Ismokol, a clothing brand that employs six people in the Ekangala township of Pretoria, with significant pent up demand due to savvy marketing techniques.Blessing Kwomo, Nigeria: Founder of De Rehoboths Therapeutic Studio, which extends home-based health care through tailored family action plans for treating illness and addressing root causes. Empowers families to live healthier within the context of their surroundings.Chris Kwekowe, Nigeria: Founder of Slatecube, an e-learning platform that allows learners to study ICT-related course work and be certified at their convenience.There are 200 active users on the platform this year.
11/17/201557 minutes, 15 seconds
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Burundi (latest)

The political climate in Burundi currently seems to be worsening day-by-day. Some political commentators are saying this has a lot to do with the political marginalization of the opposition by the government and showcases the emergence of violent political banditry. The current standoff between the incumbent party and the opposition, according to analysts, could lead to a major set back for democracy in Burundi. They further say to halt this post electoral authoritarian trend, all parties should resume dialogue within a sustainable framework. Unless the government of Burundi resumes this engagement, the country risks reversing the decade of progress it has enjoyed since its civil war ended in 2005. But what is the actual potential for a civil war in Burundi? To help us unpack this we are joined by:Martin Chungong: Secretary General of the Inter-Parliamentary Union:Carina Tertsakian: Senior Researcher at the Human Rights Watch based in London: Kwezi Mngqibisi: Manager for Interventions at the African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes
11/16/201550 minutes, 26 seconds
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Police brutality

Four police officers have been arrested in connection with the murder of suspected criminal, Khulekani Mpanza, in Krugersdorp. The footage showed Mpanza being shot in the chest by one of the officers in what has been alleged to be an execution-style killing. Mpanza, who was also armed with a gun that fell from his hand at the time, was killed while fleeing from the police who were responding to a robbery at the hardware store in the area. Just a few years ago we know of Mido Macia who was dragged behind a police van, he later succumbed to his injuries and died. We as the question, just how much force can the police apply? Have they lost the plot?TO help us take this discussion further we are joined on the line by:…… 1. Sizamele Cebekhulu President: POPCRU2. Mpho Nkwinika President: South African Policing Union3. Johan Burger Researcher: Institute of Security Studies
11/12/201559 minutes, 24 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
11/11/201555 minutes, 58 seconds
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National Disability Rights Awareness Month

At the beginning of the month, South Africa’s Social Development Minister, Bathabile Dlamini officially launched this year’s national Disability Rights Awareness Month in Pretoria. The minister highlighted that persons with disabilities enjoy protection against discrimination on the basis of disability. Dlamini said that the right to substantive equality and dignity is enshrined in the country’s Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. African Dialogue Presenter Benjamin Moshatama spoke to Robert Masambo, National Chair of Disabled People South Africa and National Executive Director Antonius Spek, of the South African Council for the Blind.
11/10/201558 minutes, 11 seconds
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The South African Literary Awards (SALA)

The South African Literary Awards (SALA) are administered by the wRite associates (R/A Lit Consultants: an events and project management company specialising in the arts, culture and heritage realm, with particular focus on the literary arts), in partnership with the South African Department of Arts and Culture (DAC). The awards aim to pay tribute to writers who have "distinguished themselves as groundbreaking producers and creators of literature". The awards recognise a variety of literary forms written in any of the South African official languages. Today presenter Benjamin Moshatama spoke to Morokabe Raks Seakhoa, the project director of the SA literary Awards, Carol Campbell, the winner at the SALA awards in the first time published author category, Bishop M.T Makobe, winner in poetry in Sepedi language and Zukiswa Wanner who won the K. Sello Duiker Memorial Literary Award category.
11/9/201555 minutes, 25 seconds
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AFRICAN WOMEN IN AGRICUTURE CONFERENCE

The conversation of gender is becoming dominant when speaking about Agriculture on the continent of Africa. According to UNWomen, on average women make up about 43 per cent of the agricultural labour force in developing countries. Currently the second conference for Women in Agribusiness, is underway in Durban, bringing together women in agriculture, food security and agribusiness. Under the theme: Women in entrepreneurial development: A must for the success of the sustainable development goals in Africa, the conference is organised by NEPAD and the Agribusiness Development Agency. We are are crossing over to Durban. Joining us on the other side we are joined by: • Esterine Fotabong – Programmes Implimentation and Co-ordination Director for NEPAD • Bongiwe Njobe - director ZA NAC Consulting and Investment Company• Dr Anna Msowoya - an entrepreneur from MALAWI ( attending conference for the first time.)
11/4/201559 minutes, 56 seconds
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JOURNALISM IN AFRICA

The United Nations General Assembly adopted at its 68th session in 2013 a resolution called the “International Day to End Impunity for Crimes Against Journalists”. The resolution urged member states to implement definite measures countering the present culture of impunity. The 02 November was chosen in commemoration of the two French journalists who were assassinated in Mali. The resolution condemns all attacks and violence against journalists and media workers. Then in 2014 the UNESCO Director General Irina Bokova condemned the killing of 87 journalists.TO help us take this discussion further we are joined on the line by:……1. Bernard Bakunkira - SABC Channel Africa Correspondent2. Mr TshamanoMakhadi - Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) Broadcast Journalism Lecturer3. Ms Mahlatse Gallens - SANEF Gauteng Convenor and SABC Journalist
11/3/201557 minutes, 56 seconds
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7th Annual Women in Politics in Africa Conference

Advancing and empowering more women to lead and revolutionarise politics on the African continent. Cape Verde has the highest number of women occupying ministerial positions in Africa with nearly half of its 17 ministers being female, a new survey prepared by UN Women and the Inter Parliamentary Union shows. South Africa is the next highest ranked country in Africa, with 41.7%, or 15 of its 36 ministers being female. Rwanda has 11 of its 31 ministers as women, ahead of Burundi, Tanzania and Guinea-Bissau, which all come in among the top 20 positions globally. Africa has seven countries where at least 30% of ministers are women, on a list that counts 30 nations meeting this threshold, suggesting it holds a quarter of the global representation and making it only second to Europe.” – The Conference was held at the Indaba Hotel just outside Johannesburg In South Africa. Channel Africa was there to broadcast live. Our guest were:The 1st round of guests.Design Deysel she is a business consultant and organiser of the eventNokulunga Ntuli is the law expert at the department of political affairs at the African UnionThe 2nd round guestsHon. Dr Bernadette Lanai the vice president of the pan African parliament Ms Loyiso Lugayeni she is the ANC Youth League Johannesburg regionall secretary
10/29/201555 minutes, 42 seconds
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Deep Ocean Mining

South Africa’s Department of Mineral Resources has granted three prospecting rights to private companies for seabed mining in the country’s exclusive economic zone. Together, these prospecting areas total approximately 10% of our exclusive economic zone (approximately 150 000 square kilometres). Deep sea mining is a relatively new mineral retrieval process that takes place on the ocean floor. Today on the show we will look this new development in South Africa and look at the environmental and economic implications of sea bed mining. We are joined by: • Saul Roux, Legal Campaigner in the Mining Programme: Centre for Environmental • Dr Johann Augustyn, Secretary: South African Deep-Sea Trawling Industry Association
10/28/201556 minutes, 37 seconds
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World Day for Audiovisual Heritage

Today the world acknowledges the World Day for Audiovisual Heritage. This is a day, now headed by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, aims to raise awareness about the importance of audiovisual documents and the importance of archiving. This year’s theme is “Archives at risk: protecting the world's identities". Today we speak to: • Sipho Hlope, archivist from Springbok-radio • Namatama Mate, journalist and archivist from SABC. • Cecil Nguva-uva – former Southern African Broadcasters Association • Ilse Assman Chairperson of the Southern African Broadcasting Association’s Audiovisual Committee
10/27/201558 minutes, 34 seconds
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Fees must fall protest

Despite of South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma agreeing to no tuition fee increase next year for universities, students have committed to continue protesting this – with a new demand of free education. Last week, students accelerated their #FeesMustFall protest, marching to the Union Building’s in Pretoria, and Parliament in Cape Town, where they clashed with police on both occasions. Now students of the University of Witswatersrand (Wits) are calling for this year’s exams to be postponed indefinitely as they continue with protests. Today on the show we look the implications of the no percent increase and look at the ongoing strike. African Dialogue’s Benjamin Moshatama spoke to Khaya Nkwanyana, the spokesperson Of the department of higher education and training, Kagisho Mamabolo spokesperson of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)and Luzuko Buku, the South African Student Congress (SASCO)Secretary General.
10/27/201558 minutes, 13 seconds
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Amani Africa

The vision of achieving a united, peaceful and prosperous Africa entered a new phase on Monday this week, when a large multi-country military exercise kicked off. The Amani Africa Two field training exercise with more than 5,400 troops, police and civilians participating started at the South Africa Army Combat Training Centre in Northern Cape. The exercise finishes on November the 5th and is conducted by the African Union, with the intent of evaluating the state of readiness of the African Standby Force and its Rapid Deployment Capability. The troops are being drilled to be part of the new 25,000-strong multi-national force, which will be mandated to intervene in African countries rocked by genocide, crimes against humanity or war crimes. It is expected to be fully operational by early next year. The force is made up of five brigades formed by Africa's economic groupings including the Economic Community of West Africa States, East African Community, North African Regional Capability, Economic Community of Central African States, and the Southern African Development Community. Its logistics headquarters will be located in the Cameroon city of Douala after an agreement was signed to that effect last week. To help us investigate the reasoning for the event, we have Kwezi Mngibisa: Manager of the African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes heading of the Peace and Security Unit, which includes the Training for Peace in Africa Program and the African Civil-Military Co-ordination Programme, Gustavo de Carvalho: Senior Researcher: Conflict Management and Peace building at the Institute for Security Studies, in Pretoria, and Brigadier General Xolani Mabanga: Director: Defense Corporate Communications in South Africa :
10/22/201558 minutes, 51 seconds
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AFRICAN CITIES

African Cities face many challenges which range from service delivery to housing and creating jobs, with the greatest challenge being grassroots communities being involved in local governance. With the increasing rate of urbanization there are many opportunities in the cities on the continent but also there are many challenges because of overpopulation. To focus on these issues next month the AfriCities Summit will host its seventh edition at the Sandton Convention Centre in South Africa. The theme of the gathering is set to be “Shaping the future of Africa with the people: Africa’s local government contribution to the Africa 2063 Vision”. African Dialogue presenter Benjamin Moshatama spoke to the secretary general of the United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLGA African Cities face many challenges which range from service delivery to housing and creating jobs, with the greatest challenge being grassroots communities being involved in local governance. With the increasing rate of urbanization there are many opportunities in the cities on the continent but also there are many challenges because of overpopulation. To focus on these issues next month the AfriCities Summit will host its seventh edition at the Sandton Convention Centre in South Africa. The theme of the gathering is set to be “Shaping the future of Africa with the people: Africa’s local government contribution to the Africa 2063 Vision”. African Dialogue presenter Benjamin Moshatama spoke to the secretary general of the United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLGA), Mr Jean Pierre Elong Mbassi and The South African Local Government Association (SALGA) Chairperson Mr Thabo Manyoni.), Mr Jean Pierre Elong Mbassi and The South African Local Government Association (SALGA) Chairperson Mr Thabo Manyoni.
10/21/201559 minutes, 52 seconds
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Student Unrest

Students at the University Of Witwatersrand have been protesting over the proposed increased in tuition fees for next year. The institution has proposed an increase of 10.5%. Gates entering the university have been barricaded preventing both the staff and student s from entering the institution. A high police presence has been maintained at the university to keep calm and order as the students protest. Other universities around South Africa have also joined the march in protest of the high cost of tertiary education. Student organisations have been seen at the fore front of the march, saying the parents are already struggling to cope with the existing fees, and they wouldn’t even begin to cope with the increase. To help to unpack this global crisis we have on the line:……1. KhayeNkwanyana Spokesperson Department of Higher Education and Training 2. NompenduloMkhatshwa SRC President: Wits3. VuyaniPambo Economic Freedom Fighters SRC
10/20/201559 minutes, 51 seconds
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Media Freedom Day

The 19th of October sees South Africa commemorating the anniversary of Black Wednesday. It Highlights the occasion which occured 38 years ago when the then South African Government shocked the world by banning a host of newspapers, 19 organisations and scores of apartheid government critics were detained. The banning of the publications - The World and Weekend World on this day in 1977 was a brutal act of censorship the likes of which was not seen again until the imposition of the "State of the Emergency" in the mid 1980's. Today we want to look at the current state of media freedom on the African continent. To Help us we have South African National Editors Forum in Gauteng, Mahlatse Gallens, Leslie Lefkow, A senior Researcher with the international organisation Human Rights Watch, and Tom Rhodes, East African Representative for the Committee to Protect Journalists - CPJ:
10/19/201559 minutes, 51 seconds
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S A mining

The mining industry in Africa, as a whole, and in South Africa in particular, has recently seen many challenges. Ranging from a drop in mineral prices, strikes by miners for better working conditions and better pay to court cases - such as the one in South Africa where lawyers representing 56 miners who claim to have contracted silicosis during work and have issued a class action suit against a group of mines. Global mining and commodities trader Glencore last week announced the closure of its Eland Platinum Mine, resulting in the retrenchment of 818 workers. To help us analyse the situation we have Senior Executive at the South African Chamber of Mines, Dr Elize Strydom and Alan Fine representing mines involved in the silicosis case, South Africa's Deputy Minister of Mineral Resources, Godfrey Olifant, and Chief Negotiator in the South African Coal sector at the National Union of Mine Workers, Peter Bailey:
10/14/201557 minutes, 58 seconds
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ICC SA ANALYSIS

The ANC wants South Africa to begin a process of withdrawing from the International Criminal Court because it believes the ICC has lost its direction. That’s according to the party's international relations subcommittee chairperson Obed Bapela. He made this announcement on Sunday during the last day of the 3day National General Council of the ANC. He has further said there were a handful of powerful countries which refused to be members of the international court, yet they still had the power to refer matters to the court. To help us unpack this development, we are now joined on the line by:• Fadi El Abdallah: The ICC Spokesperson : • Dr Martin Revayi Rubiya: A Visiting Researcher with the Institute of African Renaissance Studies at the University of South Africa:• Courtney Griffths: Charles Taylor’s Lawyer at the ICC• Netsanet Belay: Amnesty International’s Research and Advocacy Director For Africa
10/13/20151 hour, 2 minutes, 38 seconds
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Governance Index

Progress in governance on the African continent has stalled. This is according to the new The Ibrahim Index of African Governance which was launched this week by the Mo Ibrahim Foundation. The index showed that more than a third of African countries are sliding backwards as far as governance is concerned, with some 21 counties of the 54 states ranked deteriorating in overall governance performance since 2011. To debate the issue we have Elizabeth McGarth, Director of the Ibrahim index, and Sophie Mashipa, Director of Communications at the Foundation:
10/9/201559 minutes, 45 seconds
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Africa Agricultural

A new report suggests that the African farmer is a dying breed. The 2015 Africa Agricultural Status Report found that the majority of the continent's food producers average 60 years of age. The report was released during the ongoing Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa [AGRA] conference in Lusaka Zambia. It calls for incentives to attract Africa's growing youth population back to farms. Suggesting that unemployed youth could be the solution to food insecurity, the continent's biggest challenges. Benjamin Moshatama spoke to Dr. David S. Ameyaw,the head of Strategy, Monitoring and Evaluation,at the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), Dr Barbara van Koppen, Principal Researcher Poverty, Gender and Water of the Southern Africa Regional Program at the International Water Management Institute and Gem Argwings-Kodhek, senior agribusiness adviser of the Africa Enterprise Challenge Fund.
10/7/201558 minutes, 9 seconds
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World Teachers Day

Today the World commemorates Teachers Day. UNESCO inaugurated 5 October as World Teachers' Day. The Day represents a significant effort to raise awareness, understanding and appreciation for the vital contribution that teachers make to education and development across the globe. In many countries, the quality of education is undermined by a deficit of teachers. Added to the challenge of numbers is one of quality: all too often, teachers work without resources or proper training. To hear more about teacher's day and a number of challenges the profession is going through we have Ben Machipi: General Secretary of the Professional Education Union in South Africa, Abdul Wahab Coulibaly; Education Program Specialist with the United Nations, Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization - UNESCO, AND Mary Crompton from the London-based Organisation Teachers Solidarity but first an update from Kenya on the 90 day suspension of that country's teachers strike here's Sarah Kimani on the line from Nairobi:
10/5/201559 minutes, 33 seconds
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Tell Everyone

Tell Everyone" is a campaign aimed at reaching seven billion people and telling them about the 17 Global Goals agreed to at the United Nations Assembly. The campaign is using various media platforms to get the message across, with 60 countries being involved.One of the innovative methods being used is a seven-day pop-upc radio station which will provide listeners with content detailng the Goals for Sustainable Development. To help us look at this multifaceted global media campaign, we have Lisa Henry who is involved in the Global Goals Campaign in Africa, Sibonile Dube , Unilever Communications Director and Martin Davies, Everyone's Africa Co-ordinator:
10/1/201559 minutes, 32 seconds
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Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso's army has taken control of the barracks of an elite force behind a failed coup earlier this month. It's not clear if there were any casualties. The army has urged the population to avoid the Ouaga 2000 district, where the camp is located for security reasons. Interim President, Michel Kafando, and Prime Minister, Yacouba Isaac Zida, were arrested by the elite presidential guard on September 16. General Gilbert Diendere was quick to take power, but he resigned a week later under pressure from the West African regional bloc, Burkina Faso's military and protesting citizens. Kafando, who was formally reinstated last Wednesday, recently issued a decree disbanding the presidential guard. For more on this and what the future holds for the country, we are joined on the line by:Dr David Zounmenou: A senior researcher in the African Security Analysis Program at the Institute for Security Studies Dr Richard Obinna Iroanya: Senior Researcher at the Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute Jemini Pandya: Spokesperson for the Inter Parliamentary Union from Brussels
9/30/201559 minutes, 58 seconds
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Africa's Economy

African countries have not been isolated from the impact of the downturn in global growth. The current financial and economic crisis has affected the drivers of Africa’s recent growth performance. Demand for raw materials and their prices are falling, and capital flows are declining. China’s growth has slowed, and on the African continent growth forecasts have already been drastically revised downwards. Although the immediate impact of the crisis were contained, the medium-term effects are likely to be greater. To discuss the current economic situation on the African continent we are joined by a team of esteemed guests in the name of?Patrick Bond: Economic Analyst (STUDIO GUEST) Majakathata Mokoena: Chair and Chief Executive Officer for Mohudi Group Dr Peter Karungu: Economist
9/29/201559 minutes, 40 seconds
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EU Refugee Analysis

As migrants continue to seek refuge in Europe, governments are still struggling on how to receive them. The latest is that up to seventeen Syrian asylum seekers drowned after a boat sank off Turkey's coast. Many continue to cross the Mediterreanean Sea, some 300 000 migrants and refuges have arrived in Greece so far this year, most of them moving on try try to reach other EU countries. Last week the European Union overrode bitter objections of four of its members establish a plan to relocate 120,000 migrants around the continent. To assist us to analyse the current situation, we have :• Tina Ghelli, Senior Regional External Relations Officer UNHCR Regional Representation for Southern Africa• Craig Smith, Specialist Immigration Practitioner• Leon Issacson Managing Director of Global Migration
9/28/20151 hour
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African Airlines

Africa has currently seen the launch of new low cost airlines such as Fastjet which has recently commenced flights between Dar es Salaam and Harare. Since low cost routes opened in Africa, prices have dropped by around 40%. According to a study by Intervistas passenger number have risen by almost half. However some low cost airlines say in order to protect international state owned airlines governments are blocking competitors. To assist us on this: • Richard Bodin is fastjet’s Chief Commercial Officer • Chris Zweigenthal, Executive Committee Airlines Association of Southern Africa • Guy Leach. Editor of Flight.com, • Earlier on I spoke to Linden Burns Managing Director of Plane Talking...He suggested categories for low cost airlines.
9/23/201557 minutes, 15 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
9/22/201557 minutes, 7 seconds
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Burkina Faso

Benin’s President, Thomas Boni Yayi says Burkina Faso will return to civilian rule and an interim government led by the president, Michel Kafando, will be reinstated, reversing a military coup. The announcement followed a third day of unrest as hundreds of protesters burned tyres and erected barricades in the streets of Ouagadougou. Young people wielding sticks and slingshots dragged fences into the streets to block soldiers loyal to Diendéré, who was facing intense diplomatic pressure over Thursday’s coup. At least 10 people have been killed and more than 100 injured in street clashes with soldiers since the coup condemned by the US, France and the UN. Soldiers from the presidential guard stormed into a cabinet meeting on Wednesday and abducted President Kafando and ministers, disrupting a transition period due to end with elections on the 11th of October. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by:Professor Kealeboga Maphunye: the inaugural WIPHOLD-Brigalia Bam Research Professor and Chair in Electoral Democracy in AfricaJemini Pandya Spokesperosn for the Inter-Parliamentary Kwezi Mnqibisa: Manager of ACCORD's Peace and Security Unit (Accord is a South African-based organization involved in Conflict Resolution, Peacekeeping and Preventive Diplomacy throughout the continent of Africa
9/21/201557 minutes, 53 seconds
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Literature Symposium

The Symposium of women in literature that is set to start today in Johannesburg, South Africa will bring together women writers to discuss a range of issues that affect their profession. The theme is "looking back, looking Forward, Turmoil and Transformation- Asserting Women in the World", and the symposium is hosted by the department of arts and culture and arts alive.. The literary symposium will also host a special tribute to the life and work of the late Noble Laureate, Nadine Gordimer and African-American poet Jayne Cortez. To tell us more about the event, we have Roshnie Moonsammy - Festival Director , Kadija Sesay Author of IRKI Nubian for Homeland, and Natalia Molebatsi South African Author of books such as "Sardo Gun" she is also an Editor and Publisher:
9/17/201559 minutes, 55 seconds
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FOOD SECURITY

For almost half a century, Sub-Saharan Africa has been struggling, in one form or another, with food insecurity. This ongoing condition has been caused by a number of factors including, distribution obstacles, global climate change, a lack of successful local agriculture, and an inability or disinterest to act by local officials. The situation has been further complicated by an inefficient and disorganized international response to the crisis. By far, Southern Africa has borne the brunt of food insecurity with Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana and Malawi the hardest hit. To help us discuss this food insecurity crisis, we are joined on the line by: Martin Malelembe: Channel Africa Malawi News Correspondent: David Orr: Communications Officer for Southern Africa United Nations World Food ProgrammeNokutula Mhene:Economic Justice Campaigns Advisor Oxfam South Africa Mr David Phiri - FAO Sub-regional Coordinator for Southern Africa
9/16/201559 minutes, 54 seconds
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International Day of Democracy

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Democracy is annually held on September 15 to raise public awareness about democracy. Many people and organizations worldwide, including government agencies and non-government organizations, hold various initiatives to promote democracy on the International Day of Democracy. Events and activities include discussions, conferences and press conferences involving keynote speakers, often those who are leaders or educators heavily involved in supporting and endorsing democratic governments and communities. But have we really realised the fruits of democracy? Are those countries that say they are democratic really practice democracy fully fledged?To help to unpack this global crisis we have on the line:…… 1. Martin Chungong Secretary General Inter-Parliamentary Union2. Ibrahim Fakir Manager Electoral Institute for Sustainability of Democracy in Africa3. Dr Augustine Mogolowond Director Institute of Democracy for Africa
9/15/201559 minutes, 52 seconds
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Homo Naledi

On the program today we look at the Homo that was found at Maropeng the Cradle of Human kind. The Homo was then named Homo Naledi. It was discovered by a team led Paleoanthropologist Lee Berger of the University of Witwatersrand.
9/14/201559 minutes, 42 seconds
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The International Hospitality Conference

The 9th annual Hotel Investment Conference Africa, fondly known as HICA, is currently underway in Johannesburg, South Africa. Organizers of this conference hope the conference will broaden its view of the hospitality sector across sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on who’s behind the deals, growth markets, technology partners and trends driving profitability. It is being hosted under the auspices of the Tourism Business Council of South Africa. As the leading hotel investment conference in sub Saharan Africa, HICA assembles the region’s senior hospitality professionals, international hoteliers, investors, developers and top public sector leaders from across the region. To chat to us about this conference, we are now joined in our mobile studio by:Derek Hannekom SA Minister of TourismMmatsatsi Ramawela – CEO Tourism Business Council SAMark Satterfield (COO of Marriott International)
9/10/20151 hour, 2 minutes, 47 seconds
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14th World Forestry Congress

The fourteenth World Forestry Congress is currently underway in Durban, South Africa. This event is the largest gathering for the global forestry community and is hosted for hosted for the first time in Africa. The theme this year is “Forests and People: Investing in a sustainable Future”. This theme aims to look at the diverse challenges faced by people living in forests in different regions. We speak to: • Trevor Abrahams: Secretary General of the 14th World Forestry Congress • Dr Godwin Kowero, Executive Secretary of the African Forestry ForumDr. Aissetou Yaye,Executive Secretary for The African Network for Agriculture, Agroforestry and Natural Resources Education (ANAFE) is a network of 136 educational institutions in 35 African countries whose objective is to strengthen the teaching of multi-disciplinary approaches to land management. Christina Nkosi, a student at the University of Venda
9/9/201559 minutes, 57 seconds
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Migration problem

Latest news from the European Union concerning the refugee problem , is that Germany has urgeed neighbours to do more to ease the crisis.EU officials are debating new migrant quotas, and if countries should be able to buy out of an agreement. Even Britain has relented its strong stance and has agreed to take in 20-thousand Syrian refugees over 5 years. While the political debate goes on, the situation facing the refugees is still bad, Child refugees are threatened with beatings,and possible rape while on the way to Sweden. To help us look at the problem more in-depth, we have Craig Smith, A Specialist Immigration Practitioner, Leon Issacson,Managing Director of Global Migration, Gershon Mosiane Chairperson for the Forum for Immgration Preactitioners of South Africaand Ntokozo Mahangum, Media and Communications Consultant, for the International Organisation for Migration:
9/8/201559 minutes, 52 seconds
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Somalia and Al-Shabaab

Military sources in Uganda and Somalia say at least 37 African Union soldiers have been killed in an Attack by Al-Shabaab militants in southern Somalia on Tuesday last week. The attack by the Somali terrorist group occurred on a remote African Union base in the town of Janaale. It was the largest loss sustained by the Ugandan contingent of the AU Mission to Somalia, or AMISOM, since 2012.Other Western sources said that as many as 50 AU troops were killed. The 22,000-strong, United Nations-backed AMISOM force consists of troops from Uganda, Burundi, Kenya, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Sierra Leone. To help us look at this horrendous act by the Al-Shabaab rebels, we are joined on the line by:James Shemayula: Channel Africa Correspondent: Kwezi Mngqibisa: Manager: Interventions at ACCORD a South African-based organisation involved in Conflict Resolution, Peacekeeping and Preventive Diplomacy throughout the continent Laetitia Bader, Researcher in the Africa Division at Human Rights Watch and our Somalia expertHelmoed Heitman: Defence Specialist:
9/7/201553 minutes, 14 seconds
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Conference of Parties (COP 21)

Pre-meetings are taking place around the world as to prepare for the annual Conference of Parties (COP 21) which takes place in Paris, France during December. The COP meetings have been taking place since the Rio Earth Summit took place in 1992, which saw the adoption of the United Nations' Framework on Climate Change. The UNFCCC which came into force on the 21dt of March 1994, now has a near universal membership of 195 parties. This years meeting - known as the 2015 Paris Climate Conference - is expected to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate change that will aim to keep global warming below two degrees Celsius. To help us look at the preparations more closely we have Patrick Dowling, Education Head at the Wildlife and Environment in South Africa, Melissa Fourie, Executive Director of the Centre for Environmental Rights, and Dominique Doyle An Energy Policy Officer for Earthlife Africa:
9/3/20151 hour, 51 seconds
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African Dialogue

A leading official says South Sudan’s governing Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) would make reconciliation, unity and forgiveness a top priority during the transitional period of the government of national unity. Former South Sudanese cabinet affairs minister, Deng Alor Kuol, said the work of the secretary general of the SPLM, Pagan Amum, as chief administrator in the party, would be dedicated to organizing the party. He underscored the recently signed peace agreement and said it should not be read as a reward or return to the status quo, but rather, an opportunity to allow the ruling party to correct itself and accept their actions. We are now joined on the line by a panel of esteemed guests to discuss the latest on South Sudan. We have…………………Ambassador Mr. Philip Jada Natana, Head of Mission of South Sudan Tom Rhodes: Committee to Protect Journalists: Luka Biong Deng Kuol: Director of the Centre for Peace and Development Studies, University of Juba, Global Fellow at the Peace Research Institute Oslo and Associate Fellow at the Carr Centre for Human Rights Policy at Harvard Kennedy SchoolDr Sylvester B. Maphosa: Chief Research Specialist: Governance & Security program of the Africa Institute of South Africa in the Human Sciences Research Council
9/2/20151 hour, 1 minute, 14 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
8/31/201558 minutes, 30 seconds
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Women in Science

Science IS an industry where women are underrepresented. According to The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) just one in five countries has achieved gender parity in sub-saharan Africa, whereby 45% t0 55% of researchers are women. It is also interesting to note that women researchers and scientists are much more likely to work in the academic and government sectors, while men usually work in the private sector where they are offered better salaries and opportunities. Recently South Africa’s Department of Science and Technology recognized women scientists and researchers in the country. Through their South African Women In Science Awards women are encouraged in their involvement and contribution in the science field. To assist us on the topic of World Water week, we will speak to: • Dr Phetiwe Matutu, Chief Director of Human Capital and Science Promotion at the Department of Science and Technology • Dr Lisa Claire Du Toit, lecturer of pharmaceutical chemistry in the Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology at the University of the Witswatersrand • Dr Gina Ziervogel, lecturer in the Department of Environmental and Geographical Science and research fellow in t he African Climate and Development Initiative at the University of Cape Town
8/27/201559 minutes, 23 seconds
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Constitutional Democracy

The School of Public Leadership at the South African University of Stellenbosch University, in co-operation with the South African Centre for Constitutional Rights and the European Academy's Institute for Studies on Federalism and Regionalism, recently held a 3 day conference on strengthening Constitutional Democracy with a specific focus on provincial and local government. The aim of the conference hosted in the country's mother city of Cape Town was to establish interaction between academics and professionals, to contribute to finding solutions to some of the practical problems faced by societies in multi-sphere systems of government. To help us unpack there issues we spoke to Professor Erwin Schwella and Senior Lecturer Dr Dirk Brand of the University of Stellenbosch, and Phephelaphi Dube, a Legal Officer at the Centre for Constitutional Rights ....
8/26/201557 minutes, 26 seconds
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World Water Week

Intro: World Water week started this weekend and ends this Friday, is currently under in Stockholm, Sweden. This gathering will see government officials and those from the NGO world will gather with scientists, thinkers and innovators gathering to speak on issues relating to water. This year’s World Water Week theme is “Water for Development”. It is said that this theme will enable experts at looking at the sustainable development goals.To assist us on the topic of World Water week, we will speak to: • Dr Matthys Dippenaar, lecturer at the Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology department at the University of Pretoria. • Dr Thabo Nkambule, a senior lecturer in research Nanotechnology and Water Sustainability Research Unit, College of Science, at the University of South Africa • Sputnick Ratau, Director in the media liaison at South Africa’s department of Water and Sanitation.
8/25/201557 minutes, 43 seconds
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South Sudan Debate

African regional leaders from the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, (IGAD), The African Union and the United Nations Security Council have given yet another ultimatum to the warring factions in South Sudan to reach an agreement on outstanding issues and seal a final deal. The 28th extraordinary summit of heads of state and government of the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development was last Friday wrapping up in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, after two days of intensive discussions on South Sudan. IGAD, the regional bloc mediating the two South Sudan warring parties has brought President Salva Kiir and his former deputy turned rebel leader, Riek Machar, to face-to-face talks on Thursday and Friday last week. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by:• Ambassador Philip Jada Natana, Head of Mission of South Sudan• Professor Fanie Vermaak: Lecturer at the Department of Semitics at Unisa: • Luka Biong Deng : Director of the Centre for Peace and Development Studies, University of Juba, Global Fellow at the Peace Research Institute Oslo and Associate Fellow at the Carr Centre for Human Rights Policy at Harvard Kennedy School.
8/24/201557 minutes, 58 seconds
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Mandarin

The school curriculum in South Africa will officially include the Chinese language of Mandarin from January 2016. This is according to Department of Basic Education. The department says this will be offered as a second elective subject. China is South Africa’s biggest trading partner, and from January 2016, learners in grades 4 to 12 will be able to pick up the Chinese language. In March last year, Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga, signed an implementation plan between the Ministry of Education in China and the Department of Basic Education, to strengthen education ties at an institutional and policy level. One aspect of the agreement included cultural exchange and the promotion of Mandarin being taught in South African schools. To help us discuss what some see as an emotive subject, we are joined on the line by:Elijah Mhlanga: Chief Director: Communications Department of Basic Education Julian Fisher: Managing Director at Africa Integrity Services Limited( The Company provides what it calls the highest quality Intelligence in Africa to support Investors at each stage of their business life cycle Malose Kutumela: President of the Professional Educators Union: We had invited a Spokesperson of the South African Democratic Teachers’ Union, Nomusa Ncimbi, but withdrew at the 11th hour.
8/20/201555 minutes, 23 seconds
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SADC Wrap

The Southern African Development Community's 35th Summit ended in Gaborone Botswana yesterday, and Amnesty International has urged Botswana President, Ian Khama, to use his tenure and leadership position as chairperson of the organization to prioritise finding solutions to the human rights crisis in the region. Amnesty says the most pressing issues President Khama should address, include the ongoing suppression of dissent in Angola and the killing and torture of police and soldiers accused of leading a mutiny in Lesotho. That's following his take over from President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe. To look at what the SADC is all about, and to scrutinize the outcomes of the 35th Summit that has just concluded, we are joined on the line by Knox Chitiyo: Associate Fellow at Chatmam House based in London, Muluka Miti-Drummond: Regional Advocacy Director: Southern Africa Litigation Centre, Colleen Lowe Morna : Gender Links Chief Executive Officer, and Dewa Mavhinga: Senior Researcher, Zimbabwe/Southern Africa, Human Rights Watch:
8/19/201556 minutes, 42 seconds
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DISABLED WOMEN IN THE WORK PLACE

Disabled Women around South Africa still face challenges when it comes to getting employed. Employers are obliged by government to have a fair amount of representation of disabled people, but yet again it seems companies seem to prefer taking male candidates. President Jacob Zuma revealed in September 2011 that a Disability Act is being crafted to deal with enforcement, non-compliance and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The convention covers areas such as accessibility, rehabilitation, participation in political life, equality and non-discrimination of the disabled. To help us talk more about this we are joined on the line by:1. Peo MokotoProvincial Manager Disabled People South Africa (DPSA)2. KC MakhubeleMarketing Executive Quest Staffing Solutions 3. Ms Lebogang ManyaneDeputy Chairpesron: Gauteng Provincial Executive Committee South African National Council for the Blind
8/18/201557 minutes, 51 seconds
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17 Aug

MEDIA FREEDOM IN AFRICAOn the Programme today we talk media freedom! Is the media really free in the African continent? We have seen in the recent past, moves by government to silence the media on issues. In Zimbabwe we know of the disappearing of a Journalist who was abducted by unknown men. In South Africa during the Nkandla visit by the Adhoc committee initially journalist were not allowed to join the committee on the tour to assess the Nkandla upgrades. On the other hand we know that in Zambia some media houses have been blocked on the internet space and can’t be accessed. So are we going towards an era where media will be regulated? To help us analyse the situation we have :1. Steven Friedman Political analyst 2. Carol Mohlala Senior Researcher Media Monitors Africa
8/17/201555 minutes, 7 seconds
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Agriculture

A high-level policy dialogue which aims to look at agricultural trade in Southern Africa is underway in Johannesburg. The gathering which started yesterday also aims to look at management and investment in the agricultural sector in the region. The gathering called the 2015 Southern Africa Regional Dialogue on Agriculture was organized by UNAIDS and International Water Management Institute. This dialogue brings together a diversity of stakeholders drawn from the entire agricultural value chain covering both the demand and supply side together. Today we are crossing live to Benoni, at the Birchwood hotel, where our guests are standing by: • Timothy Semlinga a SADC Researcher in Botswana• CEO OF COMESA, Argent Chula• Winston Makanyane Director of African Relations in South Africa’S Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
8/13/201558 minutes, 33 seconds
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Womens Day

53 years ago women from all walks of life made their way to the Union Building in Pretoria to protest against the extension of government regulations to African women concerning the carrying of passes; they were led by Lillian Ngoyi, Helen Joseph, Sophia Williams and Rahima Moosa. Therefore South Africa celebrates the month of August as Women's month. And also the declaration of the African Union that saw the year 2015 declared as the year of women empowerment. But women around the world still face numerous challenges, ranging from lack of representation in high senior position in big corporates and government departments. However there are also many challenges women face when it comes to marriage and marriage practices. The challenges are sometimes supported by our very own African culture. We can even go to the bible where Apostle Paul says when he was talking to the Church in Corinth. 1st Corinthians versus 14 to 35 "Women should remain silent in the churches. They are not allowed to speak, but must be in submission, as the law says. If they want to inquire about something, they should ask their own husbands at home; for it is disgraceful for a woman to speak in the church" So clearly the challenges are deeper than one can think. To help us analyse the situation we have Professor Tom Sengani Associate Professor in Discourse Analysis, at the University of South Africa, Tsholofelo Sesanga, Community Interventions Manager at the Centre of the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, and Advocate Sabelo Sibanda, Founder: The School of African Awareness and Ama-Africa-Aqotho:
8/12/201557 minutes, 23 seconds
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Tradition vs Modernism

53 years ago women from all walks of life made their way to the Union Building in Pretoria to protest against the extension of government regulations to African women concerning the carrying of passes; they were led by Lillian Ngoyi, Helen Joseph, Sophia Williams and Rahima Moosa. Therefore South Africa celebrates the month of August as Women's month. And also the declaration of the African Union that saw the year 2015 declared as the year of women empowerment. But women around the world still face numerous challenges, ranging from lack of representation in high senior position in big corporates and government departments. However there are also many challenges women face when it comes to marriage and marriage practices. The challenges are sometimes supported by our very own African culture. We can even go to the bible where Apostle Paul says when he was talking to the Church in Corinth. 1st Corinthians versus 14 to 35 "Women should remain silent in the churches. They are not allowed to speak, but must be in submission, as the law says. If they want to inquire about something, they should ask their own husbands at home; for it is disgraceful for a woman to speak in the church" So clearly the challenges are deeper than one can think. To help us analyse the situation we have Professor Tom Sengani Associate Professor in Discourse Analysis, at the University of South Africa, Tsholofelo Sesanga, Community Interventions Manager at the Centre of the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, and Advocate Sabelo Sibanda, Founder: The School of African Awareness and Ama-Africa-Aqotho:
8/12/201557 minutes, 23 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
8/11/201553 minutes, 18 seconds
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Western Sahara

Western Sahara is a disputed territory on the northwest coast of Africa bordered by Morocco, Mauritania, and Algeria. After Spain withdrew from its former colony of Spanish Sahara in 1976, Morocco annexed the northern two-thirds of Western Sahara and claimed the rest of the territory in 1979, following Mauritania's withdrawal. A guerrilla war with the Polisario Front contesting Morocco's sovereignty ended in a 1991 cease-fire and the establishment of a UN peacekeeping operation. As part of this effort, the UN sought to offer a choice to the peoples of the Western Sahara between independence, favored by the Polisario Front, or integration into Morocco. A proposed referendum never took place due to lack of agreement on voter eligibility. To help us unpack this we are now joined on the line by:.Maya Schkolne: Research Associate at the Afro Middle East Centre She is busy writing a book on Western Sahara Mr Jose Nascimento: A South African human rights lawyer who has been involved in promoting certain causes such as East Timor, Burma, and the Western Sahara. In 1999 he was an international electoral observer for the UN referendum in East Timor and was also an electoral observer during the last South African elections. Many of his cases have been reported in the local and international media and he has received a number of international awards. He is also currently working on a book on the Western SaharaMs Sacha Knox: A research specialist in the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA) programme of the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC). She is situated within the Governance and Security Unit where she has been working on the question of the Western Sahara. Mr Itani Rasalanavho: An international aspects and solidarity officer for the Young Communist League in South Africa, Johannesburg District. He is also coordinator for a newly formed International Solidarity Network and works actively on the Western Sahara
8/6/201555 minutes, 18 seconds
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Breastfeeding week

The World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) is the greatest outreach vehicle for the breastfeeding movement being celebrated in over 120 countries. Officially it is celebrated from 1 - 7 August. Breastfeeding has an important link to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which are meant to be achieved in 2015. Although poverty has gone down, 1 in 8 people still go to bed hungry. To assist us on this program:• Jane Pitt, former nurse, midwife and lactation consultant ( • Elizabeth Brierley (pronounced Bryley), Director of Milk Matters, a breast milk bank. • Tshililo Mashamba, gynecologist • Anne Moosa, mother.
8/4/201557 minutes, 32 seconds
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Greece

The main Greece’s stock index, the Athens, has fallen by 22.87% as trading resumes after a five-week closure. The country's top four lenders were the biggest fallers, all down by 30%. Banks make up about a fifth of the index. Traders had predicted sharp losses as a result of pent-up trading. Earlier last month, the International Monetary Fund and Greece's other creditors, the European Central Bank and European Commission, approved a new 95 billion dollars bailout program for Athens in exchange for painful budget cuts, tax increases and economic reforms. The 11th-hour agreement appeared to avert Greece's potential exit from the Eurozone, and could allow it to make billions of dollars in debt repayments as soon as this month.To assist us on this program,• Dr Peter Karungu: African Economic Expert: • Elizabeth Sidiropoulos: Chief Executive of the South African Institute of International Relations: • Annabel Bishop: Investec Chief Economist: And Brooks Spector : Associate Editor at the Daily Maverick and a retired American Diplomat
8/3/201556 minutes, 29 seconds
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DIRCO Institutions

South Africa’s department of International Relations and Cooperation has launched two institutions that will form part of their foreign policy organs. These two institutions are the South African Council of International Relations and the Association of Former Ambassadors, High Commissioners and Chief Representatives. Today on our program we will try to dissect these two institutions and analyze their function. To assist us on this program,• Mr Aziz Pahad, the former deputy minster of foreign affairs• Dennis George, the General Secretary of the Federation of Unions of South Africa (FEDUSA) • Nozipho January-Bardill, Non-Executive Director Anglogold Ashanti Limited
7/30/201556 minutes, 50 seconds
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Peacekeeping in Africa

The first Annual Peacekeeping Africa conference draws to a close this morning in Gallagher Estate in Johannesburg, South Africa. The conference is looking at peacekeeping operations and developments on the African Continent, harmonizing civil and military personnel through training to ensure a working relationship. It was officially opened by Martin Kobler, who serves as a Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary General Assistance Mission for Iraq. African Union and United Nations Ambassadors also are attending. To discuss this very important topic on the continent, radio presenter and journalist, Benjamin Moshatama.Charles Adu- Brempong: Course Director (Crisis Information Management &Integrated; Civ-Mil Coordination Courses) of KOFI ANNAN INTERNATIONAL PEACE KEEPING TRAINING CENTRELivhu Mathoho: Defence Analyst: DEFENCE DECISION SUPPORT INSTITUTE, ADIVISION OF the Armaments Corporation of South Africa (ARMSCOR)Andre Roux, Conflict Management & Peace building Expert
7/29/201557 minutes, 14 seconds
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Obama's East African Visit

During his first visit to Ethiopia yesterday, United States (US) President Barack Obama met with the country’s Prime Minister, Haelemariam Desalegn. Obama addressed issues that he was expected to by the media and analysts; focusing on security and the threat of the Islamist militant group al-Shabaab in Somalia. Obama, arrived in Kenya on Sunday, where he focused on improving business ties with Africa. Today, on African Dialogue we look at bilateral relationship between Africa and the United States of America during the presidency of Barack Obama.To assist us on this topic we have: • Tom Wheeler, a foreign policy analyst.• J. Brooks Spector, associate editor of Daily Maverick• R. Courtney Priester, Past Chair of the Democrats Abroad South Africa
7/28/201555 minutes, 35 seconds
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Burndi Election Outcome

Burundi’s electoral commission announced this past weekend that Pierre Nkurunziza has won a controversial term as president of Burundi, garnering almost 70% of the vote. The main opposition leader Agathon Rwasa denounced the win and demanded for fresh elections.Rwasa’s name remained on the ballot paper despite boycotting the poll with other three main rivals. International observers, including the US State Department and the European Union have said the elections were not free and fair. Critics said that the government harassed opposition supporters over the past few months, and at least 70 people have been killed in protests since the president announced in April that he was running for a third term. On this topic we were joined by Benjamin Chemouni from the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Bernard Bankukira who is Channel Africa’s Correspondent based in Bujumbura, Burundia and Kwezi Mqcibisa: Coordinator at the South African-Based organization, ACCORD and Amnesty Internatiuonal’s Sarah Jackson. They were speaking to journalist and presenter. Benjamin Moshatama
7/27/201557 minutes, 26 seconds
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Judiciary and the Government

There has recently been a conversation on the separation of powers. Recently the decision was made by parliament was made to give limited access . There has been criticism from Blade Nzimande, who has recently announced the convening of a summit to discuss the judiciary. Recently, we have heard Thandi Modise, chairperson of the National Council of Provinces, is taking up an earlier Western Cape High Court ruling that set aside her ruling she made in Parliament last year against the Economic Freedom Fighters on the Marikana issue. Modise asked in her application to the Constitutional Court that the court should, inter alia, give clarity on the extent to which courts may interfere in decisions of presiding officers in Parliament. Clearly we are seeing a division in terms of separation of powers in the judicial and the system of governance in South Africa.To help us talk more about this we are joined on the line by:• Raymond Louw, the Deputy Chairperson of the Media Freedom Committee • • Professor Mtende Mhango, the Deputy Head of Wits School of Law • • Moloto Mothapo, Parliamentary Spokesperson of the South African parliament
7/23/201557 minutes, 46 seconds
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Human Rights

South African apartheid human rights lawyer, Advocate George Bizo, s has urged human rights defenders in Swaziland not to resort to violence in seeking transformation. Bizos was part of delegates who attended the welcoming ceremony of two Swazi human rights activists hosted by South Africa's Lawyers for Human Rights in Pretoria recently. Human rights lawyer Thulani Maseko and co-activist, Bheki Makhubu were released from prison after serving time for being vocal about human rights violations by the Swazi monarch and his government. Their predicament is not an isloated case, as there are human right activists in several African countries who are also being attacked and silenced. To look at the situation more closely we spoke to one fo the Swazi activists - Thulani Maseko; Dewa Mavhinga - Senior Researcher at Human Rights Watch , and Sipho Gumede, former Secratary General of Lawyers for Human Rights in Swaziland: They were speaking to Benjamin Moshatama.
7/22/201523 minutes, 58 seconds
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BRICS Feedback

The Brics group of emerging economies has launched its New Development Bank in Shanghai. The bank is backed by Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, collectively known as Brics countries. The institution will lend money6 to developing countries to help finance infrastructure projects. It is also an alternative to the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, although the group says it is not a rival. Today on the program we will be looking at what South African business leaders and business in general could leverage from the Brics Bank. We are joined by:Mr Sandile Zungu, Executive Chairman ZICO Investment Holding and also a Member of the SA Chapter BRICS Business Council.Khathutshelo Ramukumba CEO of NYDA (National Youth Development Agency)Peggy Drotsky – Chief Executive of the South African Chamber of CommerceSoren Ambrose Head of Policy Research and Advocacy at Action Aid in Kenya
7/21/201556 minutes, 45 seconds
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Nelson Mandela International Day

Nelson Mandela International Day was launched in recognition of Nelson Mandela's birthday on 18 July, 2009 via unanimous decision of the UN General Assembly. It was inspired by a call Nelson Mandela made a year earlier, for the next generation to take on the burden of leadership in addressing the world's social injustices when he said that "it is in your hands now". It is more than a celebration of Madiba's life and legacy. It is a global movement to honour his life's work and act to change the world for the better. The elderly statesman once said ""When a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace. I believe I have made that effort and that is, therefore, why I will sleep for the eternity." We also know that our very own station Channel Africa will be doing their bid to make a difference in the lives of the less fortunate. Our team of journalist and producers will be starting up a vegetable garden at the Carl Sithole Centre in Soweto. To tel us about the reason for the day and some events happening we have :1. Mamolefe Segakweng Marketing ManagerChannel Africa 2. Carmen Nottingham Founder: Fertilis3. Yase GodloManager: Outreach and Mandela Day Nelson Mandela Foundation4. ManushaPillaiGeneral Manager: Communications Brand South Africa
7/16/201550 minutes, 48 seconds
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Burundi Analysis

The government of Burundi has confirmed the new date for presidential elections. Burundians will now go to the polls on the 21st of this month. This was after intervention fron the East Africa Community delegation that was dispatched to Bujumbura early this week. Mediators of the United Nations and the African Union had also requested its suspension. The capital, Bujumbura has been rocked with by weeks of protests following President Pierre Nkurunziza's bid to run for a third term in office. In New York, the United Nations Security Council has welcomed the postponement of the elections and has urged all political parties to reach a agreement on a new electoral timetable. The council has also called for the reinstatement of private media and protection of human rights. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by:Bernard Bankukira: Channel Africa Correspondent based in Burundi: Jean-Marie Fardeau: Senior Researcher at Human Rights Watch based in France:Martin Chungong: The Inter Parliamentary Union Secretary General Benjamin Chemouni, of the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science
7/15/201558 minutes, 17 seconds
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Durban International festival

This week sees the start of the Durban International Film Festival in South Africa. The event will celebrate its 36th edition and runs from 16 to 26 of July. This years festival will see presentations over 290 screenings of current films from around the world, with strong focus on South African and African cinema. 50 filmmakers from Africa are going to take part. The film indusrty on the continent seem to be dominated by those with the best economies such as Nigeria, Egypt and South Africa. To help us look at the industry more closely we have Toni Monty Head of the Durban Film office at the Durban Filmmart, Naomi Mokhele, Manager of Communications at the National Film and Video Foundation, and Ramadan Suleman , Spokesperson of Rights of Passage - the incubation project featuring 8 young first-time filmakers:
7/14/201557 minutes, 43 seconds
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UN statistics

The recent UN statistics reveal that by the year 2040, Africa will have two billion people living on the continent and will a home of two out of five of the young people in the world. This shows that a lot of investment and development needs to be focused on the youth population as a future venture. Yaya Toure, the Ivorian professional footballer, this past Friday wrote an article focusing on youth development in Africa published by the Guardian, partnering up with the Bill Melinda Foundation. Toure say that "young minds must be fed.Girls and boys must have equal access to decent primary and secondary schooling, learning numeracy, literacy and IT skills that we'd all expect for our children. Many are forced to leave school too early - wasting their potential before it has even begun." To look at this subject we have partnered up with the African Leadership Academy:with us we have Sharmi Surianarain: who is currently the Director of Lifelong Engagement at the African Leadership Academy, leading the effort to reconnect ALA graduates to each other, to ALA, and to Africa, and Alexia Paradzai: who was born in Zimbabwe and lived in the small town of Chiredzi for most of her life. Her father works as a freelance hunter and her mother is a house wife. She is currently working on a project she started (AfroFresco) and the hope is to make the arts interesting and relevant to more Zimbabweans. AfroFresco is a platform to introduce more people to Zimbabwean arts using social media and public spaces:
7/13/201559 minutes, 49 seconds
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Population in Africa

According to a new UN report, titled Generation 2030, there are currently, 1.2 billion people living on the continent, which is five times more than the population in the continent in 1950. The report projects that by the year 2050, Africa’s population will double to 2.4 billion. As much as this population growth can create possibilities for the continent it also poses a huge challenge for African governments to design efficient national and social development planning systems to deal with these populations. To assist us on this: • Professor Clifford Odimegwu from the Department of Demography and Population Studies, at the University of Witwatersrand. • Dr. Richmond Tiemoko, Population and Development Adviser, UNFPA Regional Office, South Africa (speaking to us from New York City)
7/9/201557 minutes, 7 seconds
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BRICS Summit

The BRICS Summit kicks off today, as more delegates started trickling in from yesterday as the South African delegation lead by President Jacob Zuma arrived in Ufa, in Russia. This year’s summit, which will be hosted by the President of the Russian Federation, will go under the theme “BRICS Partnership – a Powerful Factor of Global Development. Held only for two days, the summit will also see the launch of the New Development Bank, which is aimed at minimizing the monopoly of western financial institutions.To assist us look at this gathering we are joined by: • Dr Jaya Josie, who is the head of the BRICS research Centre within the Human Sciences Research Council • Dr Dikshita Padalkar, an expert on economic development from the Padalkar Research Resources
7/8/201557 minutes, 21 seconds
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Transport Conference

The 34th Southern African Transport Conference supported by the South African Department of Transport and the Transportation Research Board of the United States, kicks off this morning until Thursday at the CSIR International Convention Centre, Pretoria, South Africa. The theme of the conference is “Transport: Working together to Deliver”. It’s said to be reflecting the importance of transport in fostering employment and economic growth. The conference will focus on how to optimally engage all stakeholders involved in the transport sector to provide effective and efficient transportation solutions and to improve service delivery in order to better respond as a sector to the needs of all users of our transport systems. To help us unpack some of the key issues to be discussed in the next 4 days, we are joined by: Professor Wynand Steyn: Southern African Transport Conference ChairpersonDr Peter Sweatman – Professor at the Transport Research Institute, University of Michigan
7/7/201555 minutes, 43 seconds
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Marikana Analysis

Almost three years have passed since 34 men were shot dead on a hillside in Marikana, South Africa, after asking for a living wage. To explain how so many people could be gunned down in broad daylight the inquiry needed to probe the platinum belt. Each of the miners had a name, a family and a story to tell, a past and a future. Two week ago, the findings of Judge Ian Farlam's judicial inquiry into the killings were finally made public. Most of the families missed the start of a speech by South African president, Jacob Zuma, because the government hadn't bothered to give them proper notice that a statement was imminent. Today we look at labour trends in the mining industry, specifically, human rights issues. To help us we have Advocate Johan Kruger: Director of the Centre for Constitutional Rights operating as a unit of the F.W. De Klerk Foundation and Noel Kututwa: Deputy Director at Amnesty International, Southern Africa:
7/6/201556 minutes, 37 seconds
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The Freedom Charter

This past Monday, South Africans gathered in the historic surburb of Kliptown gathered to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the Freedom Charter.. The Freedom Charter which was adopted by the African National Congress (ANC) during the struggle against apartheid and was a document which contained core values and principles which demanded equity and equality for all South Africans. However, during these celebrations many bemoaned that few of the clauses contained in the document have not been fulfilled, in the post-apartheid period experienced by South Africa. Looking at the African context, even after years of decolonisation and after the founding fathers established the Organisation for African Unity which was aimed at promoting unity amongst independent African states and to advance economic development on the continent, we aske the question has Africa realised the aspiration of its founding fathers: Kwame Nkrumah, Emperor Haille Sellaisse and Jomo Kenyatta. To help us on this topic we are joined by: • Prof. Sitwala Imenda, Executive Dean of Education, at the University of Kwazulu Natal: • Ibrahim Fakir (Manager of Governance Institutions and Processes at the Electoral Institute for the Sustainability of Democracy in Africa (EISA) Levy Ndou, lecturer of Political Science at the Tshwane University of Technology:
7/1/201557 minutes, 14 seconds
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African Dialogue

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
6/30/201557 minutes, 58 seconds
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African Dream Summit

“A Freaking Dream” that was the phrase that took precedence at the recent African Dream Summit that took place in Johannesburg South Africa. The aim was to spur The African Dream Movement into action to define and shape “The African Dream that will change the narrative from that of a Dark Continent, to that of prosperity, hope and accomplishment. The Summit aims to use entrepreneurship as a tool to Champion a new mantra of “African Success” through a new vision of “The African Dream”. Attendees had an opportunity to engage with a panel of thought-leaders and like- minded industry leaders in redefining and shaping The African dream to move towards self-healing and positive Brand Africa. The summit provided a game changing dialogue and the inspiration to shape an action-driven sustainable African Dream. To help us delve into the conversation we are joined by:Our guests are still on the line to further unpack this issue with us:1. Rejoice Nxumalo Chairperson: South African Association of Investors 2. Jabulani Tsambo (HHP) Rapper/Musician and Pan-Africanist 3. Adv Sabelo Sibanda Human Rights and Criminal Law Expert4. Scholastica Sylvan Kimaryo Founder: Kilimanjaro Conscious Leadership Institute5. Sello Maake Ka Ncube Legendary Actor
6/29/201556 minutes, 40 seconds
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Omar Al-Bashir court ruling

After days of wrangling to try and have him arrested the Sudanese president, Omar al-Bashir, left South Africa before a court here could decide whether to arrest him. The International Criminal Court has been trying for years, to have al-Bashir apprehended since charging him with the commission of atrocities against civilians in Darfur, which resulted in the deaths of over 300 thousand people. He has flouted the ICC’s arrest warrant since it was issued in 2009, blithely travelling throughout Africa and the Middle East despite a United Nations Security Council resolution that requires all states to co-operate with the ICC. There were some signs that this time, things might be different. As soon as he arrived in Johannesburg, the South African Litigation Centre submitted an urgent request for his arrest, and ICC judge Cano Tarfusseremphasized that there was “no ambiguity or uncertainty” to this obligation – something of which the South African authorities were already well aware. To help us unpack this issue, we are now joined on the line by: Professor ShadrackGutto: Legal Academic Professor based at the University of South Africa Angela Mudukuti :Lawyer at The Southern African Litigation Centre Netsanet Belay, Amnesty International's Research and Advocacy Director
6/25/201553 minutes, 32 seconds
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Sustainability Week Part Two

On the program today, we will be looking at the second day of the Sustainability Week currently underway at the Centre for Scientific and Industrial Research in the Capital City of Tshwane here in South Africa. To help us carry on our debate about Sustainable cities, we have:Jaisheila Rajput Founder and CEO of Tommorrow Maters Now , developing economic models for sustainability and transforming the way we do businessPeter Newman is the Professor of Sustainability at Curtin University, and a speaker at the eventMs Dorah Nteo , Strategic Executive Director - Green Economy – at the Tshwane Executive Mayor’s Office.
6/24/201555 minutes, 10 seconds
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Life 2 Green

Advancing the Green Economy through the sharing of knowledge across disciplines and sectors, and by actively seeking to accelerate the total number of projects undertaken under the heading of sustainability, Sustainability Week In South Africa will once again prove to have a catalytic effect. Where government officials, private sector investors, business operators, professionals, researchers, and NGO’s converge to engage on this critically important, and most fundamental consideration – sustainability. Hosted by the City of Tshwane and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research - CSIR – the event and Expo also consists of many delegates from across Africa – who will look at how the continent can improve the Sustainability of its cities. To help us look more closely at some of the discussion points we have :Llewellyn van Wyk is an expert on the construction sector, with the CSIRBlessing Manale City of Tshwane Spokesperson,Usile Ndlovu – From the Sustainability Energy Forum
6/23/201558 minutes, 19 seconds
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Society and Energy

Civil Society and unions of South Africa met recently to discuss the electricity shortage in the country, and debated various aspects on the implications of the problem. While many called for the South African electricity public utility, Eskom, to be inclusive in discussions to solving the problem, the ousted Secretary General of the Congress of Trade Unions, Zwelinzima Vavi, called for a mass protest campaign against South Africa’s power crisis. The various stakeholders in civil society gathered at the conference under the theme “Will This Be a Winter Without Power?”To look at what views came out of the conference we are joined by: • Ted Blom, Partner of Blom Consulting and Training . (He was at the conference looking at: The roots of the Eskom crisis and the need for a judicial enquiry) • Nombulelo Nyathela, spokesperson from Equal Education. (She delivered a presentation looking at the theme Electricity supply to schools. How outages and inadequate electricity infrastructure affect learning and teaching) • Lerato Maregele, Earthlife Africa Johannesburg's Programme Officer. (She was speaking on Eskom and Environmental Injustice)
6/22/201557 minutes, 47 seconds
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National Development Plan 2030

The Emperors Palace in Kempton park near Johannesburg South Africa was recently the host of the NDP Vision 2030 conference. Members of the Presidency, key government dignitaries and private sector leaders were invited to share insights, and engage and discuss the vision for South Africa’s National Dvelopment Plan. The focus was to unpack key aspects around Vision 2030 and how key organisations and individuals can contribute to make it a reality. The NDP aims to eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030. According to the plan, South Africa can realise these goals by drawing on the energies of its people, growing an inclusive economy, building capabilities, enhancing the capacity of the state, and promoting leadership and partnerships throughout society. To help us look at the topics of discussion we have :Khandani Misibi, Director of Sechaba Medical Solutions Graham Block , Eudcation Analyst at Wits University in Johannesburg .And Nonkululeko Sindane, Director General of South Africa’s Department of Justice and Constitution .
6/18/201559 minutes, 26 seconds
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The 25th African Union Summit

The 25th African Union Summit has been underway this week in Johannesburg, and this coming weekend more than fifty African heads of state and government, under the chairmanship of Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe, to preside over a tough program. The president’s of the continent will meet at the Sandton Convention Centre, and from Sunday to Sunday will embark on the 25th Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the Union, to look at various issues ranging from the political crisis in Burundi, the terrorism problem on the continent and Agenda 2063. To look at the African Union Summit we spoke to: • Dr Justina Dugbazah is the Anglophone project manager for the Nepad Spanish Fund for African Women ‘s Empowerment• • Liesel Louw-Vaudran, consultant for the Institute for Security Studies • • Dr Abdo Lo, General Manager of Primmum Africa Consulting,
6/12/201558 minutes, 28 seconds
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AIDS Conference

Scientists, medical professionals, researchers, government leaders and those living with HIV/AIDS have gathered in Durban this week to look at ways to further fight against the epidemic. They are meeting at the 7th SA Aids conference which started on Monday. HIV/AIDS is still a challenge in the country, with 18 percent of the world’s HIV positive population. To look at the happenings at the conference we have on the line:• Yogan Pillay is Deputy Director General of South Africa’s health department • Professor Francois Venter is Conference Co chair and Deputy Director of Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute (RHI) • Dr Nono Simelela is the Conference Chair
6/11/201557 minutes, 13 seconds
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Social Discourse on Electricity

Civil Society and unions of South Africa met last week to discuss the electricity shortage in the country, and debated various aspects on the implications of the problem. While many called for the South African electricity public utility, Eskom, to be inclusive in discussions to solving the problem, the ousted Secretary General of the Congress of Trade Unions, Zwelinzima Vavi, called for a mass protest campaign against South Africa’s power crisis. The various stakeholders in civil society gathered at the conference under the theme “Will This Be a Winter Without Power?”To look at what views came out of the conference we are joined by: • Ted Blom, Partner of Blom Consulting and Training . (He was at the conference looking at: The roots of the Eskom crisis and the need for a judicial enquiry) • Nombulelo Nyathela, spokesperson from Equal Education. (She delivered a presentation looking at the theme Electricity supply to schools. How outages and inadequate electricity infrastructure affect learning and teaching) • Lerato Maregele, Earthlife Africa Johannesburg's Programme Officer. (She was speaking on Eskom and Environmental Injustice)
6/10/201559 minutes, 2 seconds
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African Kings Forum

His Majesty Inkosi YamaKhosi Dr Melizwe Dlamini the third, Monarch of the Nhlangwini Dlamini Nation S.A based in La Lucia in Kwazulu Natal, South Africa is calling for the formation of the Forum for African Kings to add impetus into the initiatives that have been started by the South African Government and the African Union. To help us unpack this we are now joined on the line by: His Majesty Inkosi YamaKhosi Dr Melizwe Dlamini lllMonarch of the Nhlangwini Dlamini Nation S.A: Kgoshi Setlamorago Thobejane : President of the Congress of Traditional Leaders. Professor Lesiba Teffo: Attached to the University of South Africa: Professor Herbert Vilakazi, Chairperson of the Vilakazi Development Stratergies Organisation
6/9/201557 minutes, 54 seconds
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Nigeria

Nigeria’s President, Muhammadu Buhari was inaugurated last month in what some analysts have hailed as remarkable. His address highlighted points of engagement of the new administration in tackling national issues ranging from security, unemployment to power shortages. On our program this morning, we will be unpacking what the new administration is going to be grappling with going forward. And to help us with that we are now joined on the line by:Richard Iroana: Political Analyst based at the University of PretoriaMartin Ewi: Senior Researcher at the Institute for Security Studies based in Pretoria Dr Oladiran Bello: Programme Head, Governance of Africa’s Resources Programme at the South African Institute of International Affairs
6/8/201559 minutes, 31 seconds
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Young Entrepeneurship

The third installment of Transnet Young Entrepreneurs Conference & Expo is just a few days away. The event takes place on the 4 – 5 June 2015 at President Hotel in Bloemfontein. The event is going to host some of the successful entrepreneurs in South Africa. About 30 speakers will grace our stage at the Transnet Young Entrepreneurs Conference and Expo 2015.Our guests to take this conversation further are:• Miss Matefo Morakeng - CEO (Chief Events Organisor) M3 Marketing • Dr. Thabo Pitse - "Former Medical Doctor" Business Consultant for the University of the Free State & Entrepreneur.• Neo Masithela. CEO of Kgora investment,
6/3/201558 minutes, 2 seconds
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Junior Mining Indaba

South Africa and other Africa countries have the challenge in diversifying its economies and being driven by large scale projects, ignoring potential in smaller sections of industries. One of the sectors that can be sidelined is junior mining; however international mining economies have created opportunities in its junior sector. The Resources 4 Africa 2015 Junior Indaba, starts today in Johannesburg and will bring together investors, project owners and CEOs in one room to look at global solutions to deal with the global capital crisis which affects the sector. The Junior Indaba will also be looking at how international mining economies have created a thriving junior sector. Our guests to take this conversation further are:1. Paul Miller Investment Banker at (Mining and Metals)Nedbank Capital 2. Ido Lekota Director: Marketing and public Relations Lerama Resources (Junior Mining Company)3. OtsileMatlou Director of Mining ENSAfrica
6/2/201559 minutes, 46 seconds
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PAP

The Pan African Parliament will soon become a full legislative body as envisioned by the Protocol to the Treaty establishing the African Economic Community relating to PAP. This continental parliament was established in 2004 as a consultative body to the African Union and its founding members said it will given full legislative powers in five year. Most this parliament is being dismissed as a toothless body. But its new president Roger Nkodo Dang from Cameroon says his mission is to lead the transition of the parliament for it to tackle the challenges facing Africa:
5/28/201558 minutes, 23 seconds
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Rhino Update

The recent devastating news from South Africa’s Environment Minster Edna Molewa was that by the end of April 2015, the number of rhinos lost to poachers nearly reached 400, and half of them where poached at the Kruger National Park. In response to this the South African government is considering selling off its stockpile as an attempt of slowing down rhino poaching in the country. Molewa said a committee of inquiry she had set up was tasked with considering the feasibility of a proposal for the legalisation of a trade in rhino horn at the 17th CITES meeting.John Hanks, author of the recent book, Operation Lock and the War on Rhino Poaching. He has been a conservationist for the past 30 years probably knows more than most about the rhino issue. He is in favour of legalised trade in rhino hornAllison Thomson heads up an organisation called Outraged South African Citizens Against Poaching (OSCAP)Perlham Jones, from the Private Rhino Owners Association.
5/27/201557 minutes, 48 seconds
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African Business and Agricultural Forum

The African Union Commission (AUC) has deemed 2015 as the “Year of Women’s Empowerment and Development towards Africa’s Agenda 2063”. Women in agriculture in Africa, predominantly small-scale farmers form more than 50% of the agricultural activity, producing about 60-70% of the food in the continent. While women provide the majority of the labour in agricultural production, their access and control over productive resources is greatly constrained due to inequalities constructed by patriarchal norms. The Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) will be hosting their 11th Partnership Platform (PP) which will focus on addressing these issues, delivering measureable results and impact around areas of commitment and action moving forward.Today we speak to: Professor Sihawukele Ngubani, Vice Chairperson for the African Festival (SA) Geoffrey Raymond, Inventor from the Nelson Mandela Institute of Science and Technology (Tanzania) (Invented a medical machine ) Ernest Boateng: CEO South Africa Entrepreneurship. Pam Goldstone – Owner of Amdokwe Visions, and represented the youth.
5/26/201556 minutes, 50 seconds
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Africa International Unity Renaissance Conference

The Human Sciences Research Council together with its partners is holding its 5th African Unity for Renaissance Conference and Africa Day this morning at the Kara Heritage Institute in Pretoria, South Africa. There has been a series of conferences that continued from Friday until today. The African Unity for Renaissance conference have become flagship events of the African Institute of Southern Africa and have over the years been important annual gathering of African scholars to explore and propose ideas for a peaceful and prosperous Africa. To look at this auspicious occasion in Africa’s historical calendar, we are joined in studio here at the Kara Heritage Institute in Pretoria by:Frank Lekaba – Junior Researcher at the Human Science Research Council (HSRC)Sandile Mamella – Spokesperson for South Africa’s Department of Arts and CultureDr Motole Motsheka - Founder of the Kara Heritage Institute Dr Berhanykun Andemicael Writer and African International Relations SpecialistSouth African Singer Simphiwe Dana
5/25/201558 minutes, 36 seconds
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Media Freedom

Early this month, media organisations around the world called on governments to protect freedom of expression and protection of the media. On World Press Day, the call laid out in a letter organised by Press Freedom organisation PEN International and signed more than twenty of its regional centers. Countries which are weighed down by dictatorship, civil tension and terrorism the voices of journalists are oppressed. Countries like South Africa suffer from a pluralistic media, owned mainly by foreign funders, seems to pose the challenge of a unilateral conversation that seems to be coming out from the media, especially in the newspaper outlets. And grassroots media struggles to tell a different perspective due to lack of funding and little investment. To look at various issues, which reflect Media Transformation in South Africa, we will be speaking to: • The Chairperson, Phelisa Nkomo. • CEO Dudu Nchoba Mazibuko-
5/21/201557 minutes, 36 seconds
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Burundi

Burundi’s President Pierre Nkurunziza made his first public appearance in the capital Bujumbura yesterday. This is after his government experienced an attempted coup last week, which failed after many days of youths protesting. In his appearance President Nkurunziza sent a warning of a threat posed by Al-Shabaab, the Somali islamist group. Burundi has plunged into crisis after Mr Nkurunziza said he has seeking a third term of office. Critics said the move would be unconstitutional, and there have been almost daily protests since Mr Nkurunziza’s announcement, stirring memories of an ethnically driven civil war that ended a decade agoNow to take a look at this phenomenon we have on the line: • Bernard Bankukira: Radio News Producer: Radio Isanganiro: • Dr Phil Clarke: Lecturer in Comparative and International Politics: University of London• Carina Tertsakian: Human Rights Watch: Senior Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch • Yolanda Bouka: Researcher: Institute for Security Studies based in Nairobi, Kenya.
5/18/201558 minutes, 18 seconds
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European Union - Africa migration

According to latest reports, Britain's Home Secretary Theresa May suggested that economic migrants who have been rescued from the Mediterranean trying to reach to Europe should be returned home. This statement comes after a UK warship rescued up to 450 people from the Mediterranean yesterday. It has been estimated by the United Nations that up to 60 000 people have tried to cross the Mediterranean from North Africa this year. It has also been stated that the deaths of people drowning during these crossings has increased 20 fold from 2014 - with more than 1, 800 migrants estimated to have died. Now to take a look at this phenomenon we have on the line: • Tina Ghelli, Senior Regional External Relations Officer from the United Nations Refugee Agency • Joel Millman, the Press Officer at the International Organisation for Migration
5/14/201556 minutes, 15 seconds
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WORLD NURSES DAY

International Nurses Day (IND) is celebrated around the world on 12 May of each year, to mark the contributions nurses make to society. The day marks the birth anniversary of Florence Nightingale, who is known as the founder of modern nursing. The day has been celebrated since 1965. The theme for this year's Nurses Day is "Nurses: A Force for Change: Care Effective, Cost Effective".To help us look at the significance of Nurses:Ms Thandi Manganye (Acting CEO & Registrar for South African Nursing Council Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa’s First Deputy President, Letsatsi Modise
5/13/201556 minutes, 49 seconds
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Euthanasia

The organisation Dignity South Africa has welcomed the North Gauteng High Court ruling allowing a Cape Town advocate to commit medically assisted suicide as the first step towards legalising euthanasia in the country. Willem Landman, the CEO of the Ethics Institute of South Africa and a member of Dignity SA, said the court order was only confined to the specific case of Robert Stransham-Ford, but would make it much easier for others who wanted to follow in his footsteps.Because parliament has not yet decided to adopt the draft legislation on euthanasia, other dying patients in similar circumstances would still have to approach the court for an order to allow them to commit assisted suicide.Not knowing at the time that Stransham-Ford had died, Landman described Judge Hans Fabricius' ruling as a huge victory for Stransham-Ford and for Dignity SA, a non-profit organisation which advocates the legalisation of assisted suicide. The debate about legalising Euthinasia has continued to make headlines. To help us discuss the different views, we have Advocate Mthunzi Mhaga, Spokesperson of South Africa's Department of Justice, Professor Sylvester Chima, Associate Professor, at the University of Kwazulu Natal, Colleges of Head Sciences. Lee Last, Executive Member of Dignity South Africa and Arch Bishop Stephen Zondo Founder and leader of the church, Rivers of Living Waters Ministries:
5/12/201555 minutes, 49 seconds
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Utility Week

Cape Town, South Africa, will host the global meeting which brings up to five thousand power and utility professionals under one roof. Not only will the delegates come from African countries but it will also enable them to interact with experts from outside the continent. The 15th annual African Utility Week and Clean Power Africa is the largest utilities conference and exhibition which explores business opportunities, and features trade shows, and power exhibition amongst other things. To help look at what this is all about, we are joined on the line by: • Nicolette Pombo van Zyl: Program Advisor for the Annual African Utility Week and Editor of ESI-Africa, a magazine specializing in the Energy Industry:• Melusi Maposa : Engineer at Accenture Smart Grid Services:
5/11/201556 minutes, 4 seconds
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Professsor Ali Mazrui

The life and work of Professsor Ali Mazrui was celebrated this week in an event which brought together intellectuals and scholars from across the continent. This included the former first lady of South Africa, Zanele Mbeki, amongst other high profile leaders. The event was organised by South Africa's University of Johannesburg and The Citizen newspaper. The panel included Abdul Bemath, an indexer of Professor Mazrui's work, Professors Gilbert Khadigala and Sabelo Ndlovu-Gatsheni, as well as the globally acclaimed Dr. Adekeye Adebajo. In their speeches, it was not only Ali Mazrui's work that was discussed, but also the strides he made in the field of both African and Islamic studies. To speak to us on this great African scholar have on the line: • Abdul Bemath, Editor and Bibliographer, The Mazruina Collection Revisited: Annotated Bibliography of Ali Mazrui, 1962-2003; - Contact • Professor Sabelo Ndlovu, Professor and Head of the Archie Mafeje Research Institute at the University of South Africa (UNISA). - • Izak Khomo, journalist, presenter and producer for Channel Africa's Spotlight Africa
5/7/201559 minutes, 5 seconds
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Africa Health Conference

The largest healthcare exhibition is currently underway in Johannesburg, South Africa, which will attract over seven thousand healthcare professionals. Africa Health is hosting up to five hundred of key players in the health industry internationally from healthcare suppliers, manufacturers and service providers. On the sidelines of the exhibition there will be conference talks which will focus on nursing, human rights and medical law and sports medicine and rehabilitation. Now crossing live to Africa Health, we have on the line: • Lisa Stevens, Executive Director of Informal Life Sciences Exhibitions and Organiser of the 2015 Africa Health Exhibition and Congress• Professor Sylvester Chima, the Associate Professor and Head Programme of Bio and Research Ethics and Medical Law, at the College of Head Science at the University of Kwazulu Natal.
5/6/201557 minutes, 13 seconds
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Conservation in Africa

A meeting that looked at combating the illegal trade in wild fauna and flora in Congo-Brazzavile last week, made significant progress in the development of the African Common Strategy, which will be finalized and submitted for adoption to the African Union later in the year. International Conference on Illegal Trade in Wild Fauna and Flora In Africa also pushed for countries on the continent to take the leading role at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in introducing the Resolution on Wildlife Crime. Our guests to take this conversation further are:• Paul Harrison United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Global Advisor on Wild-Life Enforcement • Pelham Jones Private Rhino Owners Association • David Newton TRAFFIC Regional Director Traffic East and Southern Africa
5/5/201559 minutes, 7 seconds
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Gender Summit

African women scientists, thinkers, policy makers and businesswomen met this week to discuss how scientific research and innovation can be used to alleviate poverty and to create economic empowerment on the continent. The delegates met this week in Cape Town at the 5th Gender Summit Africa, aimed at productive conversations on how Africa can realise its full potential in infrastructure, science and other sectors. The summit started on Tuesday and concluding today. Joining us from Cape Town: • Professor Andre Beraud, researcher at Gendertime Coordination Team. Equal opportunities for women and men in engineering studies and careers in Europe (ECEPIE)• Dr Sonya Smith, Professor & Chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering Principal Investigator, HU ADVANCE-IT • Dr Elizabeth Rasekoala, Co-Chair, Pan-African Solidarity Education Network (PASEN), International.
4/30/201556 minutes, 48 seconds
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Freedom Day

27 April commemorates the day in 1994 when the first democratic election was held in South Africa. Today, South Africa celebrates Freedom Day to mark the liberation of our country and its people from a long period of colonialism and White minority domination . Apartheid 'officially' began in South Africa in 1948, but colonialism and oppression of the African majority had plagued South Africa since 1652. After decades of resistance, a stalemate between the Liberation Movement and the Apartheid government was reached in 1988.The African National Congress , South African Communist Party (SACP) , Pan African Congress (PAC) and other organizations were later unbanned on the 2nd of February 1990, and a non-racial constitution was eventually agreed upon and adopted in 1993. On 27 April 1994, the nation finally cast its vote in the first democratic election in the country. The ANC was then voted into power, and Nelson Mandela inaugurated as the President of South Africa. To help us pick the past success and and future challenges we have, Politicat Analyst, Moeletsi Mbeki and Revereand Thami Mvambo, Secretary-General, of the National Inter-faith Council of South Africa
4/29/201557 minutes, 6 seconds
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Children's Radio Foundation

In 2015, 75% of Africa’s population will be below the age of thirty. As a result, it is essential to give media space for these young people so that the society can hear what is important for them. Children’s radio foundation, an organization created in 2006, trains young radio reporters in five African countries. They produce and broadcast radio shows about issues that affect them, on 68 radio stations across Africa and in 25 different languages! Our guests are students : Simon, Precious and Titosili
4/28/201540 minutes, 9 seconds
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World Earth Day

Earth Day is honoured around the world on April 22nd, although larger events such as festivals and rallies are often organised for the weekends before or after April 22nd. Many communities also observe Earth Week or Earth Month, organising a series of environmental activities throughout the month of April. During this time people are encouraged to try to save the earth by installing solar panels on their roofs and save energy, to use water sparingly and not to litter. Schools are encouraged to start vegetable gardens and supply locals. Auto-mobile companies are by law required to manufacture low gas emitting cars in a bit to save our planet. To help us discuss the issues surrounding the day we have Makoma Lekalakala Sustainable Energy and Climate Change Programme Officer for Earth-Life, Patrick Dowling, Environmental Education Project Manager with Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa (WESSA), and Penny-Jane Cooke a Climate and Energy Campaigner at Greenpeace Africa:
4/23/201556 minutes, 46 seconds
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World Immunization Week

World Immunization Week 2015 will signal a renewed global, regional, and national effort to accelerate action to increase awareness and demand for immunization by communities, and improve vaccination delivery services. This year’s campaign focuses on closing the immunization gap and reaching equity in immunization levels as outlined in the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP). The Plan - endorsed by the 194 Member States of the World Health Assembly in May 2012 ― is a framework to prevent millions of deaths by 2020 through universal access to vaccines for people in all communities.Our guests are still on the line to further unpack this issue with us:1. DrBongileMabilaneUNICEF2. Dr Mark JitSenior Lecturer in Vaccine EpidemiologyLondon School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 3. Dr Anne von GottbergClinical MicrobiologistNational Institute for Communicable Diseases
4/20/201557 minutes, 11 seconds
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Chibok girls abduction

The UN Secretary General says the world must not forget the over 276 Chibok girls abducted by Boko Haram in northern Nigeria exactly one year ago. The abductions sparked an international outcry and the launch of the Bring Back Our Girls campaign. According to Amnesty International says the terhe UN Secretary General says the world must not forget the over 276 Chibok girls abducted by Boko Haram in northern Nigeria exactly one year ago. The abductions sparked an international outcry and the launch of the Bring Back Our Girls campaign. According to Amnesty International says the terrorist group is responsible for at least 2000 female abductions in 2014 alone - actions the UN Chief has called abhorrent. Sherwin Bryce-Pease reports on the statement issued by the UN to mark the anniversary.rorist group is responsible for at least 2000 female abductions in 2014 alone - actions the UN Chief has called abhorrent. Today on our program we look at this topic we are joined by: • Japheth J Omojuwa: A Nigerian blogger, socio-economic and political commentator, environmental consultant, Social Media expert and mentor• Mbuyiselo Botha is Sonke Gender Justice's Government and Media Relations Manager. • Lindy Khoza, from the South African Women in Dialogue
4/16/201557 minutes, 49 seconds
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Xenophobic attacks

The KwaZulu-Natal Government and Ethekwini Municipality has condemned attacks and retaliation associated with attacks on foreign nationals in the Durban CBD yesterday. The violence spread from the townships around Durban to the city centre where foreign nationals armed and defended themselves against attacks. Dumisani Shange reports that the city centre resembled a war zone during the clash between foreigners and the locals. Home Affairs Minister Malusi Gigaba has dismissed reports that he's apologised to King Goodwill Zwelithini for reprimanding him over the comments he made about foreign nationals. Addressing displaced foreign nationals, Gigaba had said leaders should refrain from using inflammatory language - which some interpreted as a reference to the King. To help us look at the situation in-depth we have :• Mrs Elinor Sisulu, Human Rights Activist and political analyst • Mayihlome Tshwete, spokesperson of South Africa’s Department of Home Affairs • Bishop Malusi Mpumlwana, Acting General Secretary of the South African Council of Churches • Mr Mkhululi White, National Coordinator, Protection of Foreign Business and Citizens
4/15/201558 minutes, 18 seconds
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United Nations Security Council

For many years, calls to include one of the 54 African states in the United Nations Security Council have been made. Last week, Zimbabwe president Robert Mugabe lamented the lack of transformation of the United Nations Security Council. Mugabe who is also the African Union and SADEC chair was speaking after private talks with President Jacob Zuma during his visit to South Africa. He says while the continent continues to propose changes to the veto system, there is still resistance from some of the permanent members. To help us analyse the situation, and the importance of the Security Council at the UN we have • Dr Jakkie Cilliers, the Executive Director of the Institute for Security Studies, • Mr Oshupeng Maseng, a lecturer at the University of the North West, in South Africa, and .Candice Moore, Senior researcher at The African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (ACCORD) a South Africa-based civil society organisation :
4/14/201555 minutes, 39 seconds
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COMESA Outcomes

Addressing a recent summit of the Common Market for East and Southern Africa, COMESA, African Development Bank Vice-President Dr. Geraldine Fraser Moleketi noted that industrialisation was a necessity for the transformation of Africa and for inter-regional trade. However, she cautioned delegates in the Tanzanian capital of Addis Ababa cautioned that very little has been done in the Sub-Saharan Africa's quest to industrialise. She urged Africa to use all tools, resources and policy instruments at its disposal to achieve all this. To help us look at this summit and the outcomes we earlier spoke to Dr. Fraser Moleketi herself, and Dr Peter Karunga, an independent economist
4/9/201557 minutes, 46 seconds
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Nigeria Revisited

The historic election results last week in Nigeria drew worldwide praise and stirred hopes of a democratic domino effect on the rest of the continent. If an incumbent president could step down willingly, and power could be transferred peacefully from one party to another in Nigeria, with its history of military coups and deadly ethnic and religious rivalries, not to mention a raging Islamist insurgency, why wouldn’t the same happen elsewhere? In the last two decades, incumbents have lost elections and peacefully handed over power to the opposition in about 10 other African countries, mostly smaller nations like Senegal, Benin, Zambia and Malawi. To look at this new development and expectations from the rest of the continent, we are joined on the line by:Japheth Omujuwa: Nigeria BloggerMartine Ewi: Researcher at the Institute for Security Studies Deprosa Muchena: Director: Amnesty International Southern Region Richard Ioanya: [Polotica Analyst at the University of Pretoria
4/8/201559 minutes, 55 seconds
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Food Security

The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
4/7/201559 minutes, 30 seconds
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African Indigenous Religions

For much of this week, many roads will heads to religious destinations where anthems of “halleluyahs” will resound the air and many will assume roles as pilgrims this Easter Weekend. Traditional African religions have been heavily influenced by Western faiths and some have been lost due to modernisation. Channel Africa presenter Benjamin Moshatama spoke to Funlayo E. Wood, director of the African and Diasporic Religious Studies Association and Professor Pitika Ntuli, expert in African indigenous knowledge systems.
4/2/201556 minutes, 56 seconds
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Traditional and Conventional Health

The World Health Organisation estimates that about eighty percent of African people living on the continent consult traditional healers before visiting their GP. It is also claimed that traditional healers to this day are still regarded as important on the continent as consulting modern health facilities. However, has the modern scientific community realised the significance of traditional methods of healing and therapy? To look at this question we are joined by: • Professor Shamy: Healer and Psychic • Dr Norman Mabasa, Chairperson of the National Convention on Dispensing:Doctors • Dr Nhlavana Maseko, President of the Traditional Healer Organization:
4/1/201557 minutes, 13 seconds
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African Air Safety

The recent airline crash has been the Germanwings Airbus crashes in French Alps with 150 people on board. The Germanwings plane flying from Barcelona to Dusseldorf disappeared off the radar before crashing. The crashes has been of concern internationally, as in the last 14 months that have been a series of high profile air crashes, a worrying number of which remain unresolved. There has also been talk in the public sphere on the safety of travelling using airlines and the competency of pilots. Today on the program we look at aviation safety. To help us look at the weekend’s happenings we have on the line” • J.P Truter, is the deputy CEO of the Commercial Aviation Association of South Africa • Mandy Van Der Moelen, chief flight instructor with the South African Flight Training Association• Linden Burns, MD of the magazine Plane Talking
3/31/201557 minutes, 5 seconds
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Nigerina Elections Part I

The head of Nigeria's electoral commission said yesterday that the first results could be announced starting today. Attahiru Jega, chairperson of the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) said that they hope that they will be able to declare within forty eight hours. The United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon congratulated Nigeria for holding a "largely peaceful and orderly" ballot this past weekend. However, there were technical problems with new devices to read bio-metric voter identity cards along with the delayed arrival of election material. Jega said that 348 polling stations across the country were affected, including 90 in the financial hub of Lagos in the southwest, including two in the Federal Capital Territory of Abuja.To help us look at the weekend's happenings we have on the line: • Japheth J Omojuwa: A Nigerian blogger, socio-economic and political commentator, environmental consultant, Social Media expert and mentor. • Martin Ewi: Researcher based at the Institute for Security Studies in Johannesburg
3/30/201556 minutes, 56 seconds
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Women in Agriculture

The African Union and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development is currently hosting the 11th Partnership Platform of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Program in Johannesburg. The theme of this forum is “Walking the Talk”. This is an Africa-led initiative meant to eliminate hunger and reduce poverty. To do this, African governments have agreed to increase public investment in agriculture by a minimum of 10 percent of their national budgets to raise agricultural productivity by at least 6 percent per annum. To help us discuss this we are now joined on the line by:Asatu Jalou : NEPAD: Head of Programme DevelopmentDr Nalishebo Meebelo: Deputy Co-ordinator of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Program at the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA)
3/26/201559 minutes, 5 seconds
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Water Talk

The Unite Nations (UN) Secretary General recently wrote: "To address the many challenges related to water, we must work in a spirit of urgent co-operation, open to new ideas and innovation and prepared to share the solutions that we all need for a sustainable future". He was saying this in an opinion peace on the Saturday Star of the 21 March 2014 dubbed "The World needs to be Water Wise". Statistics suggest 748 million around the world do not have access to clean drinking water, and everyday women around the world spend about 200 hours carrying water, that means on average women in these regions spend about 25% of their day collecting water for their families. In South Africa, 35% of clean drinking water is used for gardening. To help us look at the water situation in Africa, we have Dr Thomas Nkambule from the University of South Africa, Dr Matthys Dippenaar of the University of Pretoria's Geology Department, Melita Steele of Green Peace Africa and Dr Chris Maseki of South Africa's Department of Water and Sanitation:
3/25/201556 minutes, 3 seconds
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Cecil John Rhodes Statue

A group of University of Cape Town students in South Africa say they will continue occupying one of the buildings at the institution until management gives them a definite date when the statue of British Colonialist, Cecil John Rhodes, will be removed. The group of around 30 people has been camping out at the Bremner building, since Friday afternoon. They had initially indicated that their sit-in would be for the duration of the weekend. In a campaign, now known as "Rhodes Must Fall", there has been the throwing of faeces at the statue and calls by students at Rhodes University in Grahamstown for a name change. To discuss the situation, we have Chumani Maxwele , a Cape Town student involved in the protest, and Benjamin Fogel a freelance Journalist and former Rhodes Student:
3/23/201556 minutes, 25 seconds
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Arts and Culture Schools Programme.

Keith Tabisher – senior education specialist for music for the Western Cape Education department in South Africa.Camillo Lombard – Music Director of the Traning programmes and Principal at the Music Institute.Lynn Hannibal from Heathfield High Schootl from Groote Schuur, Cape Town. South Africa
3/19/201558 minutes, 40 seconds
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African Dialogue

We continue our live broadcasting at the Second Annual Public-Private Dialogue Forum On Infrastructure Projects to be held in Rosebank, Johannesburg South Africa
3/18/201554 minutes, 29 seconds
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Infrastructure Projects

Channel Africa will be broadcasting live at the Second Annual Public-Private Dialogue Forum On Infrastructure Projects to be held in Rosebank, Johannesburg South Africa
3/17/201559 minutes, 50 seconds
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Teaching Africa

Six teachers from Africa have been named as some of the most innovative an international prize which has shortlisted only 50 educators in the worldThe Global Teachers Prize, also reffered to as the Nobel Prize for Teaching, is the largest occasion of its kind which acknowledges teachers who use creative ways of teaching. The teachers from continent slected for the prize come from countries which include Kenya, Malawi, Morocco, Uganda, Tanzania and Madagascar. To tell us more, here is Albert Nsengiyyumva, Rwandan Minister in charge of primary and secondary education, and South African Esther Mc Farlane from the Youth Advocacy Group:
3/16/201556 minutes, 38 seconds
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Journalism and Culture

Music journalism is quickly becoming a dying art in mainstream media outlets in South Africa, with the country’s newspaper and online news platform shredding away their sections of art, dance, film and live performance reviews. The conversation of new music and reflecting on the past of South African music, has now unfortunately moved on to the peripheries of the blogosphere and independent online world. An unfortunate situation persists in a country rich in the current vibrancy, where new movements of music in jazz, South African hip-hop and cultural variations of music in the country remain under-documented. Bringing back this conversation of relationship between music and the written world is the Cape Town International Jazz Festival, by hosting a public reading and panel discussion led by art journalist, Percy Mabandu. This will take place a few days before the main festival in Cape Town, South Africa. To look at the relationship between the arts and journalism, and where this industry finds itself in contemporary South Africa we earlier speak to: • Percy Mabandu, art writers and journalist. • Fiona Lloyd, South African journalist • Peter McKenzie - who heads up the photo journalism course - has also confirmed. He can be contacted on
3/12/201559 minutes, 51 seconds
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First Human

A jawbone of what is described to be from “the first human” has recently been discovered in Ethiopia. The fossil piece is said to be as be around 2.8 million years old, which is four hundred years older than the oldest than time when researchers thought human had first existed. The fossil has been reported to be found by an Ethiopian Archaeological student, and due to this new discovery researchers are saying that this fossil gives the first insight into the most important transitions in human evolution. My colleague, Tumelo Zulu, spoke to the fossil discover Chalachew Seyoum, this morning, to find out more: To help us make sense of all these big terms and language we have on the line:Professor Francis Thackeray Wits University Evolutionary Studies InstituteReinoud Boers Chairman: South African Archaeology Society
3/11/201559 minutes, 48 seconds
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Higher Education

Senegal is hosting a three day African Higher Education Summit starting today. The Summit will centre on the theme: “Revitalizing Higher Education for Africa’s Future.” The primary goal of the summit is to develop a common vision and contribute towards the development of an action plan to transform the African higher education sector in the next 50 years.To assist us look at this summit we are joined by: • Dr. Tendai Murisa - Executive Director: Trust-Africa. • Dr. Nkem Khumba: The Centre of African Studies at the University of Michigan (USA). He is an expert on Science Technology and Mathematics (STEM) issues.
3/10/201559 minutes, 34 seconds
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World Conference on Women

The year 2015 marks the 20th anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women and the landmark Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. Considered the most comprehensive blueprint on advancing women's rights, the 1995 Beijing roadmap was adopted by 189 governments. But 20 years on, the commitments made are only partially fulfilled. From today until the 20th of this month, the 59th Commission on the Status of Women review global implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action and take stock of where women stand in the world today. But from the political to the economic spheres, progress has been made, but not enough. To help us unpack this subject we are joined on the line by:• Phindile Dhlamini: Managing Director: The Gracefully Consulting Team• Dr Vuyo Mahlati, President of the International Woman's Forum SA • Commissioner Thoko Mpumlwana:Deputy Director for gender Equality
3/9/201557 minutes, 36 seconds
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South Africa's Cape Town International Jazz Festival

South Africa's Cape Town International Jazz Festival is billed as one of the largest jazz festival on the African Continent, and the fourth largest in the world. The festival brings a melting pot international artists into the continent for a feast of jazz and urban music. It begins on the 19th of this month and goes on for ten days. However the festival does not only focus on entertaining crowds, but also includes strong development programmes in disadvantage communities. To help us explore the theme - How important is cultural exchange for social development, we have Billy Domingo, co-founder and Festival Director , China Dyira, Project manager of the Intyholo Jazz Development Programme and Craig Sparks, Assistant Manager for Planning of the Festival
3/5/201557 minutes, 48 seconds
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DTT Africa

The International Telecommunications Union, treaty which was signed in June 2006, stipulated that by June 2015, signatories need to have migrated from analogue to digital broadcasting services. It was signed in Geneva at the conclusion of the ITU's Regional Radio communication Conference and it signaled the development of 'all-digital' terrestrial broadcast services for sound and television. The idea is that by 2015 Europe, Africa, Middle East and the Islamic Republic of Iran, are supposed to have digitized their broadcasting. Digital broadcasting represents a more equitable, just and people-centered Information Society. But the question on everybody’s lips is, how far have the African continent gone in migrating from analogue to digital broadcasting and what are challenges and opportunities. To help us look at this and give us more light on this we are joined by:To assist us on this we are now joined on the line by: • James Mbugua: Communication Consultant Nairobi, Kenya • Hans-Werner Matthaei: Project Manager Namibia Broadcasting Corporation:
3/2/201559 minutes, 59 seconds
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Refugees in South Africa

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees is said to be closing its operations in Namibia, and building its support in South Africa. In recent times South Africa has been scripted as one of the most preferred destination for asylum seekers as well as immigrants. We have also witnessed that due to the current scio-economic situation in South Africa , relations between asylum seekers , refugees and poor South Africans have soured. To help us analyse the situation we have: Ms Clementine Nkweta -Salami, UNHCR Regional Representative for Southern Africa,Mkhuseli Apleni, Director General of South Africa’s Department of Home AfairsAnd Beatrix Marais, Acting National Executive Director of Child Welfare in SA
2/24/201555 minutes, 10 seconds
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Indigenous Languages

Maputo, Mozambique is currently hosting a two-day international conference on Indigenous Languages, with the aim of promoting Southern African dialects. While colonial languages such as English and Portuguese are normally used as main languages for business and education, but local dialects such as Shona and Zulu have been demoted to home languages. To help us investigate the situation we have Professor Sozinho Matsinhe, Africa, Professor Ekkehard Wolff Who held the position of Chair for African linguistics at Germany's University of Leipzig, Professor Leketi Makalela, Head of the Division of Languages, Literacies at the University of the Witwatersrand, and Professor David Mosoma Deputy Chairperson of the South African based RL Rights Commission:
2/19/20151 hour, 3 seconds
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Nigeria International Force

A decision has been made by the African Union to deploy a multinational joint task force to Nigeria to fight the militant Islamist group Boko Haram. A meeting held in Nigeria earlier this month by the Peace and Security Council of the African Union, has confirmed up to 7.500 troops from Nigeria and its four neighboring countries, Benin, Cameroon, Chad and Niger that shall embark on the fight against Nigeria’s terrorist group, but an obstacle to the agreement on funding could delay the force’s deployment. It’s of importance to receive the approval in getting the U.N Security Council’s go ahead for military involvement by other African countries in support of to diminish the Boko Haram. To help us on this story: • Liesl Louw-Vaundran: Independent Journalist and Analyst• Mausi Segun: Human Rights Watch Researcher• Netsanet Belay: Africa Director for Research and Advocacy : Amnesty International • Check Achua, Research Specialist: Peace and Security program of the Africa Institute of South Africa, AISA
2/18/201558 minutes, 40 seconds
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South Africans in AU Ebola trip

The African Union Support to Ebola Outbreak in West Africa (ASEOWA), in collaboration with the South African government, is sending 23 South African health workers to Ebola affected countries. The health workers, including 20 nurses and three paramedics are expected to depart Johannesburg for Sierra Leone on Friday, 20 February 2015. African Union Commissioner of Social Affairs, Dr Mustapha Sidiki Kaloko, commended the South African government for sending health workers, saying that the 835 African medical personnel so far deployed by ASEOWA have impacted positively in reducing both new infections and deaths from Ebola. To look at this we are joined on the line by:Sarah L. Barber: World Health Organization Representative based in Pretoria South AfricaJoe Maila: South Africa Ministry of Health: Spokesperson:Dr Pappie Majuba: Chief Medical Officer: Right to Care
2/17/201548 minutes, 51 seconds
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African Passport

With the new conversation of regional and continental integration, as a new agenda aspired by the African Union. The conversation includes the idea of an African passport is one that may take centre stage in the near future. With Successes of the East African Community with their own regional passport, for Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda. A progressive stance that is hoped will improve industrial and Tourist developments. To help us analyse the possibility of a continental passport, we have Dr Chris Nshimbi, Co-director of GovInn (the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation at the University of Pretoria, and Roshan Dadoo, Regional Advocacy officer for the consortium for Refugees and Migrants in South Africa:
2/16/201553 minutes, 5 seconds
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African Dialogue

South Africa's Parliament this week insisted that it has enacted legislation which covers the full field of access to information, including private donor information belonging to political parties. This emerged in the Constitutional Court during arguments in an application brought by the My Vote Counts Campaign. They want the Court to compel parliament to enact specific legislation to regulate the disclosure of political parties' private donor information. To analyse the situation in Africa, AFRICA Dialogue's Benjamin Moshatama spoke to Ben Winks, an Associate at the Law Firm Webber and Wentzel, and also a supporter of the My Vote Counts Campaign, and Glen Mpani, Democracy and Governance Programme Manager at the Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa
2/12/201557 minutes, 32 seconds
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Heads of State African Union summit held in Addis Ababa. Agenda 2063

The new way forward for Africa was unpacked recently at the Heads of State African Union summit held in Addis Ababa. Agenda 2063 was adopted as the ambitious political commitment for development of Africa, focusing on regional integration and industrialisation on the continent. To help us explain what the plan actually means, we have Talla Kebe, Acting Head of Knowledge Management,with the New Partnership for African Development - NEPAD - and help collating the BluePrint on the implementation of Agenda 2063, and Professor Alinah Segobye, a lecturer at the South African-based Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute:
2/11/201559 minutes, 58 seconds